Apple Applies for '.apple' Domain Name Suffix

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Original poster
Apr 12, 2001
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As noted by the Associated Press, the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) has published a list of nearly 2,000 applications it has received as part of an expansion of the domain naming system that is planned to add new suffixes, including some based on brands to allow companies to simplify URLs for their sites and enhance their branding.




Apple is included in the list, having paid the $185,000 application fee to request the ".apple" suffix, although it is unclear whether Apple plans to make high-profile use of the new suffix or if its application is primarily for defensive purposes to prevent another company from taking it.
If approved, the new suffixes would rival ".com" and about 300 others now in use. Companies would be able to create separate websites and separate addresses for each of their products and brands, even as they keep their existing ".com" name. Businesses that joined the Internet late, and found desirable ".com" names taken, would have alternatives.
Apple is the only company to request the .apple suffix, while others such as .app, .shop, and .web have seen multiple applicants vying for the rights. Google, Microsoft, and Amazon are also active participants in the application process, with each of them seeking to secure a number of suffixes related to their businesses.

Should Apple's application be approved, Internet users could find themselves accessing product pages for the iPhone and iPad at iphone.apple and ipad.apple respectively, simplifying advertising and making the URLs shorter and easier to remember.

Article Link: Apple Applies for '.apple' Domain Name Suffix
 

lifeinhd

macrumors 65816
Mar 26, 2008
1,389
7
127.0.0.1
TBH, I think this is more confusing than just remembering .com, .org, or .net, which are the only important ones.
 

bushido

Suspended
Mar 26, 2008
8,070
2,754
Germany
didnt they become kinda obsolete anyway? i never type "WWW.xy.COM" anymore. simply "amazon" or "apple" does the trick nowadays
 

nvbrit

macrumors 6502
Oct 12, 2007
325
1
Reno, NV
Exactly how is iPhone.apple and iPad.apple shorter and easier to remember than the respective names with .com after them?
 

macmastersam

macrumors 6502a
Sep 14, 2011
515
0
Essex, england
nice, its kinda cool when a domian has a .(suffix) instead of a .com or .uk suffix IMO. not that there is anything wrong with the '.com' or the '.uk', but i think it also makes the website and the company look more private as well :)
 

Josh M

macrumors newbie
Apr 20, 2012
25
1
Brisbane
Hope they secure '.app'.
Huge potential for developers especially with .app.

Imagine something like airbnb.app or instagram.app as a domain to directly find these app pages/downloads etc.

Also, remember they may not use these domain names, rather may be securing them from other domain sitters.
 

arbitter

macrumors regular
Nov 12, 2010
109
1
Belgium
I don't see why you would by a whole top-level domain. iphone.apple.com or apple.com/iphone looks nicer to me than iphone.apple.

But as said, could be just to cover themselves from malafide/adult material. Or perhaps handy for future expension.

Anyhow, it is indeed going to get complicated if certain companies stop having .com domains and only .company domains, for the companies that are 'late' for getting a good .com domain. Others can just redirect ofcourse.
 

mkoesel

macrumors 6502
Mar 31, 2005
266
72
It seems to me that apple.iphone, apple.ipad, apple.macbook, apple.imac etc. would be more natural and easier to remember. So I would not be surprised to see Apple, with their huge cash reserves, to apply for all of these suffixes and others.

I wonder if single letter second level names will be allowed with these new suffixes? Such as a.apple? Or, perhaps even better, a.pple? Those are not allowed (reserved by IANA) for the standard .com, .net, .org, etc, but are allowed for the country specific and other suffixes.
 

ForzaJuve

macrumors member
Jul 20, 2009
67
3
Just Curious

I am kind of curious to see how many applied to the .porn domain.

I like the idea of the .company name and the application fee expensive enough to prevent everyone and their moms to try and snatch every possible and imaiginable random domain name to make a future profit form selling it in case it turns out to be a good one.
 

unlinked

macrumors 6502a
Jul 12, 2010
697
1,217
Ireland
Exactly how is iPhone.apple and iPad.apple shorter and easier to remember than the respective names with .com after them?
They are a little shorter but not really any easier to remember.

They have iphone.apple.com and iphone.com now. Do they ever use them?
I think they will stick with just putting the hot product of the moment on the front page of apple.com.
 

KnightWRX

macrumors Pentium
Jan 28, 2009
15,046
4
Quebec, Canada
ICANN is nuts to be offering this. Comon words as TLDs just reverts the Internet to some kind of AOL like keyword system. Proper DNS hierarchy wasn't broken, this breaks it if anything. The root-servers are going to get hit hard when TLDs multiply.

Way to destroy a good system in the name of profit.
 

rdas7

macrumors regular
Nov 17, 2002
165
22
London, England
Surely that would be apple/ipad and apple/iphone ? Why a subdomain?

Also, this ties in nicely with the next version of Safari getting a unified search/url bar (ie. one box instead of 2 separate ones). If you were to type in 'apple' you'd go straight to their site, instead of over to google with the results of a search for the word "apple".
 

KnightWRX

macrumors Pentium
Jan 28, 2009
15,046
4
Quebec, Canada
It seems to me that apple.iphone, apple.ipad, apple.macbook, apple.imac etc. would be more natural and easier to remember. So I would not be surprised to see Apple, with their huge cash reserves, to apply for all of these suffixes and others.

I wonder if single letter second level names will be allowed with these new suffixes? Such as a.apple? Or, perhaps even better, a.pple? Those are not allowed (reserved by IANA) for the standard .com, .net, .org, etc, but are allowed for the country specific and other suffixes.
Once you control your own TLD, you can do whatever you like after wards, you're in charge of the zone file.

That extends to anything, as soon as you have authority over a certain zone. It's yours, manage it how you want.
 

KnightWRX

macrumors Pentium
Jan 28, 2009
15,046
4
Quebec, Canada
Surely that would be apple/ipad and apple/iphone ? Why a subdomain?

Also, this ties in nicely with the next version of Safari getting a unified search/url bar (ie. one box instead of 2 separate ones). If you were to type in 'apple' you'd go straight to their site, instead of over to google with the results of a search for the word "apple".
Depends how the bar treats single words, with no dots or indication that it is actually a URL. Will it send the single word as a DNS query first and only as a search query if it receives an NXDOMAIN response ?

I don't have a Chrome installation handy, I'm curious, I never noticed how Chrome treats it. My internal domain uses a custom TLD (not available on the Internet of course), I could give this a try and see how Google treats it.
 
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