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Apple this morning announced the expansion of its "Everyone Can Code" initiative to 70 educational institutions across Europe, and following the announcement, Apple CEO Tim Cook spoke at Harlow College in Essex, one of the schools that will adopt the new curriculum.

The Guardian shared several of Cook's comments, which covered overuse of technology and boundaries for children.

Cook said he believes there are concepts that can't be taught using technology, and in many courses, technology shouldn't dominate.
"I don't believe in overuse [of technology]. I'm not a person that says we've achieved success if you're using it all the time," he said. "I don't subscribe to that at all."

Even in computer-aided courses, such as graphic design, technology should not dominate, he said.

"There are are still concepts that you want to talk about and understand. In a course on literature, do I think you should use technology a lot? Probably not."
According to Cook, Apple cares about children out of the classroom, a topic that's notable as Apple investors recently urged Apple to do more to protect children from smartphone addiction.

Apple in early January said in a statement that it thinks deeply about how its products are used and the impact they have on people, including children. Apple takes its responsibility to protect children "very seriously," and has promised more robust parental controls for iOS devices in the future.

Though he does not have children of his own, Cook says in his own personal life, he "put some boundaries" on his nephew. "There here are some things that I won't allow; I don't want them on a social network," he said.

On the topic of learning to code, Cook spoke passionately, as he has done several times in the past. Learning to code, he says, is more important than learning a foreign language.
Cook said: "I think if you had to make a choice, it's more important to learn coding than a foreign language. I know people who disagree with me on that. But coding is a global language; it's the way you can converse with 7 billion people."
Cook's full commentary, which covers diversity, coding at an early age, and the importance of the press, can be read over at The Guardian.

Article Link: Apple CEO Tim Cook Discusses Overusing Technology in New Interview
 

swingerofbirch

macrumors 68040
I know it's not what he meant, but it's kind of funny to say that a course on literature need not have technology. The word technology has obviously evolved, but written language in any form is said by some, and I would agree, to be humans' greatest invention and a groundbreaking technoogy. And then multiplied by the printed press. But that's a minor quibble given that the word technology has taken on a more specific meaning.
 
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Dorje Sylas

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Jun 8, 2011
504
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That's cool and all... but who's going to actually fund basic computer science education. So far I've read and heard a lot of lip service from big companies like Apple and Amazon, but the money isn't flowing to actual classroom teachers.
 
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kwikdeth

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Feb 25, 2003
1,058
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Tempe, AZ
Like everything else, it automatically comes down to the individual. Just because one person doesn't have a problem with saying no to something that stimulates certain pleasure centers of the brain, there's no guarantee that the next person coming down the line won't have a problem with it as well. It's just like alcohol or anything else. Some people can handle it without a problem, others can't.
 
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hlfway2anywhere

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Jul 15, 2006
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"I'm not a person that says we've achieved success if you're using it all the time," he said. "I don't subscribe to that at all."

"There are still concepts that you want to talk about and understand. In a course on literature, do I think you should use technology a lot? Probably not."

Literally the opposite of the headline but okay.
 
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SgtPepper12

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Feb 1, 2011
678
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Germany
Let's just say, in case you have English down, then I'd probably rather learn some programming language than another foreign language assuming I have to choose. But English is incredibly important to learn these days, it's probably something native speakers aren't completely aware of.

By the way, It's funny how he said the exact opposite from what the title of this article suggests. You should probably change that.
 
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HopefulHumanist

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Jan 28, 2015
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... says the CEO of a multinational technology company, whose compensation is tied almost entirely to revenue and profit performance.

That's like asking an ExxonMobil exec whether he believes oil use is related to climate change.
If you read the actual article, you'd see that the headline is wrong and that he actually does believe overuse of technology is real and not desirable.
 
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pika2000

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Jun 22, 2007
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Learning to code, he says, is more important than learning a foreign language.
Oh how mistaken he is. If I can repeat my young life, learning more foreign languages would be the top things I would do. Simply learning a language like Chinese can take you to far more places than knowing java/phyton. People do business using human language, not codes.
 
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thadoggfather

macrumors G5
Oct 1, 2007
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It’s weird the way he said this

He does not believe in it. As in like that it exists? or the "philosophy" of overuse which no one is advocating for?

Of course that’s not a benchmark for success. Everyone is a zombie (myself included) with a screen in front of them. We’re WALL-E’d out

Thanks Tim!
 
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