apple care and SSD removal

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by th0masp, Mar 16, 2015.

  1. th0masp macrumors member

    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2015
    Location:
    germany
    #1
    hi,

    first post here but a longtime mac user/owner currently on a late 2011 machine with aftermarket upgrades.

    i am looking at replacing my current mac sometime later this year with a new 13 or 15 inch macbook pro. now, since RAM and storage are no longer user-replaceable I'm wondering how everyone here handles protecting their data when the machine has to be handed over to support?

    is opening the case and removing the SSD by the user prior to handing the machine over voiding apple care? will the support guys in an apple store remove the drive themselves and hand it back to you before taking the machine in if you request it? anybody been there/done that?

    i have rather strict confidentiality clauses in my contracts and am not comfortable at all with the idea of potentially having somebody go through my system drive. all my previous machines have been user-upgradeable so the problem has never even come up so far.
     
  2. yjchua95 macrumors 604

    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2011
    Location:
    GVA, KUL, MEL (current), ZQN
    #2
    Use FileVault.

    Problem solved.

    FileVault uses XTS-AES128 to encrypt the drive, and the key itself is AES-256 encrypted. Not even the NSA can crack it open.

    FileVault is also FIPS 140-2 compliant, meaning that it's approved for use in American and Canadian government departments.

    Opening the case will void the warranty.
     
  3. Android300zx macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2012
    #3
    Thanks for the Filevault suggestion. Noted.
     
  4. Gav2k macrumors G3

    Gav2k

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2009
    #4
    If they ask for access for testing just create a temp admin account for them. Your files will still be protected. More often than not they will boot from a different drive for diagnostic purposes.
     
  5. Android300zx macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2012
    #5
    That's cool man. I like that. I get paranoid of people looking through my stuff besides I have some sensitive information on there. I'm a habitual serial dater.
     
  6. th0masp thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2015
    Location:
    germany
    #6
    hey thanks for your tip. that would solve the access problem from the looks of it. it does seem however that the process is a bit flaky in yosemite at the moment (going by google results here) and that it is non-reversible?

    so the consequence is that you are basically locking yourself out of manual file restore operations from a computer in target disk mode or a clone of your system drive if i understand correctly?
     
  7. snaky69 macrumors 603

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2008
    #7
    Enable Filevault and have a guest account setup with restricted access to your files for eventual repairs.
     
  8. yjchua95 macrumors 604

    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2011
    Location:
    GVA, KUL, MEL (current), ZQN
    #8
    It's reversible.

    But make sure you've a backup.

    The process isn't flaky.

    One thing though, if you forget the password, you have to reformat the entire drive and lose everything.
     
  9. mlts22 macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2008
    #9
    If the files are very sensitive, I'd consider firing up Disk Utility, and storing your files in an encrypted disk image (I use a sparse bundle). This allows you to have them present when you log on, but if you have another user on the machine, it prevents them from getting access.

    Filevault 2, once any admin is logged on, they can see all users' files on the device.
     
  10. windywalks macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Mar 12, 2004
    #10
    Opening the case itself doesn't void anything by itself, but handing the computer over sans SSD would definitely be frowned upon. Just use FileVault as other posters suggested and you'll be fine.
     

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