Price Advice Apple Cinema Display vs. ___________? *Need advice FAST*

Discussion in 'Buying Tips and Advice' started by Sam5281, Jun 12, 2014.

  1. Sam5281 macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2014
    #1
    Need knowledgable advice here:

    Ready to buy a quality external monitor for Photoshop/lightroom photo editing.

    Using a late 2008 MBP:
    (Mini dp)
    (1440 x 900)
    (NVIDIA GeForce 9400M 256 MB graphics)

    Should I buy an Apple Refurb 27" Cinema Display: $700

    OR ?

    Please let me know if it's my best option - open to other suggestions!

    Budget is right around that price - don't want to break 1k mark.
     
  2. Pakaku macrumors 68000

    Pakaku

    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2009
    #2
    Dell is pretty much the place to go for monitors. Look into their Ultrasharp line.
     
  3. FrankHahn macrumors 6502a

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    May 17, 2011
  4. monokakata macrumors 68000

    monokakata

    Joined:
    May 8, 2008
    Location:
    Hilo, Hawai'i
    #4
    Don't forget to consider adjustments (or the lack thereof). If you want height adjustment and swiveling you don't want an Apple display.

    And don't forget glossy vs. matte. If you want matte, no Apple for you.
     
  5. Sam5281 thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2014
    #5
    Well...

    Cinema display was purchased by someone else. That's out of the question now
     
  6. phrehdd macrumors 68040

    phrehdd

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2008
    #6
    Consider a monitor that can be calibrated easily and is designed for graphics.

    Dell, HP, Eizo and NEC all offer excellent choices. I personally use an NEC PA series monitor that is certainly better than Apple's offerings. Please do understand I have used both iMac and also owned at one time the 30" Apple monitor.

    While I believe that the NEC and Eizo are the "best" options, the Dell is cheaper and very close (last I checked, it was the Ultra series). The HP monitors also are no slouch and any of these are better for graphics/photo than the Apple monitors.
     
  7. chrono1081 macrumors 604

    chrono1081

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2008
    Location:
    Isla Nublar
    #7
    Apple Cinema Display is fine OP. I have two and they're fantastic and extremely accurate color wise.

    People become "monitor snobbish" and forget that no matter how hard they try and control color it's never going to be perfect from monitor to print.

    Sure you can go with a pricer Eizo if you want but I'd save my money. I also disagree with those here who claim Dell Ultrasharps are good. We have them at work and I don't think they're as good as people make them. I don't care for the "screen shimmer" of dells anti-glare coating.
     
  8. 12dylan34 macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Sep 3, 2009
    #8
    The Cinema and Thunderbolt displays or inferior in color gamut to other displays in their price range. I bought a refurb HP ZR2740w 27 inch IPS panel, which is just as sharp as my old 27 inch iMac display (same panel as the TBD), and it displays far more colors (1.07 billion vs, 16.7 million - the difference between 8 and 16 bit color) for $350 on Amazon. New they're like $700, I think.

    The only advantages that the Apple displays have, is that they have a better design and they work with your Mac's built in brightness controls, etc. I also prefer the glossy coating that Apple displays have to the antiglare that my HP has, but that's personal preference.

    Some would say that I'm being a "snob," but a display like the Cinema or TBD, which only does 8 bit color is unacceptable for working in higher color depths, which I do regularly.
     
  9. MrGIS macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2010
    Location:
    Ontario Canada
    #9
    The ACD is gorgeous no bones about it, however if you have or anticipate a need to connect other devices, then I suggest the 27 inch Dell Ultrasharp.

    US

    http://accessories.us.dell.com/sna/...5~0~15892799,233672~0~15116334&s=dhs&~ck=anav

    Canada (Cheaper!)

    http://accessories.dell.com/sna/pro...l.aspx?c=ca&l=en&s=dhs&cs=cadhs1&sku=225-4015

    The ACD is limited to one input only, and that can very very limiting.

    The Dell also pivots out of the box, while the ACD would require a different mounting solution.

    The panels are the same as I understand it. Either way you end up with a great display, just consider your needs carefully.
     
  10. phrehdd, Jun 14, 2014
    Last edited: Jun 14, 2014

    phrehdd macrumors 68040

    phrehdd

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2008
    #10
    Having owned iMac and in the past the 30" ACD, I found that some of the above mentioned non-Apple monitors worked as well if not better for serious graphics/photo work. I would suggest the OP not take yours or my word for it but do some exploring on the internet for reviews and "on paper" measurements related to the specs of some offerings. Again we'll find that the Apple displays are not without merit but certainly have competition and offerings that hands down are superior to the ACD and iMacs. This is not opinion but summation based on facts.

    Here is an excerpt from Digilloyd site that some of "us snobs" might find amusing -

    Faux calibration

    The term “calibration” is abused: true calibration means bringing the hardware device (the display) to a specified target state. The actual behavior vs specified target is then measured, and a profile is generated that describes the differences.

    With most so-called “calibration”, the display itself cannot and does not change. In short, it is not calibrated at all. Instead, 8-bit video card data is altered in an attempt to produce an image that approximates the proper intensity and color, using repeated measurements. This is impossible to do well in 8 bit, particularly in darker tones, where there are only a few bits to work with (not even 8 bits!). But even 8 bits is woefully inadequate, certainly so in a 3D color space.

    Thus “calibrating” an Apple display or other brand is actually not calibration at all, but a laughably crude lipstick on a pig effort that is often worse than the stock Apple profile supplied by Apple. Whether the hardware calibration is done with a $100 or $5000 calibrator doesn’t matter: no actual calibration occurs (the display does not actually change other than perhaps contrast and brightness), Rather, 8 bits on the video card approximate
     
  11. chrono1081 macrumors 604

    chrono1081

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2008
    Location:
    Isla Nublar
    #11
    Yea and I call BS on that entire quote. My monitor matches my prints just fine and I use the so called "lip stick on a pig" approach of letting my colorimeter make a profile for me.

    Again, nothing but snobbery from people forgetting that years ago we didn't have the sharp, crisp monitors we do today but work still got done just fine.
     
  12. Sam5281 thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2014
    #12
    Just purchased a new retina MBP - and Thunderbolt display :)

    Will be here this week
     
  13. phrehdd macrumors 68040

    phrehdd

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2008
    #13
    I'll simply stop here as you are embarrassing yourself and no need to further comment. Let's move on.
     
  14. pogoyoyo macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2010
    Location:
    Toronto, Canada
    #14
    I don't want to go off topic here or anything but for what you're doing, it sounds like you need a new laptop instead of new monitor...
     
  15. chrono1081 macrumors 604

    chrono1081

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2008
    Location:
    Isla Nublar
    #15
    I'm not embarrassing myself at all. My prints and my monitor match, that's the goal. I don't see a problem here.

    When I worked in IT I supported studios who have all the high end fancy monitors and we have the Dell Ultrasharps at my current job. I don't see what the hubbub is about.

    You feel differently than I do apparently. I am basing my observations on experience.
     
  16. McCrab macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2006
    #16
    I have found this to be a great combo. Also added the promise tb2 raid. Very productive and flexible set up
     
  17. phrehdd macrumors 68040

    phrehdd

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2008
    #17
    Your comment about snobbery is what remains more than suspect. I am glad your set up works for you however, other monitors do a better job at both calibration and have a larger colour space. There is no snobbery involved just purchases based on spec and need. I am unsure of why you insist on being steadfast with your acrid comment.
     
  18. righteye macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2011
    Location:
    London
    #18
    If you want a WYSIWYG set up (for Printing) you need a monitor that can be adjusted down to 80-100cd or you will end up getting dark prints, you will think they look correct on a bright contrasty monitor but will be printed dark (compared to the monitor) ideally it would be good to have a retina display of some sort for web browsing and photo display and then an Eizo or Nec for print editing. A Monitor snob :)
     
  19. vinnie110 macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2008
    #19
    Just been through this and went with Dell U2713H has wide gamut which ACD doesn't. Oh it's non reflective ACD isn't.
    The only done is no thunderbolt dock

    ----------

    ASUS also do a very good monitor.
     
  20. Apple fanboy macrumors P6

    Apple fanboy

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    Feb 21, 2012
    Location:
    Behind the Lens, UK
    #20
    I have a 21" iMac sitting next to a NEC Spectraview 241 monitor. I know which gets closest to what I shot and print by a good mile!
     
  21. phrehdd macrumors 68040

    phrehdd

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2008
    #21
    I have an NEC PA241w and in the past iMacs and also Apple 30" monitor. You don't have to guess which one gave me the best and as importantly the most consistent results. Perhaps in 2015 I may move up to a 27" or 30" monitor but I really find the 24" works very well for me with the distance I work from the monitor and love the ability to work in portrait as well.
     
  22. Apple fanboy macrumors P6

    Apple fanboy

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    Feb 21, 2012
    Location:
    Behind the Lens, UK
    #22
    With a duel monitor set up, 24" is more than enough for me.
     
  23. mjfutures macrumors member

    mjfutures

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2014
    #23
    Viewsonic VP2770

    I really enjoy the Viewsonic VP2770. I have used all of the monitors in this class and price range and this one has been great for photo editing and general computer use. http://www.amazon.com/ViewSonic-VP2...alibrated/dp/B00906HNZU/ref=cm_srch_res_rtr_1

    27-Inch Wide Super IPS LED monitor
    178 / 178 super wide viewing angles
    2560x1440 High Resolution Display
    Full ergonomics (pivot, height, tilt, swivel)
    Slim Bezel for multi-monitor applications
     
  24. Tim S macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2006
    #24
    Have a look at Asus

    I have just purchased an Asus PA249Q recently and I have found it to be a very affordable compromise. 10 bit colour, Adobe 1998. calibrated it with a ColorMunki photo, but was pretty close right out of the box.

    http://www.asus.com/Monitors_Projectors/PA249Q/

    -
     
  25. doc4x5 macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2008
    Location:
    the great Pacific northwest
    #25
    get an NEC

    If you speak to photographers, not just snobs, you'll likely hear that many would like to have an Eizo, but since they're sooo expensive, they (me) "settle" for an NEC. I have the PA271, since replaced by an upgraded model, with the Spectraview profiling software and NEC puck. Colors are spot on, profiling is a simple plug it in and tell it what to do. I used it with my now retired Mac Pro 3.1 and now it's just lovely with my new Mac Pro 6.1. NEC's are hard to beat for quality and price, and no I don't work for them, or anyone else.
    Just a Retired Bum
     

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