Anyone buying Google Glass on April 15?

xraydoc

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Oct 9, 2005
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So the Google Glass Explorer Edition is being sold to the public for one day only on Tuesday, April 15. Costs $1500 (same as current developer/explorer price).

Anyone have any notion to buy one. I'm thinking of it. I may even be able to get a paper out of it (usage in a medical imaging setting).
 

maflynn

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I see little need and I have little desire to spend that much money something that has limited appeal to me.
 

SandboxGeneral

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Nope. I don't see a need for it, nor do I really have a want for it - especially for the price. It's a neat device to be sure though.
 

0007776

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I really don't see the point in it except for using it to take pictures of people without them knowing, and you could get an SLR with a long lens for not much more and just hide in some bushes to do that instead.
 

xraydoc

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Yeah, I'm looking at it from an academic point of view. For strictly personal stuff I wouldn't need it. But from a medical research perspective, it might be interesting.
 

rhinosrcool

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Sep 5, 2009
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No, even though I like new technology, these things are creepy. Yes, today, I realize there isn't a lot of privacy. But , these things go too far. In the future, people could (and probably will) irreparably harm someone's reputation with tweaking of their public information.
 

maflynn

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Except there are plenty of applications where you might not be able to use your hands.
Please define such, If you're unable to use your hands to research something, then perhaps its not the proper place to be researching. I can think of driving to be a great example.

Perhaps I'm being narrow minded so what examples did you have in mind?
 

T'hain Esh Kelch

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I see the potential for when working in a laboratory, but not an early-adopter-1500$-potential. Not in any way.

Let me pull up protocols on the fly and note results, then yes.
 

kdarling

macrumors P6
I really don't see the point in it except for using it to take pictures of people without them knowing, and you could get an SLR with a long lens for not much more and just hide in some bushes to do that instead.
Google should add a recording light just to quell the fears of people who've never seen Glass before. However, the display already lights up, which is a hint.

Watch this Glass review and see her example of "secret filming" at around 2:25. There's also a hilarious part at 3:00 when her boyfriend figures out something, and you'll see it light up taking a picture. Keep watching and she'll give more examples right after.


Except there are plenty of applications where you might not be able to use your hands.
Yep. For example, a field technician or researcher might be up a ladder or pole, and need to do / ask about something.

I believe there's a surgeon who's used it already to record pieces of an operation for others to see.

In general, Glass is not quite what most people think. It's not virtual reality or anything like that. It's a very simple device, using mostly card info like Google Now, or the upcoming Google wearable stuff like the Moto 360.
 

maflynn

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Yep. For example, a field technician or researcher might be up a ladder or pole, and need to do / ask about something.\
Perhaps but do you really want to be so distracted on researching something while up on a ladder? I don't think that would be too safe.

Likewise if you're researcher with gloves on mixing compounds or chemicals - have your attention diverted may not be the best course of action.
 

kdarling

macrumors P6
Perhaps but do you really want to be so distracted on researching something while up on a ladder? I don't think that would be too safe.
I've been doing field apps for coming up on twenty years. Wearable computing has always been a desire, whether hands on or off.

Previously we used just voice control. Example: telephone worker up a pole, needs to know which lines are free to reuse, vocally asks for a list and it's read back. With Glass, the same thing, except they can see the list as well IF THEY WISH.

Hmm. Perhaps some people do not realize that the display is NOT in front of your eye. It's just above the normal line of sight. It doesn't block your straight ahead vision.

Likewise if you're researcher with gloves on mixing compounds or chemicals - have your attention diverted may not be the best course of action.
Obviously if you're in a job where any distraction is bad, you wouldn't be wearing one :)

Like anything, it's not a device that fits in every situation. However, it's just silly to broadly claim that there's no use for it at all, or that it's less safe. It can be safer (and more convenient) than taking a hand off a handhold or a piece of equipment in order to pull out a separate display device.
 

mattbaar26

macrumors regular
Jan 15, 2013
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I think it's a great idea, it seems like everyone dissing it here is afraid of what it can do, it would be interesting to see all of your replies once apple comes out with something similar to this.

The point of glass isn't to take pictures of people...
 

0007776

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Google should add a recording light just to quell the fears of people who've never seen Glass before. However, the display already lights up, which is a hint.

Watch this Glass review and see her example of "secret filming" at around 2:25. There's also a hilarious part at 3:00 when her boyfriend figures out something, and you'll see it light up taking a picture. Keep watching and she'll give more examples right after.
It isn't too hard to change that...
 

0000757

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Dec 16, 2011
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Google Glass is a great application. It has many uses but honestly most of those uses I think go beyond consumer/prosumers and are better suited in business.

The application of Google Glass is better suited for the heavy duty workers, scientists doing research, etc. I don't think Google Glass is ready nor needed for daily life, especially with projects like the Pebble, Galaxy Gear, Android Wear, iWatch, etc. that can fill the gap in a more cost-effective, efficient manner.

My main issue is with how many people are going to buy this DEVELOPER device and then run online to complain about it's issues. Google Glass Explorer Edition is NOT a consumer device. By letting anyone buy it, Google is saying "Yeah it's ready!" and it's definitely not.

I'd rather wait for the Moto 360 instead of Google Glass.
 

Jessica Lares

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Oct 31, 2009
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The price tag is so high, that I think we will see less abuse than if it was something people could get for $500 or less. So while I agree with chrf097, that there will be some people buying this and trying to use it as a daily driver, this will be less of an issue then people flashing half working ROMs on their device.

I'm not interested either. I already hate wearing glasses as it is, plus I'm legally blind in one eye/totally blind in the other.
 

spinedoc77

macrumors G3
Jun 11, 2009
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It's way too expensive for what it does, but that's how technology works. In a couple of years it will be $499. Still, even if it was cheaper I wouldn't buy one. It looks horribly ridiculous. It doesn't fit very well. I had a chance to try out my brothers (which sits in one of his dusty drawers doing nothing) and it didn't impress me in the least. At least with smartwatches you can make a case for owning one, but I just can't see anyone needing one of these.
 

Smeehehe

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Apr 9, 2014
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Please define such, If you're unable to use your hands to research something, then perhaps its not the proper place to be researching. I can think of driving to be a great example.

Perhaps I'm being narrow minded so what examples did you have in mind?
Rock climbing. Swimming.
 

0007776

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Rock climbing.
I would never go climbing with someone who is trying to use something like Google Glass, I value my life too much. That is a situation where you should be paying attention to what you are doing, and I can't imagine any situation where you would need to look something up as you were either climbing or belaying. Using Google glass there would end with someone getting killed or severely injured.