Anyone worried Apple is slacking on REAL computers?

Discussion in 'Apple, Inc and Tech Industry' started by andymac2210, Feb 13, 2012.

  1. andymac2210 macrumors regular

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    #1
    With the proliferation of iOS devices today and the fact they account for the majority of Apple's profit, does anyone else worry Apple may stop making proper computers altogether?


    I don't mean next year, I mean in 5 years.
    We'll all be stuck with these silly tablets, that are only good for consuming media.


    Even if Apple doesn't stop making computers, I really feel like they're playing second fiddle to the rockstar iPhones and iPads these days.
    All you need to do is look at Apples treatment of the pro market to see the decline in how much they care about supposedly(well, not anymore really) their main products.

    Apple seem to be going after education in a big way, they need to do the same with the enterprise and professional market.
     
  2. mrsir2009 macrumors 604

    mrsir2009

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    #3
    Well, their long term plans do involve merging iOS and OSX.
     
  3. chrono1081 macrumors 604

    chrono1081

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    #4
    "Real computers" are what is needed to develop for iDevices so no worries, omputers aren't going away anytime soon.

    Not to mention most of the "Apple doesn't care about the pro market" crap you hear is from non-pros, or people who think they're pros because they use Photoshop or something.

    Most "real" pros in any industry are smart enough to not be tied down to one piece of hardware or software that can hose their entire workflow if it stops being supported.
     
  4. boss.king macrumors 68040

    boss.king

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    #5
    Where did you get that from?
     
  5. mobilehaathi macrumors G3

    mobilehaathi

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    #6
    His butt
     
  6. mrsir2009 macrumors 604

    mrsir2009

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    #7
    OSX Lion, the MacBook Air and the Mac App Store.
     
  7. roadbloc macrumors G3

    roadbloc

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    #8
    More or less accepted now that Apple's focus is in consumer novelty gadgets rather than computers.

    In some cases this is a good thing, the iPhone is a beast of a phone and the iPad is great for the average user who knows nothing about computers.

    In others, it is a terrible shame. OS X used to be brilliant, as did some of Apple's computer lineup. Now they're all being dumbed down to the power of iOS.
     
  8. KnightWRX macrumors Pentium

    KnightWRX

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    #9
    Long term ? iOS and OS X were never separated to begin with.

    This "merging" bit has got to stop. It's wrong on so many levels.

    ----------

    The SDK could be released for Linux and developers left to fend for themselves on finding the hardware to run it on.

    ----------

    How is Lion dumbed down ? It still has a full BSD userland, accessible right from Applications -> Utilities -> Terminal. It still ships with many scripting environnements, still supports MacPorts for all that open source goodness, still has an X11 server for remote GUI of X applications, etc.. etc...

    It's still the best darn consumer Unix out there. If that is being dumbed down, then dumb me all the way down please.

    Removing "All Windows" Expose is not dumbing down.
     
  9. Mord macrumors G4

    Mord

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    #10
    Nope.

    I'm patiently waiting for a 15" retina display macbook air.

    I trust that they will make this a reality when it is feasible.
     
  10. KnightWRX macrumors Pentium

    KnightWRX

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    #11
    That has nothing to do with Apple slacking on computers though. Giving the geeks a bit of candy now and again doesn't mean they aren't slacking.

    However, I think what we're seeing is more that the Mac product line is getting mature. In fact, I'm more afraid of Apple giving it attention right now than just letting it be. Seems to me their ideas now mostly revolve around "optional lock-downs" (let's hope they stay optional). They should just leave it alone. Lion is a good all around OS with nice UI tweaks, if you remove the MAS and the crap it brings and forces on developers.
     
  11. SuperCachetes macrumors 6502a

    SuperCachetes

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    #12
    I don't think that in five years tablets will be as limited to consuming content, for one.

    Why? Because dropping xserve and letting the Mac Pros stagnate has really put their sales, profit, and stock price in the toilet?

    Really, I like the idea of having big, brutish, expandable Mac workstations out there - but I have to believe that Apple is a better judge of what markets make sense to pursue than we are.
     
  12. vrDrew macrumors 65816

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    #13
    I think there is very little evidence to suggest Apple is going to stop making computers anytime in the foreseeable future. And there's precious little evidence to suggest that they've eased up on the development of the Mac itself. They continue to develop the OS, they've introduced things like the App Store, and the MacBook Air is probably one of the crown jewels in their product portfolio.

    Because of the incredible growth of the iPhone and iPad platforms a lot of Apple's accomplishments in the Mac line have gotten overshadowed, not only in the tech and popular press, but also in Apple's financial statements. But its also important to recognize that Apple has grown its Mac market faster than the overall PC market for something like 27 quarters now.

    One of the problems the entire personal computer industry has faced is a certain stagnation that set in during the early to mid part of the 2000s. That sometime between the introduction of Windows XP and Windows 7, much of the computer industry simply focused on making cheaper and cheaper boxes.

    Its interesting then, to see how Apple differed: They focused on their industrial design - everything from the gorgeous aluminum case, to the wireless keyboards and Touchpads, to the elegance of their power cables(!).

    Amongst "old-school" Mac people there does seem to be some concern that Apple is "abandoning" the graphics and video professionals who used to make up a core market. I personally think this concern is overblown. The MacPro is still a workhorse - but its also worth considering that, on a dollar-for-dollar basis, it no longer holds the price/performance edge it once did. Apple tried to overcome this shortcoming by introducing a 64-bit version of its "professional" video-editing software - and reaped a whirlwind of criticism in return. Short-term Apple is seen as blowing the Final Cut X/Pro switchover. I think in 3 or four years people will be wondering why anyone is still fooling around with 32-bit editing systems. Apple - unlike Microsoft and a few other companies - seems to have the strength to make the painful decision to abandon legacy technologies once the way forward is apparent.

    Virtually all of Apple's success over the past decade was built on the expertise, culture, and vision of the people who planned, designed, and built the company's computers. And I'd contrast that experience with that of a company like Samsung or HTC. These companies may have researchers working on video screen and telecommunications chips - but that's not what gets people to buy phones or tablets. Its the sort of "human interface" and elegant software and hardware design you get from making computers - and that only Apple presently does - that makes the difference.

    The Mac ain't going anywhere.
     

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