Another Prediction

Discussion in 'Mac Pro' started by Mactrunk, Jun 1, 2012.

  1. Mactrunk macrumors regular

    Joined:
    May 12, 2005
  2. goMac macrumors 603

    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2004
    #2
    I like how we've gone from "the Mac Pro is dead!" to "the Mac Pro is getting a major redesign!" in the course of two days. :)

    Not that I don't think a redesign is off the table, I just find it amusing.
     
  3. minifridge1138 macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jun 26, 2010
    #3
    Their model/render looks just like the XServer.

    I can't imagine Apple would kill 1 product due to lack of sales, then redesign an existing one to look exactly like the one they killed.
     
  4. hollyhillbilly macrumors member

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2012
    #4
    Too Loud

    As a previous owner of the xserve, all I can say about this is, this better run quiet. I loved my xserve, but I am glad it was in the IT room. I can not image having the previous xserve on set with sound rolling anywhere close, or clients in an edit bay, maybe they have solved the loud fan noise that kicks in.
     
  5. Prince134 macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2010
    #5
    I don't think that's gonna happen. xserve was axed by Steve Jobs 2 years ago.
    One of his response to an inquiry about continuing xserve was : Hardly anyone buy it! - a short response directly from Steve Jobs. Current (or similar but smaller) form factor should be more close to reality, should a new MacPro come true.
     
  6. Rustus Maximus macrumors 6502

    Rustus Maximus

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2003
    #6
    Simply not true.
     
  7. tony3d macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2006
    #7
    Where the hell would one put such a design other than a rack. I don't have a rack. I have a desk.
     
  8. theluggage macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2011
    #8
    A better way of putting it is that Thunderbolt - essentially external PCIe - can potentially satisfy many of the needs of customers who have previously bought Mac Pros because they wanted to fit internal hard drives and PCIe cards.

    Meanwhile, processor speeds/core counts are rising and power consumption is falling, so fewer and fewer people actually need the high-end chips.

    As for servers - even Apple didn't kit out their data center with their own kit. Apples USP is ease of use and industrial design - not important for professional servers.

    Finally, long gone are the days when only Apple and Commodore had platforms that were technically capable of high-end video editing or 3D graphics. Whatever Apple does, more and more of such users will be switching to commodity PC hardware.

    At some point, the number of customers who want/need Mac Pros will be too low for Apple to bother with, and they'll be gone.
     

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