Resolved Aperture 3: in import window show only what hasn't been imported

Discussion in 'Mac Apps and Mac App Store' started by mlsusa, May 18, 2013.

  1. mlsusa, May 18, 2013
    Last edited: May 20, 2013

    mlsusa macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2012
    #1
    I don't like to delete the photos in my memory cards after importing them. So the next time I import, I see photos I already imported along with the new ones and there's no way to tell which ones have already been imported. I have to somehow figure out where I left off to select only the photos that haven't been imported yet.

    iPhoto seems to be able to figure it out but I'd rather use just Aperture instead of using iPhoto to import and Aperture for everything else (e.g. touchups, photo management, etc).

    For those that also don't delete originals from the memory card how do you work with Aperture's import workflow? Do you also just manually keep track or do you use some kind of automation or AppleScript?

    Thanks in advance.
     
  2. flynz4 macrumors 68040

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2009
    Location:
    Portland, OR
    #2
    Click the "do not import duplicates" checkbox.

    It is also useful if you have a camera with dual SD cards. I keep my camera set to "mirror"... writing to both SD cards. That way, if there is an SD card failure during a shoot... I am covered. I always first import card A... and when that is finished, I insert card B. If any pictures show up... then I know that I had an SD card error.

    /Jim
     
  3. mlsusa thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2012
    #3
    That was it. Thanks!

    Wow, can't believe the setting was staring me in the face. I pretty much hunted through many of the import settings but this one was right there front and center. Oh well.

    I do wonder why it's not on by default and I figured it was just something the pros would understand. But I'd expect all pros on a job to have the two SD cards for redundancy in case of failure in one so I'd think having this setting turned on would've been a good default for professional photographers as well.

    Not that it matters now.

    Thanks again!
     
  4. snberk103 macrumors 603

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    Oct 22, 2007
    Location:
    An Island in the Salish Sea
    #4
    So, lets move on the next step in your 'photo education' :)

    How are you backing up your photos? Keeping the photos on the memory card indefinitely is not a complete backup strategy (though, I believe it can be part of a good backup strategy).

    When I import my photos, I also don't delete from card immediately. I do put the card that I just imported from aside. For the moment that card is the backup.

    Every night all of my photos get backed up (cloned) to an external HDD. The memory card (above) does not get put back into rotation into I've confirmed that the backup happened. Only at this point does the card get put back into rotation.

    When I put a card into the camera, I immediately format it. I don't need the photos, and they're just taking up room. The general consensus is that it is better to format in the camera in any case.

    On a regular basis (in theory at least) I rotate the external HDD into a safety deposit box so that I have an off-site backup. The HDD I bring back is the 3rd of 3 externals, and will be connected to system only when I do the HDD swappy thingy. So, most recent backup is connected and written to nightly. The next most recent is in the bank, and the oldest recent is sitting on a shelf waiting until I move the connected HDD to the safety deposit box.

    Hope that helps... and is clear.

    Also, Aperture has a Vault. Use it if you aren't already.
     
  5. mlsusa thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2012
    #5
    Appreciate the tips.

    Currently I'm backing up using two methods. One is Time Machine on an external HD. The other is a script that keeps updated a copy of the Aperture library sitting on a NAS with a 2tb RAID 1 array.

    For offsite backups I used to burn them to DVDs I leave at the office but it's been a while so at this point I have quite the backlog. I've been researching cloud backups but the roadblock right now isn't cost or security concerns but the time it'll take to seed the backup. Based on the various write-ups, unless they offer the ability to seed via HD sent back and forth using fedex/ups/etc, which only a handful do and for a fee, getting my 100s of GBs up to any of these services will take ages.

    I've also seen various articles talk about rotating HDs in and out as a critical part of any backup strategy. At this moment I have a spare 500gb drive so I can likely get another one and I can rotate the 2 back and forth between home and office. Beats the PITA that is saving in batches the newest sets of photos and videos to DVDs.

    I have been curious about Aperture's Vault since even before I purchased it but haven't had a chance to find out how to use it. I'll look into it to see how it can help.

    Thanks.
     
  6. snberk103 macrumors 603

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    Oct 22, 2007
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    An Island in the Salish Sea
    #6
    Sounds like you have this covered. :) Too often the answer is "What backup?"...

    Personally, I like having multiple external HDDs. I can use cheap USB2 drives because my auto backups happen overnight. I use SuperDuper! that only updates what has changed. If one goes bad I can replace it at our local Source (Radio Shack) as I live in small community. When I see large external HDDs on a good sale I sometimes pick those up as well. I figure the annual fee for cloud storage ends up being more than the cost of the HDDs.
     
  7. flynz4 macrumors 68040

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2009
    Location:
    Portland, OR
    #7
    To misusa:

    My backup is simlar to snberk's... except that I add in cloud based backup. In my priority order:

    1) Time Machine local backup
    2) Crashplan+ cloud backup
    3) Rotated HDDs (unlike snberk... I only use 2). One is always offsite.

    One other thing that I would comment on is your using optical DVDs. They are really horrible. The shelf life can be quite short. There was a recent post here about someone who needed his DVD backup and the bit rot had already set in. Ditch that DVD idea... and keep your backup fresh and alive.

    /Jim
     
  8. mlsusa, May 20, 2013
    Last edited: May 20, 2013

    mlsusa thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2012
    #8
    I think I've given up on using DVDs, not because they're horrible or unreliable (thankfully, knocking on wood, I've never actually had to resort to recovering from them) but because it's such a huge PITA. You have to copy to them manually in batches which is tedious and time-consuming even with software for that specific purpose. I was doing it half-heartedly for a while but then I got way behind.

    Rotating HDs sounds like a great idea and I think it's time I get serious about it instead of saying I'll get to it eventually. I'll probably only use 2 myself. One for home and one kept in the office. I'd want to make it low effort so that I don't get get lazy as I'm apt to do, so I'm thinking some kind of USB3 enclosure that I can easily pop the HDs in and out. I have available bays in my NAS and I can pop a drive in no problem but to take it out I have to power the whole thing down. Not the worst thing but it is a bit of a process with the one I have (Thecus N5550).

    As for the backup itself seems obvious to me I should clone my primary drive. Unless there's another strategy I should consider here as well? I'm good with Time Machine just for home in case I want to roll back to an earlier version of a file and I'm not interested in manually copying files to the HD. SuperDuper! is the free one and CCC is the one you have to buy, correct?

    Thanks again for all the tips.
     
  9. Bear macrumors G3

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    Jul 23, 2002
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    Sol III - Terra
    #9
    DVD-R's seem to rot a whole lot faster than CD-Rs. I could see if you're on the road making backups on DVD to cover you until you're home and can get the originals backed up every where.

    Depending on the brand of the recordable DVD they can go bad in as little as a year. Although a decent brand will last at lest 4 or 5 years if kept in a decent environment.
     
  10. snberk103 macrumors 603

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2007
    Location:
    An Island in the Salish Sea
    #10
    You are correct, the best backup strategy is the one that is easy enough you actually do it. If powering down the NAS to swap drives is just that little bit too trouble to do it (and I am serious here - because I understand that sometimes it's the simple little things that we keep putting off) then you need to find something else.

    I'm not saying this is the solution for you... but this is mine.

    I backup my system files and and photos separately, each to a different external HDD, nightly using Smart Update with SuperDuper! (This is a cloned backup). I also use Time Machine to backup my system files.

    The TM copy is for recovering from user errors.... files I didn't mean to write over or delete.

    The cloned copy is for hardware failures. One of the features of a cloned backup is that you can make it bootable (this may even be the default). If the primary HDD fails I can simply boot from the backup. There are still some things missing (caches, and some history files are missing) but nothing serious. Also applications that use a hardware signature to validate themselves will become "unlicensed". But, for 99% of the stuff you need to do - the system is entirely useable. However, it works only as fast at the interface - for this reason my system backup goes to a Firewire 800 external HDD.

    The other cool thing about a bootable backup is that you can boot another computer from it. So if your whole system goes in for service, you can boot a second computer from the backup and keep working. You are limited by the hardware of the secondary computer, of course... but for email and working on documents this works fine. I used my MBP for a week while my MacPro was in the shop. Photoshop was brutal, but I could at least keep my business moving.

    Why I like 3 external HDDs for my photos (with one going off-site) is simply because if I have gone too long between swap cycles, I can still rotate a HDD into place so that I have two relatively current ext HDDs - even if both of them in on-site for longer than they should be. It's still better than only having one current backup.

    I don't bother with TM on my photos because I use Lightroom. It is relatively difficult to delete an original image in Lightroom, and the overhead of writing to the TM is more than I want to deal with.
     
  11. flynz4, May 20, 2013
    Last edited: May 20, 2013

    flynz4 macrumors 68040

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    Location:
    Portland, OR
    #11
    Personally, I only clone my personally authored media. I have enough computers (we have 4 iMacs and 4 MBA's) that I always have access to another machine. So my clones have always contained:
    • My entire pictures directory, including my Aperture & iPhoto libraries
    • All of my home authored movies (ex: Camcorder videos)
    • iMovie and FCPX projects
    • Until recently... I would also include an Aperture vault

    Hence... I can attach my latest clone drive to my wife's iMac and continue un-interrupted if my iMac failed. I do have a 3rd external that backs up the same media as above every night at 4am... but that does not get rotated offsite. I do that just in case my iMac failed and I needed to move my media to a different computer quickly.

    I have stopped putting the A3 vault on the cloned HDDs because it is an extra time consuming step... and since my A3 library is managed... I do not think the vault gives me anything extra over my entire A3 library clone.

    I do not put my documents, DevonThink Database, etc... on the rotated externals. I keep my external in a locked drawer in my corporate office. The security is moderate (at best)... so I do not want to keep information there that could be used to perform identity theft. My pictures/videos are benign.

    I am 100% anal about making sure that at least one copy of the rotated drives is offsite. The one locked in the drawer at work does not come home until the the newly updated drive replaces it.

    All of this is secondary to having TM and Crashplan+ running... so independent of this manual backup... I already have 3 current
    copies (minimum) of all data.

    /Jim
     
  12. rjphoto macrumors 6502a

    rjphoto

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2005
    #12
    How are Blu Ray disc fairing with bit rot?
     
  13. flynz4 macrumors 68040

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    Aug 9, 2009
    Location:
    Portland, OR
    #13
    Personally... I think it is time to move on from optical media. Even if the material has longevity (doubtful)... the concept of physical media is dying and it will not be long (measure in years... certainly less than a decade)... where optical media will feel like an old crank-style victrola.

    HDD media is dirt cheap... and cloud backup is even less expensive. Make multiple digital copies of everything and keep them fresh.

    /Jim
     
  14. snberk103 macrumors 603

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    Oct 22, 2007
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    An Island in the Salish Sea
    #14
    There is theory and there is practice. If there are problems with bit rot, it won't be known until it starts to happen. In which case, it's too late.

    Microfiche was supposed to be an archival medium - way back when. They tested the materials, and it truly was very stable. Libraries started tossing out the back issues of newspapers and periodicals as they transferred the content to microfiche. In theory, it should have worked fine. In practice, many places processed their film slightly differently than the lab standard. This change shouldn't have made any difference... in theory. In practice, a lot of content has been irretrievably lost due to the analog equivalent of bit rot. Nobody knew that the seemingly insignificant change in processing made a real difference, until it was too late.

    One the other key differences is that a minor degradation in microfiche does not make the entire disc a coaster.... to mix my metaphors. :)
     
  15. Bear macrumors G3

    Joined:
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    Sol III - Terra
    #15
    I don't know about Blu-ray recordable discs. For the price of a BD-R drive and media, it's easy enough to buy a couple more external hard drives.
     

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