App to control fan as f(temp)

Discussion in 'MacBook Air' started by ronswanson, Sep 30, 2012.

  1. ronswanson macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2012
    #1
    Is there any app to set the rpm of a 2012 MBA fan as a function of the temperature?

    I find the built-in settings not aggressive enough for my 13" i7 .. the laptop is cool to the touch but I dont want to keep hitting 100 C when running scientific computing programs with the fan running only at 4000.

    Would rather hear a whirr than be throttled.
     
  2. needfx macrumors 68040

    needfx

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2010
    Location:
    macrumors apparently
    #2
    i just googled this. never tried it

    http://www.eidac.de/?p=243

    and this small conversation

    https://discussions.apple.com/thread/4242808?start=0&tstart=0
     
  3. mrsir2009 macrumors 604

    mrsir2009

    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2009
    Location:
    Melbourne, Australia
    #3
    Yep, there's an application exactly for that called SMC Fan Control. And if you want more information about how to cool your Mac down check out this page. Good luck! :)
     
  4. Zedsdead185 macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2006
    Location:
    UK
    #4
    I second the SMCfancontrol. I've used it on every install on all of my macbooks I've owned. Even on some of desktop macs. Proven invaluable several times :)
     
  5. ronswanson thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2012
    #5
    thanks but smc is not good

    thanks for the replies!

    I have been using SMC Fan Control for years as well but it is incapable of doing what I asked for. All SMC does is change the minimum RPM of the fan with complete disregard for what temperature or load the CPU is at. I got tired of directing SMC to speed up the fans everytime I do something intensive and that's why I asked for an automated program that will increase the minimum RPM as the temperature rises.

    Obviously Apple does this for you but it is not close to being aggressive enough.
     
  6. mrsir2009 macrumors 604

    mrsir2009

    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2009
    Location:
    Melbourne, Australia
    #6
    Is there any specific reason why you don't want the computer heating up? Do you use it on your lap when you preform intensive tasks?
     
  7. ronswanson thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2012
    #7
    Huh? No, I don't use it on my lap but huh? I don't want my CPU running hot just because..

    well, ok, being serious, the CPU is throttled once it gets close to 100 C - i.e my expensive i7 computer will run slower than a computer half its cost, completely defeating the point of having a fast computer to run my scientific tasks.
     
  8. mrsir2009 macrumors 604

    mrsir2009

    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2009
    Location:
    Melbourne, Australia
    #8
    Have you thought about getting a cooling pad?
     
  9. asting macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2012
    #9
    I assure you if it's being throttled then the fan should be at full speed. It won't run the fan at half speed and throttle... If it is doing that it sounds like you have a defective machine.
     
  10. ronswanson thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2012
    #10
    Ok, this is getting really weird.. a cooling pad for an ultraportable 3 lb laptop?

    As for throttling, yes, the fans do run at full speed when I get to 100 C - but not before. That is the problem. There are other detailed reviews of the i7 vs i5 online who found the same thing, so it's not just my machine. Apple seems to have come down heavily on the side of keeping your machine quiet. Hence they wait until it is almost too late to really crank up the fan. With manual control using SMC Fan Control, I found I was able to do much better and keep the max CPU temperature for a given intensive calculation 10 - 15 C less than Apple would achieve.

    My OP was just asking for a program that could do this for me without manual intervention.. anyway, I think UltraFan, made by someone on this forum, might be the answer I was looking for.
     

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