Anova Wi-Fi Precision Sous Vide Cooker Becomes First Cooking Device Available in Apple Retail Stores

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Apple has recently started offering the Anova Wi-Fi Precision Cooker both online and in its retail stores, marking the first smart cooking device the company has sold to customers. Anova is a company that makes a range of Wi-Fi and Bluetooth-connected precision cookers for sous vide meal preparation.

The Wi-Fi Precision Cooker Apple offers is Anova's newest model, equipped with Wi-Fi and Bluetooth connectivity that allows it to interface with an iPhone for monitoring purposes. Using the iPhone app, it's possible to set the temperature on the pot from afar and monitor its cooking progress. The Anova app also includes a selection of top sous vide recipes.


For those unfamiliar with sous vide cooking, it's a water bath cooking method that uses precise temperature control to prevent overcooking. The Anova Precision Cooker heats up and circulates water in a pot, evenly cooking food to a precise temperature that's not possible with more traditional cooking methods.

The Anova Precision Cooker is a smart sous vide device that gets you professional quality results every time, while providing control from an app on your iPhone. Sous vide uses precision temperature control so you can't overcook your food. Simply attach your Precision Cooker to any pot, add water, drop in your desired food in a sealed bag or glass jar, and press start.

The Precision Cooker has both Bluetooth and WI-FI connectivity so you know what's going on with your food no matter where you are. The Precision Cooker notifies you when your food is ready, and will keep it warm until you're ready to eat.
Eli Hodapp, editor-in-chief of our sister site TouchArcade, owns an Anova Precision Cooker and says it's "incredible." He says "everyone should own one" but notes the Wi-Fi and Bluetooth features on newer, more expensive models may not be useful to everyone. With sous vide, the main difference between immersion circulators is the amount of water that can be kept at a precise temperature. Since there's no fear of overcooking, little oversight is needed.

The Anova Wi-Fi Precision Cooker is available from the Apple online store for $199.95. It's also available immediately from a number of Apple Stores across the United States.

Article Link: Anova Wi-Fi Precision Sous Vide Cooker Becomes First Cooking Device Available in Apple Retail Stores
 

qtx43

macrumors 6502a
Aug 4, 2007
659
16
Sous vide is awesome, makes great pulled pork for example. But I wouldn't buy this product. You set the temperature, and don't really need to monitor it unless you're pathologically obsessive. And the physical size looks like it takes up a lot of room, and wouldn't work well in the crock pot. What I have (dork food, yes, dork) has a wire you stick in the water, works fine and costs half that.
 

Jay42

macrumors 65816
Jul 14, 2005
1,362
506
Sous vide is awesome, makes great pulled pork for example. But I wouldn't buy this product. You set the temperature, and don't really need to monitor it unless you're pathologically obsessive. And the physical size looks like it takes up a lot of room, and wouldn't work well in the crock pot. What I have (dork food, yes, dork) has a wire you stick in the water, works fine and costs half that.
Uhhh, this thing is pretty slim (like a paper towel tube) and you can use it in any pot or polycarb container. No crock pot required. I don't have one but I'm dangerously close to pulling the trigger.
 
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kugino

macrumors 65816
Jul 10, 2003
1,086
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Uhhh, this thing is pretty slim (like a paper towel tube) and you can use it in any pot or polycarb container. No crock pot required. I don't have one but I'm dangerously close to pulling the trigger.
I have their first generation one and also their BT version from Kickstarter. I wish I had waited for the wifi one, but it's not a big deal.

and yeah, they're pretty awesome...steaks, eggs, chicken, fish. they all turn out pretty amazing. while a wire and a pot certainly work, this thing is quite small and offers a lot
of automation to make the process easier. love it.
 

mmomega

macrumors demi-god
Dec 30, 2009
3,593
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DFW, TX
Uhhh, this thing is pretty slim (like a paper towel tube) and you can use it in any pot or polycarb container. No crock pot required. I don't have one but I'm dangerously close to pulling the trigger.
I am at the same point, very close to getting one then I see this one MR.
 

ArtOfWarfare

macrumors G3
Nov 26, 2007
8,845
4,624
Unless I really don't get it, does this boil everything?

I don't want to boil a steak. And I could buy a lot of steaks for $200.
My understanding is your food doesn't actually come in contact with the water. You put the food in containers and the containers go in the water.

The whole thing sounds quite dumb to me. You've replaced the heated air from an oven with heated water in this device. Seems like it would be quite a bit slower than the oven, since the water would take longer to heat than the air.

Even then, it sounds like you've baked your food. Baked steak is okay, but grilled is better.
 
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sudo1996

Suspended
Aug 21, 2015
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My understanding is your food doesn't actually come in contact with the water. You put the food in containers and the containers go in the water.

The whole thing sounds quite dumb to me. You've replaced the heated air from an oven with heated water in this device. Seems like it would be quite a bit slower than the oven, since the water would take longer to heat than the air.

Even then, it sounds like you've baked your food. Baked steak is okay, but grilled is better.
I was wondering about this too. The article explains somewhere, but I missed it at first and actually misread it like 3 times, which is why I edited my reply so many times.
Simply attach your Precision Cooker to any pot, add water, drop in your desired food in a sealed bag or glass jar, and press start.
You are correct. I guess this device mixes it for you. The device itself is cool, but I'm dubious of the cooking method. Maybe the fact that water is more heat-conductive than air makes it better than baking in some way? I've never tried it, though.

Here in the frat, I've gotta shove food for 18 people into a pot that's too small or several pans, light pieces of spaghetti on fire to ignite the stove burners, and mix it like a mad man to make sure nothing burns. Not to sound arrogant, but I think my food turns out pretty well.
 
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shadowbird423

macrumors 6502
Sep 8, 2009
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Chapel Hill
I was wondering about this too. The article explains somewhere, but I missed it at first and actually misread it like 3 times, which is why I edited my reply so many times. You are correct. I guess this device mixes it for you. The device itself is cool, but I'm dubious of the cooking method. Maybe the fact that water is more heat-conductive than air makes it better than baking in some way? I've never tried it, though.

Here in the frat, I've gotta shove food for 18 people into a pot that's too small or several pans, light pieces of spaghetti on fire to ignite the stove burners, and mix it like a mad man to make sure nothing burns. Not to sound arrogant, but I think my food turns out pretty well.
Here's the thing about sous vide: you can make a ton of meat or whatever consistently. I have the first generation of this product and it's pretty awesome, it takes the guess work out of making steaks, chicken, etc. It works by heating everything from the outside in at exactly the same temperature, meaning that you don't end up with a overcooked exterior and undercooked interior or some variation of that result. I sear everything afterwards because stuff that has been browned on the outside tastes better (Malliard reaction). Anything made this way is also ready to be frozen and reheated in water for about 10 minutes, which makes preping healthy food for a week easy. As a fellow college student, I think that it would work for making nicer meals for 18 people. But it's possible (probable) no one has time for that in a frat house.

Unrelated, but why FreeBSD? And is there a reason I should get a small server with it? Also, is your PC a hackintosh?
 
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todd2000

macrumors 68000
Nov 14, 2005
1,613
9
Danville, VA
Sous vide is awesome, makes great pulled pork for example. But I wouldn't buy this product. You set the temperature, and don't really need to monitor it unless you're pathologically obsessive. And the physical size looks like it takes up a lot of room, and wouldn't work well in the crock pot. What I have (dork food, yes, dork) has a wire you stick in the water, works fine and costs half that.
You know this is the entire device right? It heats the water and circulates it. It isn't just a thermometer.
 
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mdelvecchio

macrumors 68040
Sep 3, 2010
3,117
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Sous vide is awesome, makes great pulled pork for example. But I wouldn't buy this product. You set the temperature, and don't really need to monitor it unless you're pathologically obsessive. And the physical size looks like it takes up a lot of room, and wouldn't work well in the crock pot. What I have (dork food, yes, dork) has a wire you stick in the water, works fine and costs half that.
you don't really know what you're talking about. this is a great product and works very well. try using one first, next time.
 
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mdelvecchio

macrumors 68040
Sep 3, 2010
3,117
1,056
My understanding is your food doesn't actually come in contact with the water. You put the food in containers and the containers go in the water.

The whole thing sounds quite dumb to me. You've replaced the heated air from an oven with heated water in this device. Seems like it would be quite a bit slower than the oven, since the water would take longer to heat than the air.

Even then, it sounds like you've baked your food. Baked steak is okay, but grilled is better.
I love how you guys are bagging on something you don't know anything about. no, it's not like baking a steak. it's like perfectly cooking a steak to the desired temp from center to outer edges. do some research. Modernist Cuisine is s good place to start.
 
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xyzzy

macrumors newbie
Jul 23, 2002
12
6
Unless I really don't get it, does this boil everything?

I don't want to boil a steak. And I could buy a lot of steaks for $200.
No, the temperature isn't as high as boiling. For example, for a poached egg you might use 145°F (62.8°C). For an egg with a firm yolk, 150°F (65.6°C). For a hard-boiled egg for say, an egg salad, 165°F (73.9°C). But in all cases, it's the temperature that determines the doneness, not the time you cook it. So 45 minutes or 2 hours, the eggs have a reliable, repeatable degree of doneness. It's about consistency, not speed.
 
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gprovida

macrumors newbie
Nov 6, 2008
21
1



Apple has recently started offering the Anova Wi-Fi Precision Cooker both online and in its retail stores, marking the first smart cooking device the company has sold to customers. Anova is a company that makes a range of Wi-Fi and Bluetooth-connected precision cookers for sous vide meal preparation.

The Wi-Fi Precision Cooker Apple offers is Anova's newest model, equipped with Wi-Fi and Bluetooth connectivity that allows it to interface with an iPhone for monitoring purposes. Using the iPhone app, it's possible to set the temperature on the pot from afar and monitor its cooking progress. The Anova app also includes a selection of top sous vide recipes.


For those unfamiliar with sous vide cooking, it's a water bath cooking method that uses precise temperature control to prevent overcooking. The Anova Precision Cooker heats up and circulates water in a pot, evenly cooking food to a precise temperature that's not possible with more traditional cooking methods.

Eli Hodapp, editor-in-chief of our sister site TouchArcade, owns an Anova Precision Cooker and says it's "incredible." He says "everyone should own one" but notes the Wi-Fi and Bluetooth features on newer, more expensive models may not be useful to everyone. With sous vide, the main difference between immersion circulators is the amount of water that can be kept at a precise temperature. Since there's no fear of overcooking, little oversight is needed.

The Anova Wi-Fi Precision Cooker is available from the Apple online store for $199.95. It's also available immediately from a number of Apple Stores across the United States.

Article Link: Anova Wi-Fi Precision Sous Vide Cooker Becomes First Cooking Device Available in Apple Retail Stores
 

qtx43

macrumors 6502a
Aug 4, 2007
659
16
Uhhh, this thing is pretty slim (like a paper towel tube) and you can use it in any pot or polycarb container. No crock pot required. I don't have one but I'm dangerously close to pulling the trigger.
I wouldn't call a paper towel tube slim. But if it works for you, that's great.

You know this is the entire device right? It heats the water and circulates it. It isn't just a thermometer.
You're right, I didn't see that at first, but realized it later. So if you could put it in a huge pot, then it's more workable. Still think it's technology overkill and prefer other solutions.
 

mijail

macrumors 6502a
Oct 31, 2010
556
136
My understanding is your food doesn't actually come in contact with the water. You put the food in containers and the containers go in the water.

The whole thing sounds quite dumb to me. You've replaced the heated air from an oven with heated water in this device. Seems like it would be quite a bit slower than the oven, since the water would take longer to heat than the air.

Even then, it sounds like you've baked your food. Baked steak is okay, but grilled is better.
So, given that your understanding is so poor, what about reading up a bit before passing your opinions?
 

teslo

macrumors 6502a
Jun 9, 2014
928
598
all i can think of is the recent story about WiFi-enabled Barbie being hacked and giving up customer data (and children' voice recordings) because a non-computer manufacturer skimped on encryption techniques to get their product out there. i sense a big mess in the near future as this becomes more common and uninformed consumers buy them up as fast as they're made.
 
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