Any special tricks needed to install a Windows 7 OEM disc?

Discussion in 'Windows, Linux & Others on the Mac' started by Whackintosh, Dec 11, 2009.

  1. Whackintosh macrumors 6502

    Whackintosh

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    Montreal, Quebec
    #1
    Using Snow Leopard. This would be for both a a late 2009 Imac and a late 2008 MBP. Would the install procedure / experience be exactly the same as if it were a non-OEM disc?
     
  2. balamw Moderator

    balamw

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    New England
    #2
    The only trick is ignoring the terms of the license long enough to perform the install. OEM is not licensed to/for end users, only builders of systems for resale to third parties. Given your username, I must imagine that you don't pay too much attention to the terms of licenses. :p

    Otherwise, for clean installs it is functionally the same as a full retail license. (You can't upgrade over Vista from OEM media).

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  3. ahm macrumors member

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    Feb 14, 2009
    #3
    Terms? If it's illegal, then why can anyone purchase an OEM disc from a place like Newegg?
     
  4. balamw Moderator

    balamw

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    #4
    Because, especially from NewEgg, they could be buying parts of a system that they intend to resell according to the terms of the license?

    It's also for the same reason that you can buy the $29 Snow Leopard Upgrade disc without owning a Mac that runs Leopard.

    License violation =/= illegal.

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  5. ahm macrumors member

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    #5
    It's not illegal to build your own computer and use a single license OEM disc.
     
  6. balamw Moderator

    balamw

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    #6
    That's what I said. Not illegal, but not according to the terms of the license either. Microsoft is quite clear about it.

    http://oem.microsoft.com/script/contentpage.aspx?PageID=563841

    The top bullet is the main change to the license, which makes OEM/SBE the "wrong" license for home "hobbyist" end users and also corporate IT departments. This wasn't the case before Vista SP1.

    Read the license for yourself. http://www.microsoft.com/OEM/SBlicense

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  7. ahm macrumors member

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    Feb 14, 2009
    #7
    I see. I wonder why. It's essentially the same thing. You're building a computer and installing the operating system. In one case, you are selling it to someone else, in the other you're keeping it. Either way, one license can't be transferred to another computer. Besides end user support and what I just said, there seems to be a thin line between OEM and retail, which is why I didn't understand.
     
  8. balamw Moderator

    balamw

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    New England
    #8
    Precisely why Micorosoft is making a big effort to set the licensing record straight since so many of us, myself included, have previously used OEM licenses on home-builds.

    It is really no different from installing a $29 Snow Leopard Upgrade on a system running Tiger. It'll most probably work fine, but it isn't how it's licensed.

    If you're going to ignore the terms of the license anyhow, and it's so easy to clean install from upgrade media, why not just get a retail upgrade license (at least that is licensed to and intended for end users).

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