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An Apple-1 advertisement that was written by Steve Jobs recently sold for $175,759 at an auction hosted by RR Auction. The ad is a rough draft with specifications for the Apple-1 machine, along with information on the details that Jobs wanted to include.

steve-jobs-ad-apple-1.jpg

"Board only + manual, $75. A real deal" reads a part of the advertisement that Jobs wrote out. Jobs' signature is included, and the address listed is his parents' house, which is where Apple started out.

The handwritten draft matches the original advertisement for the Apple-1, with the first ad published in the July 1976 edition of Interface Magazine. The ad is accompanied by two Polaroid photos of Apple-1 machines taken at The Byte Shop in Mountain View, California. Jobs annotated one of the images, noting that it was "fuzzy because camera wiggled."

The ad copy was put up for sale by a close friend of Steve Jobs that was present during the Apple-1's developmental phase. He was gifted the items as cherished keepsakes.

apple-1-computer-domain.jpg

Separately, an operational Apple-1 Computer signed by Steve Wozniak sold for $223,520, and a 1976 Apple Computer check signed by Jobs and Wozniak sold for $135,261.

Article Link: Apple-1 Ad Handwritten by Steve Jobs Sells for Over $175,000
 

ChrisA

macrumors G5
Jan 5, 2006
12,524
1,606
Redondo Beach, California
People with too much money out doing other people with too much money.

Enjoy that $175,759 piece of paper!
This paper is likely a better long-term investment than Bitcoin. It is very rare. Jobs is never going to write another first advertisement.

But will it hold value? 100 years from now, no one will be alive who remembers Steve Jobs. Jobs will be a historic figure, not a memory. Does this make the paper more or less valuable? The paper is an investment, but not one without risk. It might go up by a factor of ten or could lose most of its value.

How much would you pay today for a memo written and signed by Herman Hollerith? Herman Hollerith was arguably even more important in the history of founding computer companies than was Steve Jobs. Herman Hollerith invented the very idea of modern computing, Job only took an existing idea and run with it.

In 200 years, Jobs and Hollerith might be seen as peers and known only to historians.

BTW, Herman Hollerith, invented the punched card and data processing in the 1880s and founded a company called "IBM". He got his "big break" by winning a contact from the US Government to process US Census data and recalculate congressional districts, among other things. I think this was the 1890 census, Then 90 years later in 1981 his company released the "IBM PC" and invented personal computing. Today's tower PCs still look like the old 1980s PC turned to stand on one side.
 

CD Player

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Aug 1, 2023
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This paper is likely a better long-term investment than Bitcoin. It is very rare. Jobs is never going to write another first advertisement.

But will it hold value? 100 years from now no one will be alive who remembers Steve Jobs. Jobs will be a historic figure, not a memory. Does this make the paper more or less valuable? The paper is an investment but not one without risk. It might go up by a factor of ten or could loose most of its value.
Ok Ok relax it was a social commentary and joke. No need to write a dissertation. I am well aware. :)
 

HobeSoundDarryl

macrumors G4
This paper is likely a better long-term investment than Bitcoin. It is very rare. Jobs is never going to write another first advertisement.

But will it hold value? 100 years from now, no one will be alive who remembers Steve Jobs. Jobs will be a historic figure, not a memory. Does this make the paper more or less valuable? The paper is an investment, but not one without risk. It might go up by a factor of ten or could lose most of its value.

How much would you pay today for a memo written and signed by Herman Hollerith? Herman Hollerith was arguably even more important in the history of founding computer companies than was Steve Jobs. Herman Hollerith invented the very idea of modern computing, Job only took an existing idea and run with it.

In 200 years, Jobs and Hollerith might be seen as peers and known only to historians.

BTW, Herman Hollerith, invented the punched card and data processing in the 1880s and founded a company called "IBM". He got his "big break" by winning a contact from the US Government to process US Census data and recalculate congressional districts, among other things. I think this was the 1890 census, Then 90 years later in 1981 his company released the "IBM PC" and invented personal computing. Today's tower PCs still look like the old 1980s PC turned to stand on one side.

Your post about how quickly "we" forget brought to mind this classic which cracks me up every time I watch it...

 

JosephAW

macrumors 603
May 14, 2012
5,843
7,680
Remember using an Atari 600/800 xl with the 6502 with basic and assembly language and a 5.35" floppy.
Bought an amber display from radio shack and hot wired it into the video display chip instead of the tv RF output connector resulting in better quality.

Interestingly enough the 68000 chip was later adopted as the main CPU yet they continued to use the 6502 for a long while as the floppy controller on the Macintosh computers. :rolleyes:
 
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Shirasaki

macrumors P6
May 16, 2015
15,409
10,592
Some silly people think they will access his intelligence by having some of his handwriting.
Like teens chasing for autographs by famous people.
I can’t blame teens, I got some interesting autographs at that age too 😂
But fully grownups 😳
Plot twist: paper is won by a teenager who somehow got a lot of money through parents or they won something. And that teenager cherish Steve Jobs handwriting.
 
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Lioness~

macrumors 68030
Apr 26, 2017
2,821
3,444
Mars
I wonder who owns the house and garage where Steve Jobs built the Apple 1? You would think that would go for a $$$ at auction.
Google says below if you Ask that question/ as of 2013 though.

Patricia Jobs

The home is currently owned by Patricia Jobs, Steve Jobs' sister. Jobs' stepmother, Marilyn Jobs, still lives in the house. Tourists stop by on a weekly basis to take pictures, and the goal of the historical designation is to preserve the home as it looked in the 1970s.28 okt. 2013
 
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