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Sossity

macrumors 65816
Original poster
May 12, 2010
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I was curious about this, My CS6 is 64 bit. I was told that Hig Sierra was the last most recent os version that could this Adobe CS6 without any issues, or is fully supported.

If High Sierra is the last OS that is fully compatible with Adobe CS6, would I be able to run High Sierra as a virtual machine in Parallels desktop on a newer mac? if not an M1 mac, would a newer intel mac with a newer OS version be able to run High Sierra through Parallels?
 

velocityg4

macrumors 604
Dec 19, 2004
7,330
4,719
Georgia
Try running it in a VM with an older Mac OS. If it works well for you. You can run the old Mac OS and CS6 in a VM and update your Mac to the latest supported OS.

then when you go with M1, M2 and onwards. You can try emulating x86 in QEMU and run an old Mac OS. Running CS6 forever.

I couldn’t say how well it does in a VM or under emulation. You’ll have to find that out yourself.
 

Sossity

macrumors 65816
Original poster
May 12, 2010
1,358
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Try running it in a VM with an older Mac OS. If it works well for you. You can run the old Mac OS and CS6 in a VM and update your Mac to the latest supported OS.

then when you go with M1, M2 and onwards. You can try emulating x86 in QEMU and run an old Mac OS. Running CS6 forever.

I couldn’t say how well it does in a VM or under emulation. You’ll have to find that out yourself.
That is what I was thinking of doing, I was unsure if I can actually run macOS high sierra as a virtual machine.
 

gilby101

macrumors 68030
Mar 17, 2010
2,654
1,418
Tasmania
That is what I was thinking of doing, I was unsure if I can actually run macOS high sierra as a virtual machine.
High Sierra runs fine in a virtual machine on an Intel Mac. Graphics not as fast as you might like. I use VMware Fusion rather than Parallels, but experience would be similar.

But, even if you can get it working, I would expect running High Sierra using a vm with x86 emulation (QEMU/UTM) on an Apple Silicon Mac would be a disaster for a graphics intensive program. Seems to me to be a really good way of encouraging you into an Adobe subscription.

For old Photoshop, I would get the most recent Mac which can run High Sierra without a vm or emulation - iMac 2017. But, if you are going to get a new Mac, money would be better spent on Adobe subscription.
 

Sossity

macrumors 65816
Original poster
May 12, 2010
1,358
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High Sierra runs fine in a virtual machine on an Intel Mac. Graphics not as fast as you might like. I use VMware Fusion rather than Parallels, but experience would be similar.

But, even if you can get it working, I would expect running High Sierra using a vm with x86 emulation (QEMU/UTM) on an Apple Silicon Mac would be a disaster for a graphics intensive program. Seems to me to be a really good way of encouraging you into an Adobe subscription.

For old Photoshop, I would get the most recent Mac which can run High Sierra without a vm or emulation - iMac 2017. But, if you are going to get a new Mac, money would be better spent on Adobe subscription.
Ok, yeah, I do not use the Adobe suite software enough right now to justify paying what feels like a ripoff monthly subscription. I paid a good amount for the CS6 Design suite, and I am not ready to just abandon it just because everything has gone to the subscription model.

As for the iMac, I prefer a desktop with a separate monitor, it is easier to replace one or the other if something goes wrong. With an iMac, if the monitor dies, the whole thing is useless.

For now, I am going with a late 2018 mac mini with Monterey and will run high sierra as a virtual machine.
 

ian87w

macrumors G3
Feb 22, 2020
8,704
12,636
Indonesia
I was curious about this, My CS6 is 64 bit. I was told that Hig Sierra was the last most recent os version that could this Adobe CS6 without any issues, or is fully supported.

If High Sierra is the last OS that is fully compatible with Adobe CS6, would I be able to run High Sierra as a virtual machine in Parallels desktop on a newer mac? if not an M1 mac, would a newer intel mac with a newer OS version be able to run High Sierra through Parallels?
The program is 64bit, but I think the problem is the installer is 32bit. So if you never need to re-install the program and always do in-place OS upgrade, it might work.

Having said that, Mojave still supports 32bit, I think. It's Catalina onwards where it becomes an issue since Apple dropped 32bit support.
 

Sossity

macrumors 65816
Original poster
May 12, 2010
1,358
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The program is 64bit, but I think the problem is the installer is 32bit. So if you never need to re-install the program and always do in-place OS upgrade, it might work.

Having said that, Mojave still supports 32bit, I think. It's Catalina onwards where it becomes an issue since Apple dropped 32bit support.
Ok, thanks for that, I will be installing this CS6 on a virtual mac os machine running either High Sierra, or Mojave. I think it was someone here on this forum that told me that High sierra was the last os to fully support this software.

I looked online and found this; https://discussions.apple.com/thread/8575820, https://community.adobe.com/t5/phot...transferring-cs6-to-new-macbook/td-p/10897771, https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT208436

If I do go to a virtual macOs, should it be High Sierra or Mojave?
 

organicCPU

macrumors 6502a
Aug 8, 2016
832
289
Why not running Mac OS X 10.6.x Snow Leopard or OS X 10.8.x Mountain Lion in a VM to drive Adobe CS6? Even macOS 10.12.x Sierra should give you a better performance than macOS High Sierra or Mojave.

Adobe CS6 doesn't run well on APFS. Beginning with macOS High Sierra it is the standard macOS file system. I recommend HFS+ for Adobe CS6 and you should set up your macOS 10.13+ VM with it.
 
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Sossity

macrumors 65816
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May 12, 2010
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Why not running Mac OS X 10.6.x Snow Leopard or OS X 10.8.x Mountain Lion in a VM to drive Adobe CS6? Even macOS 10.12.x Sierra should give you a better performance than macOS High Sierra or Mojave.

Adobe CS6 doesn't run well on APFS. Beginning with macOS High Sierra it is the standard macOS file system. I recommend HFS+ for Adobe CS6 and you should set up your macOS 10.13+ VM with it.
Ok, you mean have mac OS 10.13+ on my main machine, and then have CS6 in a virtual Machine with something like mountain Lion? I have an install ESD 10.8.5 on a thumb drive, I also have an install Yosemite on a thumb drive, and maybe a mavericks as well, which would be best? and if so how would I go about installing that through parallels desktop?

Edit, I think I might have lost those thumb drives, but I can find one online, a seller has, Mountain Lion, Mavericks, Yosemite, and El Capitan. Which of those would be best to install Adobe CS6 design suite as a virtual machine through patralells.
 
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organicCPU

macrumors 6502a
Aug 8, 2016
832
289
Yes, run whatever macOS fits your needs and then utilize a macOS with the lowest requirements and the smallest footprint to get the best possible result for Adobe CS6.
Always prefer software from the developer:
I have no idea how to get macOS running in Parallels as I use VirtualBox. To get Snow Leopard installed could even be more tricky as most virtualization software makers decided to support OS X Server Snow Leopard only because of some EULA clause from Apple. However, OS X Mountain Lion should run faster in a VM than later OSs and is more stable than OS X Lion.
 
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organicCPU

macrumors 6502a
Aug 8, 2016
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Another way to create bootable installers is DiskMaker X. You'll just need a physical bootable USB thumb drive, if installing it as a native macOS host system on a physical Mac. To install macOS as a guest OS in a VM, at least for VirtualBox an ISO disk had to be created from the installer app. According to this article for Parallels just a valid macOS image should be sufficient.
 

Sossity

macrumors 65816
Original poster
May 12, 2010
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Another way to create bootable installers is DiskMaker X. You'll just need a physical bootable USB thumb drive, if installing it as a native macOS host system on a physical Mac. To install macOS as a guest OS in a VM, at least for VirtualBox an ISO disk had to be created from the installer app. According to this article for Parallels just a valid macOS image should be sufficient.
Ok, thank you for this info, looks like a few more hoops to go through to install a legacy macOS.
 

Diamond Dave

macrumors member
Nov 25, 2008
76
12
Edinburgh, Scotland, UK.
I rarely chime in on forum threads since they can sometimes descend into petty bickering, and they're often filled with poor calibre comments which can be infuriating to read, but this is a topic I have some expertise in.

To the OP - whether you're looking to run CS6 on Mojave - as per your thread title - or on High Sierra - as you mention in your initial post - then, assuming that the Mac in question can happily run one of those OSs natively, there's absolutely no need to run any virtual machines.

Some context. I oversee 10 or so Macs at work which mostly run Mojave but a few still run High Sierra as they're too old to go beyond it. I'll be upgrading those that are able to, to Monterey in the New Year, as part of a department-wide upgrade plan (which involves all sorts of software & some new servers). I also run Mojave on my Mac at home.

Although 5 of the work Macs now run Adobe CC as opposed to CS6, almost all of them originally ran CS6, and a couple of the older Macs still do.

Both High Sierra & Mojave can & do run 32-bit software. Catalina & later OSs can't. So as long as you stick with Mojave or earlier, your 32-bit software should run fine, CS6 included.

FYI the individual components of CS6 aren't all 32-bit. Far from it. Around half of the CS6 "Master Collection" components are 32-bit, and around half are 64-bit.

In detail:

32-bit

Adobe Acrobat X Pro (or XI Pro)
Adobe AIR Settings Manager
Adobe Application Manager
Adobe Audition CS6
Adobe CS6 Service Manager
Adobe Dreamweaver CS6
Adobe Extension Manager CS6
Adobe Fireworks CS6
Adobe Flash CS6
Adobe Flash Builder 4.6
Adobe InDesign CS6

64-bit

Adobe After Effects CS6
Adobe Bridge CS6
Adobe Encore CS6
Adobe Illustrator CS6
Adobe Media Encoder CS6
Adobe Photoshop CS6
Adobe Prelude CS6
Adobe Premiere Pro CS6
Adobe SpeedGrade CS6


I can't give a reference or link to where I found this information, simply because I worked it out for myself, running each & every component (on Mojave) and checking Activity Monitor. So you're just going to have to take my word for it!

It all depends on which applications you need to run, but if you only ever need to run 64-bit ones, then - in theory - you could use an OS newer than Mojave.

Bear in mind though that CS6 hails from 2012, around the time of OS X 10.8 / Mountain Lion, and hasn't had any updates for years, let alone any official support from Adobe. So - other things being equal - the newer the OS that you run CS6 on beyond Mountain Lion, the more potential there is for issues.

For what it's worth though, we used to run Acrobat X Pro, InDesign CS6, Illustrator CS6 & Photoshop CS6 perfectly well on our 2018 Mac Minis (Intel) and 2017 iMacs (Intel) at work - all running Mojave - without any problems whatsoever.

That included Extensis Universal Type Client and its plugins for auto font activation & deactivation. As we're only concerned with design for print at my work, we didn't have any of the other major programs installed.

At home though, until very recently I had everything listed above installed, and all of them ran - mostly without issue - for years.

I'll qualify that by saying that my Premiere developed some corruption a few years ago, and I was unable to sort it (but it doesn't bother me as I've no need to use it any more), and many of the other programs I used very little. In the main though CS6 has played very nicely with Mojave - in my experience at least.

"Your mileage may vary" and all that though, so there's no guarantee that your experience will match mine.

CS6 hasn't been supported for years, and has NEVER had official support under Mojave (or High Sierra) so it's very much a case of "Caveat Emptor".

I hope that helps.
 
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RonPNW

macrumors newbie
Feb 2, 2022
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FYI, I've been running LR CS6 on Catalina for many months with no issues. But you need to install with an older version and upgrade the OS with CS6 already installed.
I would be interested in having a way to run CS6 on an M1 Mac. They are so much faster that even with emulation it might be faster than running on an Intel Mac.
It should be said that CS6 is now very outdated. I'm still using it because it is bought and paid for and most of the new features in LR seem to require more time per image compared to the simpler CS6 (granted with much better results). The new masking features are stellar so I will likely upgrade in the next few months.
Let us know your progress.
Ron
 
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Sossity

macrumors 65816
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May 12, 2010
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I rarely chime in on forum threads since they can sometimes descend into petty bickering, and they're often filled with poor calibre comments which can be infuriating to read, but this is a topic I have some expertise in.

To the OP - whether you're looking to run CS6 on Mojave - as per your thread title - or on High Sierra - as you mention in your initial post - then, assuming that the Mac in question can happily run one of those OSs natively, there's absolutely no need to run any virtual machines.

Some context. I oversee 10 or so Macs at work which mostly run Mojave but a few still run High Sierra as they're too old to go beyond it. I'll be upgrading those that are able to, to Monterey in the New Year, as part of a department-wide upgrade plan (which involves all sorts of software & some new servers). I also run Mojave on my Mac at home.

Although 5 of the work Macs now run Adobe CC as opposed to CS6, almost all of them originally ran CS6, and a couple of the older Macs still do.

Both High Sierra & Mojave can & do run 32-bit software. Catalina & later OSs can't. So as long as you stick with Mojave or earlier, your 32-bit software should run fine, CS6 included.

FYI the individual components of CS6 aren't all 32-bit. Far from it. Around half of the CS6 "Master Collection" components are 32-bit, and around half are 64-bit.

In detail:

32-bit

Adobe Acrobat X Pro (or XI Pro)
Adobe AIR Settings Manager
Adobe Application Manager
Adobe Audition CS6
Adobe CS6 Service Manager
Adobe Dreamweaver CS6
Adobe Extension Manager CS6
Adobe Fireworks CS6
Adobe Flash CS6
Adobe Flash Builder 4.6
Adobe InDesign CS6

64-bit

Adobe After Effects CS6
Adobe Bridge CS6
Adobe Encore CS6
Adobe Illustrator CS6
Adobe Media Encoder CS6
Adobe Photoshop CS6
Adobe Prelude CS6
Adobe Premiere Pro CS6
Adobe SpeedGrade CS6


I can't give a reference or link to where I found this information, simply because I worked it out for myself, running each & every component (on Mojave) and checking Activity Monitor. So you're just going to have to take my word for it!

It all depends on which applications you need to run, but if you only ever need to run 64-bit ones, then - in theory - you could use an OS newer than Mojave.

Bear in mind though that CS6 hails from 2012, around the time of OS X 10.8 / Mountain Lion, and hasn't had any updates for years, let alone any official support from Adobe. So - other things being equal - the newer the OS that you run CS6 on beyond Mountain Lion, the more potential there is for issues.

For what it's worth though, we used to run Acrobat X Pro, InDesign CS6, Illustrator CS6 & Photoshop CS6 perfectly well on our 2018 Mac Minis (Intel) and 2017 iMacs (Intel) at work - all running Mojave - without any problems whatsoever.

That included Extensis Universal Type Client and its plugins for auto font activation & deactivation. As we're only concerned with design for print at my work, we didn't have any of the other major programs installed.

At home though, until very recently I had everything listed above installed, and all of them ran - mostly without issue - for years.

I'll qualify that by saying that my Premiere developed some corruption a few years ago, and I was unable to sort it (but it doesn't bother me as I've no need to use it any more), and many of the other programs I used very little. In the main though CS6 has played very nicely with Mojave - in my experience at least.

"Your mileage may vary" and all that though, so there's no guarantee that your experience will match mine.

CS6 hasn't been supported for years, and has NEVER had official support under Mojave (or High Sierra) so it's very much a case of "Caveat Emptor".

I hope that helps.
Thank you for this breakdown. I was told it does not run well on APFS internal drives, are your computer hard drives in this new format?

I was wondering a bout a virtual machine, since I am aware that mac minis run hot and can have cooling issues. The less strain I put on it with things like running virtual machines, the better.

Have you rub into any installation restrictions? since you are running this app on multiple computers. I thought since Adobe has dropped support for this software are there still restrictions on the number of computers these apps can be installed on?
 

Diamond Dave

macrumors member
Nov 25, 2008
76
12
Edinburgh, Scotland, UK.
Thank you for this breakdown. I was told it does not run well on APFS internal drives, are your computer hard drives in this new format?
Yes they are, or at least most of them are. In detail, we have:

3 Mac minis (Intel, 2018) - APFS - macOS 10.14.6 / Mojave - Adobe Creative Cloud 2021

1 Mac mini (Intel, 2018) - APFS - macOS 10.14.6 / Mojave - Adobe CS6 (Design Standard)

1 Mac mini (Intel, 2018) - APFS - macOS 10.14.6 / Mojave - Adobe Acrobat Reader only

3 iMacs (Intel, 2017) - APFS - macOS 10.14.6 / Mojave - Adobe Creative Cloud 2021

3 iMacs (Intel, 2011) - Mac OS Extended (Journaled) - macOS 10.13.6 / High Sierra - Adobe CS6 (Design Standard)

1 iMac (Intel, 2011) - Mac OS Extended (Journaled) - macOS 10.13.6 / High Sierra - No Adobe software

Then there's also my own, personal Mac I have at home:

1 Mac mini (Intel, 2018) - APFS - macOS 10.14.6 / Mojave - Adobe CS6 (Master Collection)

[I also have the Mac Pro mentioned in my signature, which I no longer use but this ran the exact same combination of software as my home Mac mini - i.e. Mojave (legitimate install due to the Metal-compatible graphics card) on APFS, plus Adobe CS6 (Master Collection).]

The 2011 iMacs can't go beyond High Sierra, and have traditional hard disk drives, as opposed to SSDs, which all the other Macs have / had, including the Mac Pro.

From what I've read - although I have no direct experience of this - APFS tends to suit SSDs, whereas Mac OS Extended (Journaled or otherwise) tends to suit HDDs.

So that's how things sit with the Macs I'm responsible for. The SSD Macs use APFS, and the HDD Macs use Mac OS Extended (Journaled). That's down to how the Macs originally shipped though, and not any decision or action on my part.

What's crucial in your case is precisely what sort of Mac you have, what range of OSs it's capable of running, what precise applications within CS6 you'll wholly (or mostly) be using, and how hard you think you'll "push" those applications.

For example setting type in InDesign or Illustrator is a whole different ball game to compositing complex projects in After Effects.

It's very difficult to help you in a specific way because you've not volunteered several key bits of information that anyone reading this - no matter how expert they are - needs to know. Which comes back to my initial point in my first post about poor calibre posts, unfortunately.

I was wondering a bout a virtual machine, since I am aware that mac minis run hot and can have cooling issues. The less strain I put on it with things like running virtual machines, the better.

Yes they can run hot. The 2 Macs I use at home for example - both are Mac minis (Intel, 2018) - can get quite warm, and because the exhaust vents are right below the ports, the plugs on everything I have connected (e.g. webcam, headset, etc) can be hot to the touch at the end of the day when I shut down & then disconnect them (because I'm taking that Mac into work the next day). None of this is a concern though. These Macs are designed that way. The entire aluminium case is one big heat sink.

Mind you I do very little video work at home these days. Running Premiere / After Effects / Media Encoder will tax the system far more than Illustrator will tend to.

Have you rub into any installation restrictions? since you are running this app on multiple computers. I thought since Adobe has dropped support for this software are there still restrictions on the number of computers these apps can be installed on?

The fact that Adobe has dropped support for CS6 years ago has no bearing whatsoever on how many computers you can install / activate / run CS6 on. Instead it's entirely down to the licence you own.

In our own case, at work we have a 9 user licence (or more accurately a 5 user one and another 4 user one). Each install required a unique serial number. These numbers were provided by our reseller when we bought the software.

As we now only use CS6 on 4 Macs at work, and will be getting rid of it entirely in the next few months, licensing isn't a concern.

With Creative Cloud it's entirely different. For any given single user licence, you can install on unlimited computers, activate on 2 (at the most), and run on one at a time.

As I said previously, letting us know the precise model of Mac, how much RAM it has, whether the boot drive is an HDD or an SSD, which applications you plan to run, and how hard you plan to push them, would help us help you enormously.
 

organicCPU

macrumors 6502a
Aug 8, 2016
832
289
1 Mac mini (Intel, 2018) - APFS - macOS 10.14.6 / Mojave - Adobe CS6 (Design Standard)

1 Mac mini (Intel, 2018) - APFS - macOS 10.14.6 / Mojave - Adobe CS6 (Master Collection)
It's really interesting that Adobe CS6 is performing fine for you on APFS. Did you make any modifications to those installs and what's the version of Photoshop, Illustrator and InDesign you're running?
On a MacBook Pro 2019 I had much problems saving files from Photoshop or using file dialogs in InDesign. I just could get rid of them by using HFS+. After reverting the file system Adobe CS6 ran quite stable. The MacBook Pro still has kernel panics with black screen of death from time to time during certain actions (sometimes opening a .psd file by double clicking on it, if Photoshop is closed). Acrobat Pro XI couldn't save files, even on APFS so that I had to upgrade to Acrobat Pro DC 2017 TLP.
From what I've read - although I have no direct experience of this - APFS tends to suit SSDs, whereas Mac OS Extended (Journaled or otherwise) tends to suit HDDs.
Yes you're right, APFS was made for SSDs. Fortunately HFS+ also works good enough on SSD. Swapping the HDDs with SSDs would give the iMacs 2011 a big performance boost. I took a 27"-inch iMac 2011 to an Apple Certified tech for that, because of the high risk breaking the screen or encapsulating dust behind the glass during a self-repair. The upgrade resulted in a much better disk speed thanks to the 6.0 Gbps Serial ATA connections with the same good system stability.
 

Diamond Dave

macrumors member
Nov 25, 2008
76
12
Edinburgh, Scotland, UK.
It's really interesting that Adobe CS6 is performing fine for you on APFS. Did you make any modifications to those installs and what's the version of Photoshop, Illustrator and InDesign you're running?
On a MacBook Pro 2019 I had much problems saving files from Photoshop or using file dialogs in InDesign. I just could get rid of them by using HFS+. After reverting the file system Adobe CS6 ran quite stable. The MacBook Pro still has kernel panics with black screen of death from time to time during certain actions (sometimes opening a .psd file by double clicking on it, if Photoshop is closed). Acrobat Pro XI couldn't save files, even on APFS so that I had to upgrade to Acrobat Pro DC 2017 TLP.
No, nothing custom or modified about our installations whatsoever.

I patched all the installations to the most up-to-date ones, so:

Adobe Acrobat X Pro - 10.1.16

Adobe InDesign CS6 - 8.1.0.419

Adobe Illustrator CS6 - 16.0.4

Adobe Photoshop CS6 - 13.0.6

We only have licences at work for the "Design Standard" edition - so essentially those 4 programs, and none of the other major ones.

At home though I have the Master Collection, so that includes every CS6 program. Again, all patched to the latest versions.

Yes you're right, APFS was made for SSDs. Fortunately HFS+ also works good enough on SSD. Swapping the HDDs with SSDs would give the iMacs 2011 a big performance boost. I took a 27"-inch iMac 2011 to an Apple Certified tech for that, because of the high risk breaking the screen or encapsulating dust behind the glass during a self-repair. The upgrade resulted in a much better disk speed thanks to the 6.0 Gbps Serial ATA connections with the same good system stability.

Yes I'm aware that swapping the internal HDDS in the 2011 iMacs for SSDs would give a huge performance boost, but all the 2011 Macs are being retired in the next few months anyway. 2 are never used now, one is only used occasionally - so the software it runs is being moved to one of the Mac minis, and the 4th one will be replaced by a new (M1) Mac mini.
 
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organicCPU

macrumors 6502a
Aug 8, 2016
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Adobe InDesign CS6 - 8.1.0.419
Thank you for the info. Really weird why APFS works for you, but not for me.

I patched all apps to the same version you mentioned, except Adobe InDesign CS6, that is at a lower version 8.0.2.413. One of my other earlier installation is at version 8.1.0.419, too. This was patched through CS6 internal updater (Adobe Application Manager). Unfortunately AAM didn't work anymore when I made the installation on the MBP 2019. I guess these update servers were all shut down in 2019. I had a chat with Adobe to get the latest standalone patcher for InDesign CS6, but they said, they don't have it and thus can't give it to me. The Adobe FTP server is still online, but it just has patchers for Photoshop, Illustrator and some other apps available. I'm not sure if there are any stability enhancements or better compatibility with APFS by raising the version to InDesign 8.1.0.419. Mainly, it was announced as an update that gives InDesign CS6 the ability to open InDesign CC .indd files. I think I can live without it, but from time to time, I'm still searching for the original standalone patcher.

Yes I'm aware that swapping the internal HDDS in the 2011 iMacs for SSDs would give a huge performance boost, but all the 2011 Macs are being retired in the next few months anyway
Then your personal Mac collection will have an addition to the family soon :)
 

Diamond Dave

macrumors member
Nov 25, 2008
76
12
Edinburgh, Scotland, UK.
Thank you for the info. Really weird why APFS works for you, but not for me.

I patched all apps to the same version you mentioned, except Adobe InDesign CS6, that is at a lower version 8.0.2.413. One of my other earlier installation is at version 8.1.0.419, too. This was patched through CS6 internal updater (Adobe Application Manager). Unfortunately AAM didn't work anymore when I made the installation on the MBP 2019. I guess these update servers were all shut down in 2019. I had a chat with Adobe to get the latest standalone patcher for InDesign CS6, but they said, they don't have it and thus can't give it to me. The Adobe FTP server is still online, but it just has patchers for Photoshop, Illustrator and some other apps available. I'm not sure if there are any stability enhancements or better compatibility with APFS by raising the version to InDesign 8.1.0.419. Mainly, it was announced as an update that gives InDesign CS6 the ability to open InDesign CC .indd files. I think I can live without it, but from time to time, I'm still searching for the original standalone patcher.
My experience has been similar with Adobe Application Manager.

I have an InDesign updater called "AdobeInDesign8Patch-All (8.0.2).dmg" which is 142.7 MB. I've never been able to get it to run successfully though.

On my personal Mac at least, running the "AdobePatchInstaller.app" in the volume that it mounts, starts up Adobe Application Manager (version 10.0.0.49, which is from 2015).

It immediately generates an error dialogue on launch though (see attachment).

I can send you the file via wetransfer.com if you'd like, but I very much doubt it'll work, for you or anyone else, as I think your theory about Adobe's update servers is correct. This patch likely "phone's home" before it does anything else, and when it doesn't get the correct reply, it refuses to run.

Then your personal Mac collection will have an addition to the family soon :)
No I'm afraid not. All the company equipment belongs to the company. I'm just an employee. I'm allowed to take home things that I need to do my job, but as a loan, not as a gift. The retired Macs will have their HDDs crushed by our IT department, then they'll just languish in storage somewhere on-site.

And besides, I have too much old Mac kit at home that I want rid of. The last thing I need is more of it cluttering the place up. Especially an iMac, as I've never liked them.
 

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organicCPU

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It immediately generates an error dialogue on launch though (see attachment).
Yes, that error report was already there in back in 2019. That was the moment I contacted Adobe Support. They sent me the main installers they had, but told me they have no update patches. It should likely be a DMG file, something like "AdobeInDesign8-1-mul-AdobeUpdate.dmg" would follow their naming conventions.
And besides, I have too much old Mac kit at home that I want rid of.
I know that kind of problem, even though an old iMac running iTunes is a nice jukebox…
 
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