Andriod, iPhone and the evolution of cell phones

Discussion in 'iPhone' started by unfrozen.jon, Oct 10, 2008.

  1. unfrozen.jon macrumors member

    unfrozen.jon

    Joined:
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    Canada
    #1
    Well the first Andriod phone, the G1, is being released soon and I'm curious what else thinks of the entrance of Andriod. Personally I may be a bit of an Apple fanboy but I'm not anti-everything else that isn't Apple, especially since I am also a fan of Google. While Andriod may be a competitor to the iPhone I don't really see it a threat to it, the iPhone may be for diverse tastes but is limited to GSM, exclusive carriers in several countries (that aren't always the best carriers, ROBBERS Canada) and while the price isn't bad its still high end hardware. Android may compete with the iPhone in this area but I doubt it will take much of any business from Apple, I can see it basically as filling the gap for the rest of the market (CDMA, low end phones and other carriers) in this new vision of smartphone/MID combo dvices at a low consumer price.

    Both companies contribute to Open Source and while they compete they will continue to share technology and products as they already have (Googles Chrome built from Apples Webkit & Apple using Google Apps on their iPhone). I can see the development communities for both becoming intertwined once Androids market is forced to adopt some regulations and they institute a pay market. We already see evidence of that in one of the most promising games built specifically for this new flavour of OS & hardware, Parallel Kingdoms.

    The iPhone 3G set a new bar for pricing (regardless of some paying more in the longrun via contracts) for such a functional device that is forcing the smartphone industry to follow suite, along with Android it will cut down significantly the marketshare for Windows Mobile, Palm, etc, which has less functionality (still waiting for Google Docs or a mobile iWorks or 3rd party equivalent) and in the case of WinMo costs the hardware makers more. That being said, I am not overly impressed with Android as of yet or the G1 although Google not controlling the hardware has little choice in its first phone, I'm sure there will be much nicer devices on the way and improvements to the OS. You can't expect Googles first venture into a complete OS to be nearly as polished as OS X and I think it should still be titled a Beta version. Still I believe in Googles abilities and they are no lightweight, Android will nicely compliment the iPhone and the newer innovations of RIM's Blackberrys (yes I'm Canadian and quite proud of their success and innovation) in evolving the mobile market.

    I owned a fancy Motorola cameraphone four years back and paid more than I did for the iPhone because of the craze of cell phones but after a month I realized the technology was essentially junk so once my contract ran out I went back to wandering around with quarters searching for payphones. Everytime I went into a store that sold cell phones I would tell the salesmen that I wasn't interested and cell phones weren't worth the money. I stand by that, these new devices are as far apart from traditional cell phones as cell phones were from landline phones. I also predicted to my wife (during the iPhone rumour days, before its announcement) that traditional cell phone makers would end up being overtaken by handheld computers from the computer industry. Well looks like I was at least partly right, Google making a open source mobile OS kinda came out of left feild. Still only a couple of the dominant traditional cell phone makers such as RIM, may retain their place in the market without the help of the Open Handset Alliance.
     
  2. kdarling macrumors demi-god

    kdarling

    Joined:
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    First university coding class = 46 years ago
    #2
    Not to some of us:

    Google buys Android - Aug 2005

    Although I was surprised that they didn't go further and port Android to lots of current phones. Imagine the leg up they'd have if all the WM phones could install it right now, for example.

    The writing on the wall about mobile devices has been there for at least five years, as has the move to touchscreens and easier UIs. It just got accelerated out of the labs because of Apple jumping in without any legacy devices to support.

    (This reminds me of the news bit that came out TWO MONTHS before Jobs first showed off the iPhone... giving the manufacturer details... but few paid attention.)

    Foxconn to build millions of Apple iPhones - Nov 2006
     
  3. xraydoc macrumors 604

    xraydoc

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    #3
    I wouldn't call the Blackberry a traditional cellphone.
     
  4. kas23 macrumors 603

    kas23

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2007
    #4
    I would like some more information about Android. I'm a bit confused though. There are a bunch of people saying that Android is going to compete with the iPhone's OS, but has anyone on here tried Android out. Can someone list, aside from being an open source platform, or give me a link on how Android is a good OS platform?
     
  5. kdarling macrumors demi-god

    kdarling

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    #5
  6. barkomatic macrumors 68040

    Joined:
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    Manhattan
    #6
    In order for an Android phone to compete with the iphone it will need to be on a piece of hardware that is comparable to the iphone. The G1 certainly isn't that piece of hardware. The app store is also a big hit for Apple but I admit its vulnerable due to the missteps Apple has made--which they still have time to correct. From what I've read, the Android marketplace will only have free apps at first and I doubt there will be as many usefull things there until people are allowed to sell their hard work.

    Once I see Android running on a well-designed, nice looking phone with all the capability of the iphone I will start to get interested. Once all that is in place *and* there are compelling applications for it I'll probably start to seriously consider it. On top of that, if a carrier releases all of the above and doesn't try to restrict what I can and cannot run on an Android phone(like T-mobile will do with the G1) I'll switch from the iphone(assuming Apple is still exerting the iron curtain on their own platform) One should note that although Google states that Android is open source and happy and free--carriers will be carriers and may *never* allow it to fully reach its potential.
     
  7. kdarling macrumors demi-god

    kdarling

    Joined:
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    #7
    Yeah, you'd think they would've gone all out for a good looker the first time.

    Rumors say that the HTC Touch HD might come to the USA as an Android device.
     
  8. kas23 macrumors 603

    kas23

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2007
    #8
    I'm not sure if you were directly responding to my question, but...

    Well, this just tells me that it is likely going to be easier being a developer for Android that the iPhone platform. You will be given more freedom to develop the app of your choice (not Steve's choice). But, then how is this any different than Windows Mobile?

    The fact that it is going to be available for different makes of phones, or that the G1 has sold 1.5 million already, tells me nothing about the end-user's experience. I am not a developer and am mostly just interested in the end-user's experience.

    I know that by being an open platform, the potential for Android is likely 10x greater than the iPhone, but what if the experience/UI really sucks?
     
  9. kas23 macrumors 603

    kas23

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2007
    #9
    But that won't stop people from extensively mod'ing/tricking out their own phone. The OOB experience just will be restricted. Sort of like WM right now.
     
  10. kas23 macrumors 603

    kas23

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2007
    #10
    Well, then it all depends on whether or not Android is going to be better than WM. They will both have the same flexibility though. Judging by what we are seeing with the iPhone's OS, it may take Android years to become more refined.
     
  11. iammike1 macrumors 6502a

    iammike1

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    Oct 25, 2007
    Location:
    Columbia MD
    #11
    Countdown until someone ports it to the iPhone hardware.....just to prove that they can. lol
     
  12. kdarling macrumors demi-god

    kdarling

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    #12
    Ah. That's different from your original question asking "how good an OS platform" it is.

    You're instead asking how the UI or user experience (UX). That's subjective of course.

    I don't have a G-1. The UI looks okay, and has a couple of neat items people have said would look good on the iPhone (or any phone for that matter), such as the context sensitive pulldown bar.

    You can Google around and watch videos, or you can download the SDK simulator and try it yourself. There was also a T-mobile G-1 simulator page, but it seems to be gone right now.
     

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