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Apr 12, 2001
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Jobs site Glassdoor yesterday announced the release of its annual list of the 50 best places to work. While consulting companies Bain and McKinsey topped the list, Apple grabbed 10th place in the survey with an average employee rating of 3.9 out of 5. Apple's performance marked a significant increase over the previous three years that saw the company ranking around 20th place in the survey.

Facebook, last year's #1 company, took third in this year's survey while Google jumped from #30 to #5 to place ahead of Apple among high-profile tech companies.

glassdoor_apple_2012.jpg



In tech company employee ratings of their CEOs, Apple's Tim Cook placed third with an approval rating of 96%, one point lower than Steve Jobs' approval rating in last year's survey. This year's CEO survey was led by National Instruments' James Truchard and NetApp's Tom Georgens, who both scored 100% approval ratings.

Article Link: Apple and Tim Cook Fare Well in Survey of Best Places to Work
 

dethmaShine

macrumors 68000
Apr 13, 2010
1,697
0
Into the lungs of Hell
Google is undeniably one of the best places to work in.

Having worked with Google for a couple of years in AI cars (for simpletons), I can easily say that Google really wants you to live in the office 24 hours. That is the philosophy of the entire silicon valley but Google has set its own bar, really high. I don't necessarily say its the right way to do(PS3/Xbox/Sofa/beds, etc) but nonetheless they've made their own impression on graduates esp.

On another, Apple is highly disciplined but I was really satisfied with my one day visit at the Cupertino campus. The building is quite old but its pure excellence. Apple is also very relaxed for any one who doesn't know but they sure don't cater Xbox/PS3 nerds and don't have beds for people to stay over. I am planning to apply to Apple soon. Really psyched to see the new campus plan in 2015. It's a dream come true for many.

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So Tim Cook is a "place to work"?

CEO Rating
 

QCassidy352

macrumors G4
Mar 20, 2003
11,835
5,561
Bay Area
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Wait, BAIN is the best place to work? Is this blizzaro world? Bain drives people to the brink of madness. Something is terribly wrong with this survey.
 

twitter

macrumors member
Oct 27, 2007
67
0
how about using a comma?

Apple and Tim Cook, Fare Well in Survey of Best Places to Work
 

Winni

macrumors 68040
Oct 15, 2008
3,207
1,196
Germany.
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Wait, BAIN is the best place to work? Is this blizzaro world? Bain drives people to the brink of madness. Something is terribly wrong with this survey.

I had an interview once with a company that was ranked #23 of the best places to work in Germany. Well, if that was #23, then every other place where I've ever worked was at least on rank #22.

To make it simple, those rankings are bollocks.
 

lowlymarine

macrumors newbie
Dec 15, 2010
13
1
Orlando, FL
Is that rating for Apple Corporate, retail, or both?

While this is doubtlessly just referring to people who work at corporate, I think you'd be very hard pressed to find a better job in retail than at an Apple Retail Store. Ditto for tech support and working at AppleCare. Every arm of Apple treats their employees exceptionally well.
 

Corrald

macrumors newbie
Jun 7, 2010
10
0
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X
 

iRCL

macrumors 6502
Nov 2, 2011
284
0
Google is undeniably one of the best places to work in.

Having worked with Google for a couple of years in AI cars (for simpletons), I can easily say that Google really wants you to live in the office 24 hours. That is the philosophy of the entire silicon valley but Google has set its own bar, really high. I don't necessarily say its the right way to do(PS3/Xbox/Sofa/beds, etc) but nonetheless they've made their own impression on graduates esp.

On another, Apple is highly disciplined but I was really satisfied with my one day visit at the Cupertino campus. The building is quite old but its pure excellence. Apple is also very relaxed for any one who doesn't know but they sure don't cater Xbox/PS3 nerds and don't have beds for people to stay over. I am planning to apply to Apple soon. Really psyched to see the new campus plan in 2015. It's a dream come true for many.

That's very interesting. I don't understand the 24 hours thing, that's just ridiculous, who would want a job like that? Where I work, they are huge on personal time and making sure people are able to be home with their families as much as possible, since that's a really big deal to everyone. When I hear about huge long days every day and people just living at work, it's such a ridiculous turn off and I don't see how anyone can have a normal life and participate in that sort of thing. That works for a small percentage of very smart awesome people, but it also excludes a huge amount of more normal and tbh more professional people. I'm not sleeping at work until I'm being paid more than $500k/year salary, sorry

I'm looking for a job long-term after completing my PhD and I think Apple and Intel are the only ones that seem truly interesting i.e. worth relocating for. Apple seems so opaque that I don't know if I could really know what I'm getting in to before I relocate there and dive in.. so this article was very interesting

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I'm guessing no one asked Apple Retail.

I'm assuming they wouldn't...
 

wilsonlaidlaw

macrumors 6502
Oct 29, 2008
436
64
Tim Cook scores highly - worrying!

For the future of Apple, it is worrying that Tim Cook has scored as highly. I imagine that Jobs was a bit of a nightmare to work for in comparison but the company has done not too badly. Will the company lose its drive and ambition with a "nice guy" at the helm?
 

Spectrum Abuser

macrumors 65816
Aug 27, 2011
1,377
48
For the future of Apple, it is worrying that Tim Cook has scored as highly. I imagine that Jobs was a bit of a nightmare to work for in comparison but the company has done not too badly. Will the company lose its drive and ambition with a "nice guy" at the helm?

Tim was appointed to take the wheel by 'Jobs himself.. So I'm pretty sure Apple is in good hands.
 

Perrumpo

macrumors 68000
Jul 12, 2008
1,724
11
I first read the headline as "Apple and Time Cook Farewell..." and slightly panicked.

how about using a comma?

Apple and Tim Cook, Fare Well in Survey of Best Places to Work

A comma doesn't make sense there, but they definitely should rethink the headline!

For the future of Apple, it is worrying that Tim Cook has scored as highly. I imagine that Jobs was a bit of a nightmare to work for in comparison but the company has done not too badly. Will the company lose its drive and ambition with a "nice guy" at the helm?

In Jobs's biography, it said something along the lines of that Steve hired Tim right away because he immediately realized they had the same vision, so I wouldn't worry.
 
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Corrald

macrumors newbie
Jun 7, 2010
10
0
Wirelessly posted (Mozilla/5.0 (iPhone; CPU iPhone OS 5_0_1 like Mac OS X) AppleWebKit/534.46 (KHTML, like Gecko) Version/5.1 Mobile/9A405 Safari/7534.48.3)

X
 

Hustler1337

macrumors 68000
Dec 23, 2010
1,832
1,577
London, UK
LOL, I thought the article header said that Tim Cook says "Farewell" to Apple. Was getting slightly worried for a brief moment.
 

OllyW

Moderator
Staff member
Oct 11, 2005
17,115
6,508
The Black Country, England
For the future of Apple, it is worrying that Tim Cook has scored as highly. I imagine that Jobs was a bit of a nightmare to work for in comparison but the company has done not too badly. Will the company lose its drive and ambition with a "nice guy" at the helm?

Their approval of Tim Cook was almost the same as Steve Jobs. :)

In tech company employee ratings of their CEOs, Apple's Tim Cook placed third with an approval rating of 96%, one point lower than Steve Jobs' approval rating in last year's survey. This year's CEO survey was led by National Instruments' James Truchard and NetApp's Tom Georgens, who both scored 100% approval ratings.
 

calpundit

macrumors newbie
Feb 25, 2005
7
0
Is that rating for Apple Corporate, retail, or both?

Actually, if you look at the ratings in the post -- upon which the ranking is based -- you will find a lot of comments from Apple retail employees from throughout the country. Contrast that with the other two tech companies in the top 10 -- Google and Facebook -- where the comments are almost exclusively from the "home office."

Also, Apple's ranking is based on 210 separate ratings -- twice as many as Google (98) and nearly 8 times as many as Facebook (28) -- again reflecting its large retail presence.
 

rdowns

macrumors Penryn
Jul 11, 2003
27,397
12,514
I had an interview once with a company that was ranked #23 of the best places to work in Germany. Well, if that was #23, then every other place where I've ever worked was at least on rank #22.

To make it simple, those rankings are bollocks.


And if Apple and Cook hadn't fared as well, you'd be here telling us how ****** it is to work at Apple. Please spare us your broken record.
 

Akarin

macrumors 6502
Oct 16, 2011
290
17
Nyon, Switzerland
I have no idea about how it is to work at Apple (although I know what it is at MS) but it sure is more glamorous than working for a grains trading company :(
 

danhoo

macrumors newbie
Jul 17, 2011
22
0
That's very interesting. I don't understand the 24 hours thing, that's just ridiculous, who would want a job like that? Where I work, they are huge on personal time and making sure people are able to be home with their families as much as possible, since that's a really big deal to everyone. When I hear about huge long days every day and people just living at work, it's such a ridiculous turn off and I don't see how anyone can have a normal life and participate in that sort of thing. That works for a small percentage of very smart awesome people, but it also excludes a huge amount of more normal and tbh more professional people. I'm not sleeping at work until I'm being paid more than $500k/year salary, sorry
.

For many people straight out of school, this sort of environment can be very appealing. They get to work on stuff they like to do anyway, the free perks are better than anything they could get themselves (food, game room, etc), and the majority of their friends and relationships happen through their work environment. Since they don't really have much of a "normal" life yet (no family, etc), work _is_ their life. It's a bit like still being in college, but getting paid.

Eventually, most of these kids hit 30 and start a family, develop priorities outside work, and so on, and realize they need to move on. But there's always a fresh crop of smart 21 year olds ready to take their place.
 
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