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StellarVixen

macrumors 68040
Original poster
Mar 1, 2018
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Has anyone had the same problem? I used to remove Bash deprecation message by editing bash_profile file, but now that doesn't appear to work anymore? It looks like Apple has decided that it JUST HAS to be their way once again.


Can anyone suggest something else that works? I really don't want to see this stupid thing every time I open the Terminal. And I am using up to date version of Bash. I want to use Bash.
 

posguy99

macrumors 68020
Nov 3, 2004
2,282
1,531
Can anyone suggest something else that works? I really don't want to see this stupid thing every time I open the Terminal. And I am using up to date version of Bash. I want to use Bash.
You're not. That's really all that needs to be said. The deprecation message is in Apple's bash binary, if you're seeing it, that's what you're launching.
 

chrfr

macrumors G5
Jul 11, 2009
13,563
7,091
Can you clarify? What "I am not"?
You're not using the current version of Bash. Apple's is version 3.2.57. The current version is 5.0. Apple will be removing Bash altogether at some point, although it appears it'll still be in Big Sur.
 

StellarVixen

macrumors 68040
Original poster
Mar 1, 2018
3,190
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You're not using the current version of Bash. Apple's is version 3.2.57. The current version is 5.0. Apple will be removing Bash altogether at some point, although it appears it'll still be in Big Sur.

I cannot understand why am I not clear enough. I AM using up to date version of Bash (5.0.18) to be exact.

EDIT: Anyway, I solved it, it was using old path, instead of the new path.
 
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mj_

macrumors 68000
May 18, 2017
1,618
1,281
Austin, TX
Just a curiosity, any particular reason why you are sticking with bash instead of using the time to switch over to zsh? Because sooner or later you will be forced to either switch shell or switch operating systems; Apple is going to remove bash from macOS shortly for reasons that I don't quite understand and support. Then again Apple giveth and Apple taketh away.

It took me a while but I've managed to switch my entire profile, including all environment variables, prompts, settings, etc. over to zsh. I even managed to get VI mode working, and although it works slightly different from its bash implementation I eventually got used to it.
 

posguy99

macrumors 68020
Nov 3, 2004
2,282
1,531
Just a curiosity, any particular reason why you are sticking with bash instead of using the time to switch over to zsh? Because sooner or later you will be forced to either switch shell or switch operating systems; Apple is going to remove bash from macOS shortly for reasons that I don't quite understand and support. Then again Apple giveth and Apple taketh away.
No need to. I've been using ksh for years.
 

Taz Mangus

macrumors 604
Mar 10, 2011
7,815
3,504
Just a curiosity, any particular reason why you are sticking with bash instead of using the time to switch over to zsh? Because sooner or later you will be forced to either switch shell or switch operating systems; Apple is going to remove bash from macOS shortly for reasons that I don't quite understand and support. Then again Apple giveth and Apple taketh away.
No need to. I've been using ksh for years.

Not sure if you realize that @mj_ was referring to zsh and you responded about ksh.
 

StellarVixen

macrumors 68040
Original poster
Mar 1, 2018
3,190
5,674
Somewhere between 0 and 1
Just a curiosity, any particular reason why you are sticking with bash instead of using the time to switch over to zsh? Because sooner or later you will be forced to either switch shell or switch operating systems; Apple is going to remove bash from macOS shortly for reasons that I don't quite understand and support. Then again Apple giveth and Apple taketh away.

It took me a while but I've managed to switch my entire profile, including all environment variables, prompts, settings, etc. over to zsh. I even managed to get VI mode working, and although it works slightly different from its bash implementation I eventually got used to it.

no. You will always be able to install bash yourself if you want. It won’t be among the default shells available, but there is nothing that will prevent you from installing it yourself.

I was using bash all this time, and I don’t really see reason to change.
 

mj_

macrumors 68000
May 18, 2017
1,618
1,281
Austin, TX
Of course you will always be able to install bash, or ksh, or tcsh, or any other shell for that matter retroactively. The question is whether or not it really makes sense to do so. In some cases there are things that you can do with one shell that can't be achieved with another. In most cases, however, other shells will work perfectly fine and do the job just as well. In my personal experience the transition between bash and zsh is one of the smoother ones that I've experienced. Nothing compared to, say, transitioning from the traditional sh on Solaris UNIX installations (I mean pre-OpenSolaris editions running on Sun's own SPARC processors) to the much more advanced bash. That's why I was wondering why you insisted on running one over the other, but I guess you've answered that question ;)

I was using bash all this time, and I don’t really see reason to change.

Fair enough.
 

johnalan

macrumors 6502a
Jul 15, 2009
833
981
Dublin, Ireland
Apple only changed from bash to zsh due to licensing issues.

Rather than editing files, use home-brew to install bash 5, then change default shell to /usr/bin/bash.
 
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