Anyone tried editing video in Photoshop CS3 or CS4?

Discussion in 'Digital Video' started by wonderspark, Mar 18, 2010.

  1. wonderspark macrumors 68030

    wonderspark

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2010
    Location:
    Oregon
    #1
    I'm editing a film in which fishing wire is attached to a chair. (Yeah, it's a horror film.) I thought I'd try using the clone tool in photoshop (CS3) to remove the wire, then bring it back into Premiere / After Effects CS3 and be done with it.

    It worked, sort of. Oddly, there are still some frames here and there in which the wire is visible, partially, and other frames, fully.

    I'm trying to figure out what I'm missing here. The original video file was shot on P2, DVCPRO HD. The file is MXF, 1280x1080, and I believe it was shot using 1080/24p. I say this because the file info reads as:

    Image Size: 1280 x 1080
    Pixel Depth: 1280
    Frame Rate: 29.97 (24p)
    Source Audio Format: 48000 Hz - 16 bit - Mono
    Total Duration: 00:06:17:20
    Average Data Rate: 10.7 MB / second
    Pixel Aspect Ratio: 1.5

    Hmm, I may have found the problem as I typed this out. My project settings were 1080i instead of 1080p, and I exported the clip I'm working on as 1080i, so I've essentially mixed things up a bit.

    I'll try this again with things set the same across the board.

    I'm still interested to know, however, if anyone has edited video footage in PS like this, and if it blew their minds, or left them wanting.
     
  2. Eric Mathes macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2009
    #2
    clone over wires with PS

    Good question. I never thought one could clone over wires etc. in PhotoShop without doing it one frame at a time & in video it takes 30 frames for every second of video. There sure are programs for doing what you want but I'd be very suprized if PhotoShop is it without doing it one frame at a time. I hope PS can do it I could really use it & can't wait to here people's feedback.
     
  3. wonderspark thread starter macrumors 68030

    wonderspark

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2010
    Location:
    Oregon
    #3
    Yeah, it's one-frame-at-a-time work, but it worked really well, at least in the photoshop preview. It was only a second or two, maybe three... so not that much work, in my opinion. Problem was, I put it back into Premiere and After Effects, and some frames still had wires showing, where they were gone in Photoshop.

    I'm redoing it with a new file exported as 24p to see if the mixed formats jacked it up.

    I've been reading / learning about 24p versus 24pA (advanced pulldown) all day, and my head is reeling.
     
  4. wonderspark thread starter macrumors 68030

    wonderspark

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2010
    Location:
    Oregon
    #4
    Victory!

    Victory is mine.

    I was right. I didn't realize that I'd set up the project as 29.97, while the footage was 23.976, and when I exported a clip to edit in Photoshop, it introduced problems. Now that it's all 24p, I was able to clone out the fishing line perfectly, frame-by-frame, in a matter of an hour or less. (I ate dinner and did a few other things between now and my last post, hahaha.)

    I'm really, really thrilled to have learned this little feature with Photoshop. Having used PS for years, I'm now able to do some amazing tricks with video with huge efficiency.

    As far as cloning out wires goes, it's really cake. It literally takes about 10-30 seconds per frame if you have a steady hand and a good target location to clone from. It's when you have to clone out complex backgrounds that it might take a couple minutes per frame to work it out.
     
  5. FSMBP macrumors 68020

    FSMBP

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2009
    #5
    That's the good thing about Photoshop - it doubles as a decent rotoscoping tool.

    I used it for wire removal as well. The 2.5 second shot took about 15 minutes but it was worth it.
     
  6. paddyhazard macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2010
    Location:
    London
    #6
    Would it not still have been quicker to import a jpg of whatever you are cloning over into aftereffects and overlay that over the wire with a bit of feathering to reduce the obvious straight edge effect?

    I'm more of a graphic and web designer and haven't done much with video but trying to get the hang of aftereffects.

    If not was there a shortcut you used to automatically open each next frame after you did the work and saved the frame or did you just double click each frame?
     
  7. wonderspark thread starter macrumors 68030

    wonderspark

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2010
    Location:
    Oregon
    #7
    That's the beauty of it... You drop the video file into Photoshop, and it opens a timeline and everything for you, as if it were a video editing platform. You find the frame you want to chop, chop it, and click the frame advance button to proceed to the next frame. When you're done, you render the video out of Photoshop, and it maintains the same file format and everything, so no mixing of jpgs, codecs, etc.

    I was amazed, and I was just wondering if anyone else was blown away when this first came out, since I only just discovered it a couple days ago. I mean, CS3 is old as dirt now, but my last edit suite prior to now had CS2, and I don't think this feature was available then. I'm waiting for CS5 before I upgrade again, as I've heard there are miraculous wonders to behold there, and CS3 is pleasing me at the moment.
     

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