Anyone here a dual citizen?

Discussion in 'Community Discussion' started by iMacZealot, Mar 19, 2008.

  1. iMacZealot macrumors 68020

    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2005
    #1
    How does that work? Do you have two passports? Do you count for two in global population counts?

    I'm a naturalised US citizen, but since my mother's grandparents came from Ireland, for some reason, she can become a dual citizen, which I guess means that I could become a dual citizen as well, but my mom hasn't done that.

    I'm still in high school, but I'm expecting to move somewhere overseas either after high school or college. That is, if I decide to go to college.
     
  2. EricNau Moderator emeritus

    EricNau

    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2005
    Location:
    San Francisco, CA
    #2
    You can read the State Depatment's webpage on dual citizenship: Link

    You'll need a US passport to leave and enter this country, and depending on the laws of the foreign state, you may need to use their passport as well.

    Typically, a census is taken based on population, not citizenship, so you would only be counted in the state in which you reside.

    I'm not sure about this (as it varies from country to country), but if you wish to declare dual citizenship with another country, it may be easier to apply for citizenship before you turn 18. Also, each country has it's own naturalization laws, so you may or may not be eligible for dual citizenship in Ireland.
     
  3. juanster macrumors 68020

    juanster

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    toronto
    #3
    i think it depends on the countries you have or want citizenships from, i have a dual citizenship, I have a Colombian passport and a Canadian passport.
     
  4. aethelbert macrumors 601

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2007
    Location:
    Chicago, IL, USA
    #4
    I'm a citizen of the United States and Germany, I have two passports. But when traveling to/from the US, I am required by law to use my US passport. If I only had a German one, I could use that, but since I have a US one and a German one, I must travel with the American one.
     
  5. brad.c macrumors 68020

    brad.c

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    #5
    Oh, I thought you meant a secret identity. My lycra super-tights keep me warm in the winter, and look styling when I'm fighting crime.

    Of course I have to stay in Canada, since my passport expired.

    EDIT: BTW: My wife's mother is Scottish, thus she was able to claim dual Canada-UK citizenship until she turned 25 (she let it lapse). But Canada is still part of the commonwealth, so the ties are stronger (and I imagine obstacles shorter) than for born and bred US citizens.
     
  6. EricNau Moderator emeritus

    EricNau

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    #6
    May I ask which citizenship you acquired first? As far as I'm aware, it is not possible under German nationality law to apply for German citizenship without denouncing all allegiances to other countries first (except in rare circumstances).
     
  7. iBlue macrumors Core

    iBlue

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2005
    Location:
    London, England
    #7
    Not yet but in the next year or so I will have dual citizenship in the US and the UK. (I'm an american, married to a brit) The main reason I'll bother getting myself a British passport is because it makes travel throughout Europe a bit easier*... that and it's kinda cool, for novelty's sake. :p Plus, at the moment I have no proper ID with my married name so the passport will accomplish that.

    *ease through customs - going to the US, use the US passport; going through europe, use the UK passport.
     
  8. scotthayes macrumors 68000

    scotthayes

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    Jun 6, 2007
    Location:
    Birmingham, England
    #8
    Got a friend who had dual citizenship, British and American.

    Originally from England now living in US. So when she leaves the US she shows her American passport, arriving in the UK she shows her British passport and flips it around when leaving the UK. Seems to work for her with no problems.

    But she only appears on one census and can only vote in the country she lives in.
     
  9. Zwhaler macrumors 603

    Zwhaler

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    Jun 10, 2006
    #9
    In about a month or so Im going to have American and Finnish citizenship. Go me
     
  10. Ugg macrumors 68000

    Ugg

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    Penryn
    #10
    How did you manage that? Were your parents born there?
     
  11. juanm macrumors 65816

    juanm

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    Fury 161
    #11
    I have both French and Spanish citizenships. I have two passports, two ID cards, and one cat. I use one or the other depending on which passport I find first. Also, I want to go to Australia, and since Spain doesn't have yet a visa agreement with Australia, I'm getting my working holiday visa thanks to my French citizenship.

    (My father is Spanish and my mother is French, if you really want to know everything about how they met, just ask by PM :p)
     
  12. Zwhaler macrumors 603

    Zwhaler

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2006
    #12
    I'm not sure yet of the details, but my moms father is from there, and appearantly because of that and some other stuff we were told it is possible for me to get citizenship.
     
  13. klymr macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    May 16, 2007
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    Utah
    #13
    This kid I know is a US citizen, and a Canadian citizen. The US doesn't consider him a citizen of Canada because he was born to a US mother here in USA, but his father was Canadian so Canada considers him a citizen of their country, as well as a citizen of the US. Interesting little thing he has going on there.
     
  14. needthephone macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2006
    Location:
    sydney
    #14
    Yes I have UK and Australian Citizenship and two passports. Great for travelling between Aus and UK as you can go to the shorter citizens queues at both ends.

    I still feel more English though but Australia and specifically Sydney is a beautiful place to live and I don't think I could live in the UK anymore.
     
  15. Rodimus Prime macrumors G4

    Rodimus Prime

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2006
    #15
    The US from my understanding does not recognized dual citizen ship. If you are a citizen of the US and a Citizen of Germany. The US will not recognize your German Citizenship. This does not stop you from having it but it does prevent any benfits the US from giving someone with a dual citizen ship in German citizen that also a US citizen could not get over here in the US.
     
  16. digitalnicotine macrumors 65816

    digitalnicotine

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    Jan 11, 2008
    Location:
    USA
    #16
    I have a friend who is both Brit and American citizen. Not sure what this entails. :)
     
  17. BCains macrumors regular

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    Feb 2, 2007
    Location:
    Gold Coast, Australia
    #17
    I am both an Australian and British citizen, with two passports.

    Question: I was led to believe if you apply for US citizenship you forfeit your other passport/citizenship??
     
  18. MacDanielG macrumors member

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    Mar 7, 2008
    Location:
    FLA
    #18
     
  19. BCains macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2007
    Location:
    Gold Coast, Australia
    #19
    Ok heres the info:

    To be able to get a EU (British/Northern Island) passport, either
    1. Your mother or father born in the Ireland
    2. Grandparent born in Ireland
    3. If a great-grandparent is your nearest Irish-born relative, you can only obtain citizenship if one of your parents registered.
     
  20. joepunk macrumors 68030

    joepunk

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    a profane existence
    #20
    I'm thinking about becoming a dual citizen of the U.S. and Deutschland.
     
  21. McGiord, Mar 21, 2008
    Last edited: Jan 30, 2011

    McGiord macrumors 601

    McGiord

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2003
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    Dark Castle
    #21
    Sounds like a Good Plan, to study in Europe, depending on the Country you choose and if you qualify you could get a very good University/College education with a minor investment.

    Also if you can't get the citizenship directly, you may apply for a student visa, or resident visa depending on the Country you'll like to go.
    In most of the Countries after you live there for X amounts of years you can obtain the citizenship, every country has their own laws/rules.

    For example my wife's step father was from Spain, and he recognized her as his daughter in Venezuela, she obtained the spanish citizenship, and now our newborn daughter, who was born in the USA can also claim the venezuelan and spanish citizenship.

    I have a friend whose Father is Mexican, and his mother venezuelan, he was born in Venezuela, and he also has the Mexican citizenship. In addition to that he has a daughter from his first marriage, her mother also has dual citizenship venezuelan and spanish, therefore this daughter has venezuelan, spanish and mexican citizenship + US resident status.

    Learn other languages + the whole experience of living in another country is very wise and will make you a better person.

    Good luck!
    ________
    glass pipes
     
  22. MacDanielG macrumors member

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2008
    Location:
    FLA
    #22
    I agree, i have always wanted to do that but at this point... don't think i will ever have a chance. I guess it will be one of those things ill regret i never did when i am 60.
     
  23. KJmoon117 macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2007
    Location:
    NC
    #23
    I could've got a dual US/Korean citizenship but Korea doesn't recognize dual citizenship and I don't think the US does too if you want to be naturalized.

    I could be wrong but currently I have my Korean citizenship and it pretty much sucks =P
     
  24. Ugg macrumors 68000

    Ugg

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2003
    Location:
    Penryn
    #24
    Finland makes it pretty easy to get residency. All you have to do is show proof of Finnish heritage. I would definitely qualify for residency but I believe citizenship is much more difficult. I have 1 great grandparent born in Finland and 8 great-great grandparents who were born in Finland.

    I'd be interested in learning more if you have the info.
     
  25. EricNau Moderator emeritus

    EricNau

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    Apr 27, 2005
    Location:
    San Francisco, CA
    #25
    You're Dutch then? ;) :p
     

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