Other Anyone else fed up with so many considerations when choosing an iPhone these days?

NewBench

macrumors regular
Original poster
Jun 24, 2010
176
119
So I've had many iPhones over the years - 4/4S/5/5S/6/6+/6S/7 and the first gen SE which I had up until recently.

Decided it was time to upgrade to something with FaceID so bought a used X. Loved the bigger screen, but found FaceID not as reliable as TouchID.

Returned it and bought a new 2020 SE instead. Great to have TouchID back, but damn it's a lot heavier than the first gen SE and a similar weight to the X. Battery life isn't as good as I hoped for.

I'm missing the size, weight and simplicity of the first gen SE and seriously thinking about going back to that.

I guess the bottom line is, there are just too many factors to consider with a smartphone these days. I spend way too much time thinking about how the phone is to 'live with', battery life, an appropriate case/screen protector, insurance, AppleCare, how long the phone will last, the timing of new phone releases and many other factors. It's got a lil silly.

Main things that seem to come up time and time again:

Weight - I'm a guy and always keep my phone in a front pocket and the newer ones just feel like they are dragging me down. They also feel like if they drop, that weight is going to increase the amount of damage.

Price - $1k+ for a flagship phone?! Sure the price might be justified in terms of component/build costs but for something so easily damaged, the fact an out of warranty screen repair on an OLED is like $250-$300+ is crazy. I know insurance is a thing, as is AppleCare, but both are additional substantial costs on top of the up front cost.

Size - I have small(ish) hands and always prefer one-handed phone usage. A 6S/7/8/SE2 is about the upper limit of what I can tolerate and it seems Apple and others are definitely going the way of large handsets/screens. The only bright light seems to be the rumored smaller iPhone 12.

Extra costs - I know they're not mandatory, but things like a screen protector and case are an almost necessity when really the phone should be constructed in a way that takes the likelihood of drops/damage into consideration more than it already does. Gorilla Glass just isn't good enough.

Then, before you know it, boom it's September again and people almost feel obliged to upgrade just to have the 'latest' phone when most of the time it has trivial improvements.



I would love an iPhone that is light, not prone to damage with every drop (I'd happily take a fully plastic iPhone right now!), doesn't cost a ton, can be used comfortably with one hand and will be supported with iOS updates for the next few years. I don't care about increasing megapixels on a camera, or luxury/high end materials that are expensive to repair.

I know not everyone feels the same and people are happy to have all of the things I've complained about, but does anyone else feel the same or similar?

For those of us over 30, I remember how simple things were in the days of Nokia/Blackberry/Sony Ericsson. Capable phones, sturdy build quality, comfortably one handed use, long battery life etc and didn't cost $1k for a flagship phone.

It just feels like we spend so much time thinking about/obsessing over iPhones - how to protect it, whether its going to break/fail or be supported by iOS, battery life, cost etc and forgetting about the rest of life.
 

nicho

macrumors 68040
Feb 15, 2008
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Then, before you know it, boom it's September again and people almost feel obliged to upgrade just to have the 'latest' phone when most of the time it has trivial improvements.
Is this your problem or a commentary on other people's problems?

If it's the latter, why care about others' "problems"? If it's your problem - well, it's not hard to fix it. Just don't upgrade, like you clearly stopped doing after getting the iPhone 7 and then downgrading to the original SE.
 

NewBench

macrumors regular
Original poster
Jun 24, 2010
176
119
lol glass is glass and gorilla glass is fine. You’re going to break glass if it falls from a certain height no matter how good it is.
Small point out of my entire post but okay. My point was the phone is easily breakable for something so expensive. It's 2020, you would think technology would have figured out a way to make glass or a material resistant to most drops that could be used in a phone display.

Instead, it's almost mandatory to fit a screen protector or accept micro scratches or worse. Yet when it comes to resale people complain that there are microscratches on a phone screen if it hasn't had a screen protector. Like, what are you expecting, it's a phone screen?


- - Post merged: - -

Is this your problem or a commentary on other people's problems?

If it's the latter, why care about others' "problems"? If it's your problem - well, it's not hard to fix it. Just don't upgrade, like you clearly stopped doing after getting the iPhone 7 and then downgrading to the original SE.
Both. I've seen other people complain about/comment on this and it's something I consider too.
 

Closingracer

macrumors 68040
Jul 13, 2010
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Small point out of my entire post but okay. My point was the phone is easily breakable for something so expensive. It's 2020, you would think technology would have figured out a way to make glass or a material resistant to most drops that could be used in a phone display.
Umm You’re asking for the impossible. It’s Glass period. Stop. There that’s it. Glass WILL break no matter what. Gorilla glass is meant to strengthen the glass where it doesn’t shatter to pieces once it does drop. Sapphire glass has better scratch resistance but can break easier thus part of the reason why Apple Watch a used sapphire glas but on the sport ones use reg glass
 

NewBench

macrumors regular
Original poster
Jun 24, 2010
176
119
Umm You’re asking for the impossible. It’s Glass period. Stop. There that’s it. Glass WILL break no matter what. Gorilla glass is meant to strengthen the glass where it doesn’t shatter to pieces once it does drop. Sapphire glass has better scratch resistance but can break easier thus part of the reason why Apple Watch a used sapphire glas but on the sport ones use reg glass
It's not impossible, it's just not happened yet and technology hasn't reached that level. In a lab somewhere they've probably even got something close to unbreakable it'll just be years before we see it in a consumer product. Gorilla glass compared to early phone glass is greatly more durable, but still not unbreakable. It will happen at some point, I'm just disappointed we aren't at that level yet. Obviously companies have an interest in making things replaceable as it means they can charge for it.

Flexible/bendable glass was "impossible" a decade ago - now we see rollable glass screens, flexible displays etc.
 
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nicho

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Feb 15, 2008
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Both. I've seen other people complain about/comment on this and it's something I consider too.
Well, I don't understand why other people complaining about this would be a "consideration" when choosing a phone. And as to yourself - it's a manufactured problem (of your own making) that hasn't really got a solution beyond saying "snap out of it". The phone you want doesn't exist, much like the obligation to get a new one every year doesn't. Keep the phone you're most comfortable with (the trade-off between the new SE's downsides to you and the old SE's lack of iOS updates) as long as you need to/can, and then upgrade. Three or four years of trivial improvements will add up to a greater whole at that point.
 

NewBench

macrumors regular
Original poster
Jun 24, 2010
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Maybe you bought too many iPhone. Personally I went 4S, 6S, 11 Pro.

Even though I had the money every year to buy the newest one, I felt the gap between each iteration was not worth until I moved from +3 or +4 versions. Bonus point: I feel I enjoy more my 11 Pro, coming from a 6S.
I mean...the gap between say an iPhone 4 and an iPhone X would be hugely worth it if you value improvements in technical aspects. I love the technology of the newer phones (OLED, better cameras etc), but I value reliability and durability far more.

Like I said in the OP, when I used to buy a Nokia or a Blackberry I wouldn't be thinking - okay first step I need to buy insurance or AppleCare, then a screen protector, then a case and then I need to treat it like it's a valuable diamond and make sure I don't drop it once for the entire time I own it.
- - Post merged: - -

Well, I don't understand why other people complaining about this would be a "consideration" when choosing a phone. And as to yourself - it's a manufactured problem (of your own making) that hasn't really got a solution beyond saying "snap out of it". The phone you want doesn't exist, much like the obligation to get a new one every year doesn't. Keep the phone you're most comfortable with (the trade-off between the new SE's downsides to you and the old SE's lack of iOS updates) as long as you need to/can, and then upgrade. Three or four years of trivial improvements will add up to a greater whole at that point.
I didn't say other people's considerations about upgrading were a consideration of mine - I just said that I'm not the only one that thinks that way. I couldn't care less what other people actually do - but I am interested in whether others are sick of having so many things to consider when buying a phone compared to buying a phone 10-15 years ago.

I guess one thing it boils down to is - I hate using screen protectors and cases, but I don't want to dread dropping my phone even a single time during my ownership of it.

I'd happily use an iPhone 5 now due to how cheap they are used if Apple still supported it with iOS updates as if I did drop it or damage it, then replacing it would be cost effective.
 

nicho

macrumors 68040
Feb 15, 2008
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Flexible/bendable glass was "impossible" a decade ago - now we see rollable glass screens, flexible displays etc.
Actually, not so:


Like I said in the OP, when I used to buy a Nokia or a Blackberry I wouldn't be thinking - okay first step I need to buy insurance or AppleCare, then a screen protector, then a case and then I need to treat it like it's a valuable diamond and make sure I don't drop it once for the entire time I own it.
Case and not dropping it, fair enough (though with a good case then you don't need to worry about that...) but come on. There's a reason you didn't need a screen protector back then, the screens were made of plastic and tiny - and usually recessed into chunky plastic frames. Phone insurance has also been a thing for a very long time, so while you might not have felt that need with a blackberry I know a good many people did.
- - Post merged: - -

I didn't say other people's considerations about upgrading were a consideration of mine - I just said that I'm not the only one that thinks that way. I couldn't care less what other people actually do - but I am interested in whether others are sick of having so many things to consider when buying a phone compared to buying a phone 10-15 years ago.

I guess one thing it boils down to is - I hate using screen protectors and cases, but I don't want to dread dropping my phone even a single time during my ownership of it.

I'd happily use an iPhone 5 now due to how cheap they are used if Apple still supported it with iOS updates as if I did drop it or damage it, then replacing it would be cost effective.
It honestly sounds like the technology has gone beyond your needs and that's scared you a bit, for want of a better word. There's a reason you didn't have all these other considerations (I'm still confused whether you're complaining about considerations in choice or considerations of other things you have to do beyond just buying the phone) with Nokia phones and Blackberries - the same reason they're no longer sold. They were dumb phones and technologically inferior to today's. And often much fatter than an iPhone with a case on.

Not everyone needs a flagship phone, and that's OK. But you're going on as if they shouldn't exist and we should carry 3310s around in our pockets.
 

NewBench

macrumors regular
Original poster
Jun 24, 2010
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@nicho it seems as though you are trying to find holes in my argument wherever possible. Okay so I said flexible glass wasn't possible 10 years ago and it was....let's say a hundred years ago. You get the point I'm trying to make - that things once deemed impossible became possible. Let's not get into semantics for the sake of it.

As for the rest of your reply - I am not afraid of technology, far from it. I'm just saying that there are far too many things to think about and I (and it appears others) spend so much time and energy thinking about issues that just shouldn't be a major consideration.

I'm not saying nobody should have a flagship phone and they shouldn't make them - I just think they put too much emphasis on technology and features rather than solving durability issues (the only thing they've really improved the last couple of years is water resistance). We use these things multiple times a day, every day.

IMO Apple and others have let technology overtake the practicalities of the real world. They'll launch a shiny new $1k phone with an OLED display, glass back and metal frame but don't appreciate that if you drop that thing just once (very likely in years of ownership), you'll likely heavily damage it. Some people might say well the same thing applies to cars and car crashes, but it's just not the same - I've crashed my car once in 15 years of driving (and that was when I was very inexperienced), yet I drop my phone at least a couple of times a year even though I'm actively aware of the risk.
 

nicho

macrumors 68040
Feb 15, 2008
3,399
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@nicho it seems as though you are trying to find holes in my argument wherever possible. Okay so I said flexible glass wasn't possible 10 years ago and it was....let's say a hundred years ago. You get the point I'm trying to make - that things once deemed impossible became possible. Let's not get into semantics for the sake of it.

As for the rest of your reply - I am not afraid of technology, far from it. I'm just saying that there are far too many things to think about and I (and it appears others) spend so much time and energy thinking about issues that just shouldn't be a major consideration.

IMO Apple and others have let technology overtake the practicalities of the real world. They'll launch a shiny new $1k phone with an OLED display, glass back and metal frame but don't appreciate that if you drop that thing just once (very likely in years of ownership), you'll likely heavily damage it. Some people might say well the same thing applies to cars and car crashes, but it's just not the same - I've crashed my car once in 15 years of driving (and that was when I was very inexperienced), yet I drop my phone at least a couple of times a year even though I'm actively aware of the risk.
If it isn't abundantly clear by now, I agree with the bolded text. The answer is to stop.
 
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NewBench

macrumors regular
Original poster
Jun 24, 2010
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If it isn't abundantly clear by now, I agree with the bolded text. The answer is to stop.
No it wasn't abundantly clear when you replied to various points I made. Why spend several replies and multiple paragraphs replying to various points if I should have seen it in the first place?
 

russell_314

macrumors 65816
Feb 10, 2019
1,365
1,860
USA
So I've had many iPhones over the years - 4/4S/5/5S/6/6+/6S/7 and the first gen SE which I had up until recently.

Decided it was time to upgrade to something with FaceID so bought a used X. Loved the bigger screen, but found FaceID not as reliable as TouchID.

Returned it and bought a new 2020 SE instead. Great to have TouchID back, but damn it's a lot heavier than the first gen SE and a similar weight to the X. Battery life isn't as good as I hoped for.

I'm missing the size, weight and simplicity of the first gen SE and seriously thinking about going back to that.

I guess the bottom line is, there are just too many factors to consider with a smartphone these days. I spend way too much time thinking about how the phone is to 'live with', battery life, an appropriate case/screen protector, insurance, AppleCare, how long the phone will last, the timing of new phone releases and many other factors. It's got a lil silly.

Main things that seem to come up time and time again:

Weight - I'm a guy and always keep my phone in a front pocket and the newer ones just feel like they are dragging me down. They also feel like if they drop, that weight is going to increase the amount of damage.

Price - $1k+ for a flagship phone?! Sure the price might be justified in terms of component/build costs but for something so easily damaged, the fact an out of warranty screen repair on an OLED is like $250-$300+ is crazy. I know insurance is a thing, as is AppleCare, but both are additional substantial costs on top of the up front cost.

Size - I have small(ish) hands and always prefer one-handed phone usage. A 6S/7/8/SE2 is about the upper limit of what I can tolerate and it seems Apple and others are definitely going the way of large handsets/screens. The only bright light seems to be the rumored smaller iPhone 12.

Extra costs - I know they're not mandatory, but things like a screen protector and case are an almost necessity when really the phone should be constructed in a way that takes the likelihood of drops/damage into consideration more than it already does. Gorilla Glass just isn't good enough.

Then, before you know it, boom it's September again and people almost feel obliged to upgrade just to have the 'latest' phone when most of the time it has trivial improvements.



I would love an iPhone that is light, not prone to damage with every drop (I'd happily take a fully plastic iPhone right now!), doesn't cost a ton, can be used comfortably with one hand and will be supported with iOS updates for the next few years. I don't care about increasing megapixels on a camera, or luxury/high end materials that are expensive to repair.

I know not everyone feels the same and people are happy to have all of the things I've complained about, but does anyone else feel the same or similar?

For those of us over 30, I remember how simple things were in the days of Nokia/Blackberry/Sony Ericsson. Capable phones, sturdy build quality, comfortably one handed use, long battery life etc and didn't cost $1k for a flagship phone.

It just feels like we spend so much time thinking about/obsessing over iPhones - how to protect it, whether its going to break/fail or be supported by iOS, battery life, cost etc and forgetting about the rest of life.
That's a long post to say "I wish Apple would make the original size iPhone SE". Rumor has it that they might be making a smaller phone than the current SE but it won't be exactly the same as the original. It's all about what people want and while everyone wouldn't mind a smaller phone in their pocket many people use their phone for things other than calls and texts so the smaller screen makes that difficult. As you noticed a smaller phone means a smaller battery. This is a big negative when people use their phones more today.

As to "boom it's September again and people almost feel obliged to upgrade just to have the 'latest' phone when most of the time it has trivial improvements" My question is what causes you to have these feelings? Do you buy the latest car every year when it comes out? Every year they come out with a new model and most of the time it's just trivial improvements. I guess maybe celebrities do this but I don't think most people do. I see this brought up a lot and always wondered why people felt the need. I don't think it's peer pressure because I've never had friends say "oh man you're still using last years phone?". I'm older but maybe younger people like teenagers have this issue.
 

Nguyen Duc Hieu

macrumors regular
Jul 5, 2020
105
12
Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam
For me it's fairly simple:
One iphone 4S to handle the call/SMS, e-wallet, torch-light, compass, calculator, sound pressure meter.....
One Airpad Pro for everything else.
Why bother using a tiny iPhone of all sizes to do something an Airpad Pro can do better, and more beautiful?
 

Spudlicious

macrumors 6502a
Nov 21, 2015
561
356
Bedfordshire, England
So I've had many iPhones over the years - 4/4S/5/5S/6/6+/6S/7 and the first gen SE which I had up until recently.

Decided it was time to upgrade to something with FaceID so bought a used X. Loved the bigger screen, but found FaceID not as reliable as TouchID.

Returned it and bought a new 2020 SE instead. Great to have TouchID back, but damn it's a lot heavier than the first gen SE and a similar weight to the X. Battery life isn't as good as I hoped for.

I'm missing the size, weight and simplicity of the first gen SE and seriously thinking about going back to that.

I guess the bottom line is, there are just too many factors to consider with a smartphone these days. I spend way too much time thinking about how the phone is to 'live with', battery life, an appropriate case/screen protector, insurance, AppleCare, how long the phone will last, the timing of new phone releases and many other factors. It's got a lil silly.

Main things that seem to come up time and time again:

Weight - I'm a guy and always keep my phone in a front pocket and the newer ones just feel like they are dragging me down. They also feel like if they drop, that weight is going to increase the amount of damage.

Price - $1k+ for a flagship phone?! Sure the price might be justified in terms of component/build costs but for something so easily damaged, the fact an out of warranty screen repair on an OLED is like $250-$300+ is crazy. I know insurance is a thing, as is AppleCare, but both are additional substantial costs on top of the up front cost.

Size - I have small(ish) hands and always prefer one-handed phone usage. A 6S/7/8/SE2 is about the upper limit of what I can tolerate and it seems Apple and others are definitely going the way of large handsets/screens. The only bright light seems to be the rumored smaller iPhone 12.

Extra costs - I know they're not mandatory, but things like a screen protector and case are an almost necessity when really the phone should be constructed in a way that takes the likelihood of drops/damage into consideration more than it already does. Gorilla Glass just isn't good enough.

Then, before you know it, boom it's September again and people almost feel obliged to upgrade just to have the 'latest' phone when most of the time it has trivial improvements.



I would love an iPhone that is light, not prone to damage with every drop (I'd happily take a fully plastic iPhone right now!), doesn't cost a ton, can be used comfortably with one hand and will be supported with iOS updates for the next few years. I don't care about increasing megapixels on a camera, or luxury/high end materials that are expensive to repair.

I know not everyone feels the same and people are happy to have all of the things I've complained about, but does anyone else feel the same or similar?

For those of us over 30, I remember how simple things were in the days of Nokia/Blackberry/Sony Ericsson. Capable phones, sturdy build quality, comfortably one handed use, long battery life etc and didn't cost $1k for a flagship phone.

It just feels like we spend so much time thinking about/obsessing over iPhones - how to protect it, whether its going to break/fail or be supported by iOS, battery life, cost etc and forgetting about the rest of life.
So many considerations? That choice is the glory of the garden. But nice moaning, you're well on the way to joining the grumpy old man brigade! I'm a member of long standing.

It's far better, in my view, to have bewildering choice than no choice, better to view a vast array of options than to be faced with 'that's it, take it or leave it.'

And fragility? I also had mobiles (cellphones) in the nineties and noughties, and I don't remember them always surviving drops well; sometimes they did, sometimes they flew apart, one Nokia I dropped looked perfect but the earpiece never made another sound. The wretched little plastic screens scratched as easy as anything, the monochrome ones lost contrast and became hard to read, and the devices didn't do much, did they? Calls, SMS, and a game of snake, that's what you got.

Protection obsession is nothing new. When I got my first and only Blackberry, a Bold 9700, I wouldn't leave the house with it until I'd received an OtterBox (that brand was really big before iPhones came along) case and a screen protector film from Amazon. You remember those plastic films? Fiendishly difficult to apply and you were lucky if they weren't as wrinkled as a scrotum. The modern glass screen protector with its alignment frame is a joy to fit by comparison.

Count your blessings, for we live in an age of wonder. It is an amazing fact that we can buy pocket devices that allow us to communicate with any other person on the planet, run an almost infinite variety of applications, take incredibly detailed photos, connect to an internet offering possibilities beyond the dreams of our grandfathers; all that, and it's possible to buy such a device for less than fifty pounds/dollars. I'll live with the chore of choosing, for isn't studying what's available a big part of enjoying the technology of our day?
 

johannnn

macrumors 68000
Nov 20, 2009
1,683
1,186
Sweden
The old Nokia phones were thick as ****, and the display was like 3 rows of content. Of course it was durable. You can buy some NASA grade cover to your phone and it will still be thinner than an old Nokia phone.

And why think so much about the choices? All phones are good nowadays, no need to constantly argue if you have the right one or not.

Regarding September events, why would any sane person think “they need” to upgrade? Do they do that for everything in the
if life? Cars, refrigerator, shoes etc etc. Must be an expensive lifestyle.
 
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GrumpyMom

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Sep 11, 2014
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Well, I do sometimes miss the simplicity of the early days when we could just decide between black or white, and how much storage. There was no fear of missing out on a better size for your hand or a better camera outside of your size or price range. You knew the phone in your hand was pretty much the same as the one Steve Jobs himself was using. Cost of ownership was reasonable, too.

So yeah I get what you’re saying. And these days, even though I make an entertaining hobby out of obsessing over the very things you’re complaining about, yeah, I do remember the happiest I have ever been with an iPhone was back when I my iPhone 4. I stayed with it for close to 3 years, if I remember correctly. My husband kind of pushed me to trading it for a 5s, and I regretted it.

The 4 did have a glass back. Oddly enough I didn’t know. It never would have occurred to me anyone would be stupid enough to make something that most people casually tossed around out of glass. So I assumed it was some kind of polycarbonate. Lol. I didn’t used to read about iPhones in those days. I read about most other technology and knew a lot about my Treo. But somehow didn’t think there was much to read about an iPhone

By some miracle, mine survived unscathed, despite several drops and no protection of any kind. I didn’t bother with cases until my iPhone 6 Plus.

In a way I am enjoying a taste of that old simplicity with my SE2. I know by now that I tend to favor Caudabe clear cases, so that is what I have. I decided to skip the screen protector for now because I don’t like the ones I’d tried.

But no, I don’t want to give up the variety we are offered now. I appreciate the array of choices.
 
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eyoungren

macrumors Core
Aug 31, 2011
22,228
14,955
ten-zero-eleven-zero-zero by zero-two
My phone purchase considerations.

1. Do I like how it looks?
2. Does it make phone calls?
3. Can I text?
4. Can I do light web browsing?

If a phone meets those four criteria I will buy it. If I REALLY like a phone, I will purchase the maximum capacity available and the specific model/color I want - even if it means waiting for it.

I use my phones without cases. I have long ago developed habits that protect my phone. Yes, there have been drops, but only once in the last eight years since buying iPhone have I cracked a screen from a drop.

My phone is a tool, so no screen protector. You're going to get scratches. For me, it gives the phone character. It tells me the device is being used for its purpose as the designers intended it to be. I am not hauling around a museum piece. Also, we (my wife and I) do not sell our phones so there is zero incentive to keep the phone pristine for resale. That said, we do not abuse our phones.

That's about it for me.
 

igroeg

macrumors regular
Feb 22, 2019
133
130
My biggest concern when buying an iPhone is winning the OLED lottery. Crappy displays do exist out there.

The second major thing is Wi-Fi/LTE connectivity. Hopefully we’ll be set from this year onwards (Qualcomm).
 

GrumpyMom

macrumors G3
Sep 11, 2014
8,728
12,439
My phone purchase considerations.

1. Do I like how it looks?
2. Does it make phone calls?
3. Can I text?
4. Can I do light web browsing?

If a phone meets those four criteria I will buy it. If I REALLY like a phone, I will purchase the maximum capacity available and the specific model/color I want - even if it means waiting for it.

I use my phones without cases. I have long ago developed habits that protect my phone. Yes, there have been drops, but only once in the last eight years since buying iPhone have I cracked a screen from a drop.

My phone is a tool, so no screen protector. You're going to get scratches. For me, it gives the phone character. It tells me the device is being used for its purpose as the designers intended it to be. I am not hauling around a museum piece. Also, we (my wife and I) do not sell our phones so there is zero incentive to keep the phone pristine for resale. That said, we do not abuse our phones.

That's about it for me.
I don’t put screen protectors on my Switch or my iPad mini. Probably because I run my ipads until they no longer run well. I did trade in an older mini on the mini I have now but it was in great shape despite me not trying too hard. I do use a case with the cover because it makes the iPad easier to hold and shut off (closes like a book).

My iPhones up to iPhone 6 Plus did have scratches nicks because I preferred to not use cases with the exception of putting a wallet case on occasionally. Back then I traded in at AT&T store and got about $100 toward the new iPhone. That was sufficient because iPhones didn’t used to cost more than my laptop and my desktop combined.
- - Post merged: - -

geeze- another "I cant make up my mind" thread.
Another "too many choices' thread.
I wonder how these people order food from a menu or buy anything online.
Ah it’s just making conversation. That’s what we are here for. Easy to skip the topics we don’t like. I don’t normally participate in a discussion like this but to be honest, it’s something I was thinking about myself, how much things have changed with iPhone offerings. They’ve naturally evolved to be more complex and expensive and the choices have expanded to reflect that. Which is why I think Apple was wise to offer the iPhone SE2. They’ve addressed a market that was there from the beginning and likely will be there for years to come, given that not everyone wants or needs a $1000 pocket computer and want what the iPhone originally was envisioned as.
 
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