Apartment Shooting

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by alansmallen, Apr 19, 2009.

  1. alansmallen macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2007
    #1
    Hey guys. I'm planning on going to shoot an apartment for a client's website. I'm planning on doing a 9 shot panorama from a corner of the studio apartment.

    Any advice?
     
  2. toxic macrumors 68000

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    Nov 9, 2008
  3. Kronie macrumors 6502a

    Kronie

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    Dec 4, 2008
    #4
    Shoot raw and process as an HDR.

    Use a tripod, meter for the brightest window and expose down so everything is exposed properly. If you just expose for the couch your window will be blown out.

    Sorry, I don't have an example handy.
     
  4. Edge100 macrumors 68000

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    Where am I???
    #5
    This is one of those styles in which HDR can really help. We're not talking cartoonish here, but rather tone mapping that helps to get good window exposures in combination with appropriate exposure of the rest of the scene.

    I would advise (as Kronie said) metering for the window to make sure the outdoor scene is not blown out, and then adding exposure compensation above that to capture the rest of the scene, which will be much darker than the outdoor light (obviously).

    Get at least 3 exposures per shot (0, +2, +4 EV, with 0 EV being the correct metering for the window light), create panoramas from the RAWs first, and then tone map the pano (if you tone map the RAWs first and then do the pano, you'll get some strange results because the tone mapping wont be consistent across the scene).
     
  5. alansmallen thread starter macrumors 6502a

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    Jun 25, 2007
    #6
    Forgot to mention, but I'm kind of new to photography. Only been really shooting for two years.
     
  6. gkarris macrumors 604

    gkarris

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  7. Edge100 macrumors 68000

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    Where am I???
    #8
    The problem with this type of photography is that you're dealing with two vastly different scenes with vastly different lighting: the indoor scene with indoor light, and the outdoor scene with sunlight. The difference between a sunny day and a typical indoor light can exceed 10 stops or more; that is, depending on the time of day and degree of sunlight, the outdoor light can be 2^10 (1024) times brighter than the indoor light. This exceeds the dynamic range of all current DSLRs.

    Thus, if you expose for the room, the outdoor scene will be completely overexposed, while if you expose for the outdoor scene, the room will be completely in shadows. One way to get around this is to make multiple exposures of the scene, and then merge them later. You could, I suppose, add your own light to the room (i.e. multiple strobes), but HDR is much easier in this case.

    Frankly, I've seen indoor photos that have the window light blown out, and they're still just fine, so bracketing might not be absolutely necessary. But I find that the use of exposure bracketing and HDR can really add to the final product.

    If you're not into this type of fancy PP, then I would suggest just getting the best possible exposure for the room, and let the outdoor scene overexpose. As for the panorama, make sure you use Av (aperture priority) mode on your camera, so that the depth of field does not change as you pan and reset your exposure.
     
  8. alansmallen thread starter macrumors 6502a

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    Jun 25, 2007
    #9
    The apartment is in the middle of Times Square here in NYC so I really want to show the window. I'm gonna give it a go at my place tonight as a test.
     
  9. Mousse macrumors 68000

    Mousse

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    Apr 7, 2008
    Location:
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    #10
    Use your widest lense that isn't a fisheye. Wide angle shots will make the rooms appear larger than it is.
     
  10. alansmallen thread starter macrumors 6502a

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    Jun 25, 2007
    #11
    Kind of limited by that. My widest lens is a 17mm.
    I'll probably go with the panorama and HDR.
     
  11. cr2sh macrumors 68030

    cr2sh

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    May 28, 2002
    Location:
    downtown
    #12
    Yeh.. but you don't want to go too wide. An ultrawide lens is going to give a false impression of space.. that's almost false advertising. You gotta find a good middle ground.
     
  12. Kronie macrumors 6502a

    Kronie

    Joined:
    Dec 4, 2008
    #13
    If your going to stitch, then you may NOT want to shoot at 17mm or you will get distortions from your lens. I don't know what lens you have but most zooms have barrel distortions at 17mm, so window frames and doorways may look a bit off.

    I have a 17-55 now that has practically no distortion at 17mm, but I used to own a 17-85, that was worthless at 17mm (for architecture) everything was bowed in.
     

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