antenna for eye TV

Discussion in 'Mac Accessories' started by squeeks, Sep 30, 2007.

  1. squeeks macrumors 68040

    squeeks

    Joined:
    Jun 19, 2007
    Location:
    Florida
    #1
    so that i can sit with my laptop on my lap and watch tv with the antenna connected no matter where i am, like a little one that has a 90 degree bend on it or something like that...i looked on amazon, but i didnt see anything, thoughts?
     
  2. MisterMe macrumors G4

    MisterMe

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2002
    Location:
    USA
    #2
    Oh, for Pete's sake. You can buy a TV antenna anywhere. Ever heard of Wal-Mart, Radio Shack, Sears, Circuit City, your corner drugstore, ...? If you think there is a miracle microantenna that will allow you to secretly watch all of your local OTA TV channels while crouched behind a book, then I have some really bad news for you. The physics of RF reception dictates the size of the antenna. VHF has longer wavelength radiation and requires a longer antenna. UHF has shorter wavelength and requires a shorter wavelength. The smallest antenna you will find is a little loop or bowtie UHF antenna, but it won't receive VHF worth crap.
     
  3. squeeks thread starter macrumors 68040

    squeeks

    Joined:
    Jun 19, 2007
    Location:
    Florida
    #3
    yes thankyou:rolleyes:

    i was hoping someone knew of a...how did you put it...miracle antenna, maybe something with a small booster on it or something that might work for me, heck an antenna with a USB powered amplifier would be sweet:D just something that sticks up maybe 10-12 inches, and has a small USB power cord on it, yup, thats what i need
     
  4. MisterMe macrumors G4

    MisterMe

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2002
    Location:
    USA
    #5
    The best antennas are quarter-wave antennas with additional reflectors and directors. The reception elements of a quarter-wave antenna is 1/4 of a wavelength long. I have purchased signal amplifiers to boost the signal. Those seem to work OK. I have also purchased amplified antennas where the electronics were integral to the operation of the antenna. Those, I find, are a waste of money. Currently, I use an amplified RCA rabbit-ears indoor antenna. I also use a passive (unamplified) Terk. The Terk is wonderful for UHF analog and digital. Its reception of even strong VHF signals is poor. The takeaway message is that your antenna's geometry is the critical element of its signal reception. If it is too small, then amplification may help, but it will not help much.
     

Share This Page