Aperture Crash

Discussion in 'Mac Apps and Mac App Store' started by mamoose124, May 5, 2014.

  1. mamoose124, May 5, 2014
    Last edited: May 5, 2014

    mamoose124 macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2014
    #1
    After reinstalling OS X Mavericks and reinstalling my latest Time Machine backup everything seemed to work fine on my iMac. I pulled up several apps and tried them out; all seemed well.

    I had some new photos on my Nikon 7000 and decided to install them on the iMac. I plugged my Nikon 7000 via its USB connection and switched on the camera to initiate Aperture. Aperture came up in import mode installing my images. However, for some reason, Aperture didn't recognize that the majority of the images on the cameras memory card were already installed in Aperture. Consequently, it re-imported all 3,000+ images on the camera memory card!

    In the process of reinstalling all these images Aperture completely trashed my previously created Projects. Now I have over 1,626 Projects with screw ball labels like “Y33wfw8QQ10nRpJ%HuAAOg, Thumbnail, and oo2.” Each of these new Projects have an average of two images each randomly stolen from my original Projects! What a mess! And what is going on with Aperture? It would take me months to clean this mess up and restore my original Projects. This represents over three years of work.

    The bottom line is that my entire library of images is a shambles. Now what? What is the best way to recover from this fiasco?

    I'm thinking that throwing Aperture in the trash and using Time Machine to restore the application would be the best bet. Let me know what you think. I need help on this.:confused:
     
  2. MCAsan, May 5, 2014
    Last edited: May 5, 2014

    MCAsan macrumors 601

    MCAsan

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2012
    Location:
    Atlanta
    #2
    Referenced library or managed library that stores everything inside the Aperture library database? Did you try to use the Aperture tools to test and repair the database?

    I would consider deleting Aperture. Reinstall it from the Apps Store via your account. Setup any Aperture Preferences Restore the Aperture library files from your last good Time Machine backup and run the Aperture tools to see if the database is OK.

    You may or may not need to restore the original masters if they are stored outside the library and are only referenced. Personally I only do referenced libraries of original/master files. I don't put them into Aperture. Use the Aperture. Use Finder to look at the folders of referenced masters to see if they are screwed up. If yes, restore from Time Machine.

    A couple of days I imported 56,002 images, mostly raw files, into Aperture. The files where in 10 yearly main folders with subfolders for each day. I told it to do the import and went to watch TV. I came back an hour later and it was done error free. So Aperture can do big imports with no problem.

    Personally when I finish a shoot for the day, I import all the files from all cards from all bodies. Then I remove the cards and reformat them in the camera bodies. That way I minimize the time where there is a single copy of an image on a memory card and minimize the impacts of a bad or missing card. Also I then do not import multiple projects (different days for me) at one time from the same card.

    Good luck with sorting out the library.
     
  3. mamoose124 thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2014
    #3
    Aperture Crash problem solved

    Thanks MCAsan for the prompt response.

    I did not know that Aperture offered “Tools” to test and repair the Aperture database. In fact, after your suggestion, I looked for these tools in Aperture and found nothing! So, where are these tools?

    However, in the process of carefully examining Apertures menus for these “Tools,” I noticed under the FILE menu (FILE/Switch to Library/) that Aperture Libary.aplibrary was an option. Wait a minute? How did I get in some other library? And, why doesn't Aperture clearly indicate what library it is using? Anyway, I clicked on Aperture Library.alibrary and everything returned to normal!

    So, what library was I in? Checking the FILE menu again (FILE/Switch to Library/) revealed iPhoto Library as an option. Obviously, I had been in the iPhoto library. All of the screwed up projects averaging two images with the wacky names are in iPhoto not Aperture. Problem solved.

    Until recently, I had never used iPhoto. However, by accident, I learned that it has a nice email photo share feature which I have been using of late. I do recall, at one point, clicking on “FILE/Open Library in Aperture” which I did. I did not realize that Aperture would keep this library as default until I manually change libraries. Wouldn't it would be nice if Aperture clearly labeled what library it is using without having to burrow down in its menu options.

    Again, thanks MCAsan for the prompt reply and suggestions. If ever Aperture does give me a problem, your suggestions seems a good place to start.
     
  4. MCAsan macrumors 601

    MCAsan

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2012
    Location:
    Atlanta
    #4
    Info that may be of help now or in the future.


    http://macs.about.com/od/usingyourmac/qt/aperture-3-library-first-aid.htm

    Aperture 3 provides a Library First Aid utility for troubleshooting and repairing common issues with image libraries and Aperture's database. Because library and database corruption can prevent Aperture 3 from launching, you will need to invoke a sequence of startup keys to access the Aperture 3 Library First Aid utility

    Of course, we should all be using a backup process to ensure our image library and database are protected and can be recovered at any time. After all, your image library probably represents years of accumulated pictures that would be difficult to replace if they ever became corrupt. Apple's Time Machine is a great choice for backups, but any of the leading backup applications will work equally well.

    Before you try restoring from a backup to fix issues with Aperture 3, give Aperture's Library First Aid tool a chance to repair any inconsistencies.

    Using Aperture Library First Aid Utilities

    Aperture 3 includes a new tool called Aperture Library First Aid that can correct the most common library and database issues Aperture 3 users are likely to encounter. To access the tool, do the following:

    Quit Aperture 3 if it is currently open.

    Press and hold the option and command keys while you launch Aperture 3.
    The Aperture Library First Aid utility will launch, and provide three different repair processes you can perform.

    Repair Permissions: Examines your library for permissions problems and repairs them. This requires Administrator access.

    Repair Database: Checks for inconsistencies in your library and repairs them.

    Rebuild Database: Examines and rebuilds your database. This option should be used only when repairs to the database or permissions do not address library problems.

    You should consider using both Repair Permissions and Repair Database whenever you need to run the Aperture Library First Aid utility. The third option, Rebuild Database, should only be used as a last resort. You should have a current backup of your Aperture 3 library and database before you use the Rebuild Database option.

    Repairing Aperture 3 Permissions and Repairing the Aperture 3 Database

    Quit Aperture 3 if it is currently open.

    Press and hold the option and command keys while you launch Aperture 3.

    Select Repair Permissions.

    Click the 'Repair' button.

    Provide your Administrator credentials, if needed.
    Aperture Library First Aid will run the Repair Permissions command, and then launch Aperture 3.

    Repairing the Aperture 3 Database

    Quit Aperture 3 if it is currently open.

    Press and hold the option and command keys while you launch Aperture 3.

    Select Repair Database.

    Click the 'Repair' button.
    Aperture Library First Aid will run the Repair Database command, and then launch Aperture 3. If Aperture 3 and your libraries seem to be working correctly, you're done, and can continue using Aperture 3.

    Rebuild Aperture Database

    If you're still having a problem with Aperture 3, you may want to run the Rebuild Database option. Before you do, make sure you have a current backup, in the form of a Time Machine or third-party application backup. At a bare minimum, you should have a current Vault, Aperture's built-in backup of image masters. Remember: Vaults do not include Reference Masters you may have stored outside of Aperture's library system.

    Quit Aperture 3 if it is currently open.

    Press and hold the option and command keys while you launch Aperture 3.

    Select Rebuild Database.

    Click the 'Repair' button.
    Aperture Library First Aid will run the Rebuild Database command. This can take a little while, depending on the size of the library and its database. When finished, Aperture 3 will launch. If Aperture 3 and your libraries seem to be working correctly, you're done, and can continue using Aperture 3.
     

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