Apple Community Raises Over $13 Million for Hurricane Relief and Recovery Efforts

Discussion in 'iOS Blog Discussion' started by MacRumors, Sep 28, 2017.

  1. MacRumors macrumors bot

    MacRumors

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    Following a series of natural disasters that have impacted tens of thousands of people in the United States, Mexico, and the Caribbean, Apple employees and customers have raised more than $13 million to provide shelter, food, and clean water in areas devastated by earthquakes and hurricanes.

    Apple shared the update in a news post released this morning. Funds have been raised in the wake of Hurricane Harvey, which impacted Texas and Louisiana, Hurricane Irma, which hit the Gulf Coast, Florida Keys, and several Caribbean Islands, Hurricane Maria, which hit Puerto Rico, and earthquakes that hit Mexico.

    Along with raising money, many Apple employees stepped up to volunteer for recovery efforts, running food drives, opening their homes, transporting clean water, and more.

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    Apple is continuing to raise money for relief efforts in Puerto Rico and other U.S. communities by accepting donations to the American Red Cross and the Hand in Hand hurricane relief benefit, with customers already having raised more than $2 million.

    Employee donations to the American Red Cross, Hand in Hand, GlobalGiving, and UNICEF are being matched two-to-one by Apple, and the company says that it donated $1 million to the American Red Cross and UNICEF for Hurricane Maria relief and $1 million to GlobalGiving for earthquake recovery efforts in Mexico.

    These donations are on top of several other donations Apple has made over the course of the last month. Apple donated $5 million to the Hand in Hand benefit for hurricane relief efforts, and another $2 million to help Hurricane Harvey victims.

    iTunes and App Store customers can easily donate by clicking on the American Red Cross banner in the respective stores and choosing an amount to donate.

    Article Link: Apple Community Raises Over $13 Million for Hurricane Relief and Recovery Efforts
     
  2. Michaelgtrusa macrumors 604

    Michaelgtrusa

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    #2
    I hope the goes over well and people GET what they need in a timely manner.
     
  3. jiggad369 macrumors regular

    jiggad369

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    It's what makes this country great.

    Only if bigots understood what unity is.
     
  4. GrumpyMom macrumors 603

    GrumpyMom

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    That's great! Puerto Rico alone is basically in an apocalyptic state. It will take billions of dollars and years to rebuild. I think a lot of the people we know are just trying to bring their families here. They're already US citizens so there's no immigration barrier or refugee status to negotiate, thank goodness. But transportation remains a huge impasse right now.

    Edit to add...just think about it: ALL of their agricultural is said to be GONE. Just...wiped out.
     
  5. alfonsog macrumors 6502

    alfonsog

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    #5
    My restaurant survived Irma (but we got completely destroyed by Charlie in 2004) and one of my cooks has property and family in Puerto Rico and is trying to arrange a visit. A lot of the donated money doesn’t get to the people even though everyone feels good donating. Puerto Rico had so much corruption but when everything is wiped out even the corrupt are screwed.
     
  6. GrumpyMom macrumors 603

    GrumpyMom

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    Perhaps now even the infrastructure for the corruption has been destroyed and the people can at last be helped. From what I'm hearing right now, it's not so much about corruption, but physical barriers. There's so much flooding and debris isolating neighborhoods and now a dust storm making it dangerous for planes to get in and out. They don't have equipment operational for air traffic control. There are wrecked planes everywhere around the landing fields that the hurricane tossed around.

    I saw that somebody managed to bring in a bag of satellite phones and let huge lines of people call to let their families know they are still alive. That alone made such a huge difference to people there, but they probably need more donations like that. I honestly didn't even know about satellite phones until I saw that on the news. Now I'm reading about them and they are very expensive. They would make a great donation but it was only one guy who was a resident there who made the trip out and back with the phones. No matter what we donate, it sounds like the bottleneck is logistics. Getting in and out.

    One of the residents that was interviewed wants martial law and military help at this point. He didn't say why, but given that he was standing in the middle of the worst looking mess I've seen to match any war zone in Syria, I guess he didn't need to explain.

    Trump finally lifted the red tape they needed to get shipments. My husband has coworkers with families in Puerto Rico. They're not even thinking of letting them stay for any rebuilding effort. First thing is trying to get in touch again now that word got out as to where they are and that they survived and next is trying to get them out. I think that is what a lot of employers and smaller charities are trying to do now, help people here get their families out to the mainland. It's getting too dire too fast to even think of doing anything but triage over there unless people really want to stay.

    I'm involved in local animal rescue and from what little I've heard most efforts for the animals is focused on getting them out and to the mainland. They aren't even trying to adopt out any animals within PR because there's not enough for even the people to survive on now. I have not heard much, though. Everyone was already overwhelmed with the animals displaced by Harvey. Heck, I'm still seeing older long term foster animals from Katrina in the system! :(
     
  7. alex00100 macrumors regular

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    #7
    That’s like about how much this company makes in a minute?
     
  8. Apple of my eye macrumors member

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    #8
    People spent over $145,000,000,000 on iPhones alone last year. Keeping the still relevant iPhone 6 and helping a lot of people makes more sense than an iPhone 8.
     
  9. GrumpyMom macrumors 603

    GrumpyMom

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    True, but I would be surprised if Apple weren’t in it for a long term. A lot of even smaller and local companies are. Businesses are actually more generous than we like to talk about because it doesn’t fit in with the greedy capitalist image we rail against when corporations do evil things. But some businesses, especially small businesses, do have a heart. When Katrina hit, the company my husband was working for at the time worked some small miracles for individual families. The press never covered that because it was well after the immediate drama of the disaster aftermath. Apple and its employees may well continue efforts we will never hear about.

    The relief efforts are a continuing thing. This isn’t one time. This aid effort is going to take YEARS. Especially in Puerto Rico. When it comes to Puerto Rico, donations in the coming days and weeks will help just as much as early donations. They’re reporting that they are still working to physically get through to people isolated by debris and flooding. Once they get through, and someone (the military?) establishes a way to actually distribute assistance, we will see how much more is really needed. We haven’t seen anything, yet. Right now the people there have no way of hearing what people here are trying to do for them and are starting to panic. The people here aren’t sure what the people there can actually get delivered to them. It’s early days and horrible.

    It’s something we need to pay attention to long term and not just until the news moves on to something else. It’s going to fall to community organizations and churches to keep efforts going locally. Almost everyone where I live knows someone or has family in one of the Hurricane relief areas. They’re the ones keeping churches and charities informed of what the needs are.
    --- Post Merged, Sep 28, 2017 ---
    That makes sense. I have an iPhone 7 Plus and am in no rush to upgrade given that the purchasing decision is so fraught with uncertainty anyway, so, yeah, I definitely can spare something for relief efforts.
     
  10. ericinboston macrumors 68000

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    #10
    Although I applaud any donation, this pales compared to the NFL quarterback who raised close to 40mill. Now that's a news story.
     
  11. Nicky G, Sep 28, 2017
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 29, 2017

    Nicky G macrumors 6502a

    Nicky G

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    #11
    Puerto Rico and the US Virgin Islands -- parts of the United States of America, and whose primary residents are US citizens -- are in full-on Katrina (but worse) mode right now.

    The USVI and swaths of Puerto Rico appear to be GONE. Have you seen the pictures? Every tree on the islands seem to have been utterly stripped-bare. Most of the buildings on the USVI seem to be irreparably damaged, and many in Puerto Rico. Electricity will be down for months, total food and water supply chain knockout.
     
  12. alex00100 macrumors regular

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    Come on don’t even start protecting Apple or any other corporation. I don’t know anything about generosity of small businesses but 13 millions is about the what you’d need to build maybe 20 houses..? It’s good, but it’s not apple scale. If apple genuinely wanted to help and did it with the same passion that they work on their products they would have easily raised 100s of millions and completely eliminated any damages there were.
     
  13. Mike MA macrumors 68000

    Mike MA

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    Nice to see people, and many many others, taking action here. At least over here in Europe the buzz before the hurrican and what could happen was much bigger compared to the coverage of its outcome and especially consequences right at the very moment.
     
  14. NomadicTy macrumors regular

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    You might be talking about JJ Watt, a defensive end for the Houston Texans. And his donation drive was only for the first of these recent disasters - Harvey in Houston, and before the others happened. So, yeah, 13 million pales when compared to that... But anything helps.
     
  15. GrumpyMom macrumors 603

    GrumpyMom

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    #15
    You completely failed to understand anything I said. I wasn't protecting Apple. I'm not their publicist or their lawyer. I'm talking about this being just the beginning for everyone, so I'd be surprised that any fund raising effort by anyone is even remotely done yet.

    And stow your hostility. I'm just having conversation, not an argument. Actually I was agreeing with you, it's a small amount for them, so I was thinking it's not a one time end-all figure and that's it. Especially not for the aftermath of three monster hurricanes.

    As taxpayers it's going to cost us billions for generations. As people involved in charitable giving, it will take years of giving to different causes as needs become more clear and defined over time to different organizations. There will be fund drives to rebuild. There will be fund drives to resettle families. Fund drives to adopt out animals that survived.

    Your location says you're in Moscow. Is that actually where you are? If so, what cause do you have to be attacking me? Do you know people involved in the relief efforts or people that's been trying to contact family through these three hurricanes? I do. I never saw so much chaos and devastation hit my country and my own friends and family and their friends and family at one time like this. One monster storm after another. I will come here and joke and obsess about iPhones along with everyone else because it's not appropriate to dump my worries here on this forum. But then I set my phone or iPad down and go back to the ugly real world concerns.
     
  16. alex00100 macrumors regular

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    #16
    Dude relax. No one is attacking you, get used to internet.
    this is exactly what I meant. There's devastation and chaos there and apple could easily give enough money to fix it all in a second and yet we will be fixing it with our taxes for years and years.
    For information I'm Moscow born but I lived in Florida in the hurricane affected areas for a couple years and still have many friends there, though right now I live in LA.
     
  17. GrumpyMom macrumors 603

    GrumpyMom

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    #17
    Are you involved with any disaster relief efforts through your employer? If so, what do you think of their efforts?

    My husband is and their setup is similar to Apple's, with employees far from the affected areas contributing money and some who live near affected areas also donating time. They have a Houston office and the employees there are very active in the community relief efforts. The company matches employee donations and has kicked in its own contribution. As for Florida, Puerto Rico and Mexico and other disaster areas like the parts of India that were flooded out, that is all handled mainly through donations and a matching program since it's not practical for anyone to take leave and go to those places.

    For my part, as a housewife, the best I can do personally is give up the plan to get one of the new iPhones and put what I was going to put toward that into something like reuniting people in PR with their families on the mainland. That would be my first choice because we actually know the people who need help.

    Here is something I tell the kids. It's what my father told me and it has served me well: Don't expect the world or anybody in it to give you anything but a kick in the ass. Don't waste a precious minute worrying what others should or could be doing. Answer for yourself.

    To that end, I don't expect any white knight, corporate or otherwise, to ride in and fix everything in a second. Nor do I waste any time wondering about it. Even allowing for the fact that you're employing hyperbole to make a point, such expectations are not realistic. Corporations have never been able to do what you're suggesting. Time after time we have seen mighty corporations go under. Apple is not guaranteed eternal success and profitability and existence. Especially not if people continue to be as ticked off at them as they seem to be over the 2017 product lineup. They would be foolish to squander or give away too much from their reserves. Chinese upstarts are practically salivating at the chance to take Apple down. You never know, a few years from now this could turn into the Huawei Rumors forum.

    I understand the impulse you feel to question all of this, truly. Sometimes I find myself wondering what George Soros and the Koch Brothers and any number of billionaires are doing for the people they exploit in times like this. Besides engineering society to kiss their butts and work in their favor, what do they really do with all of the money and power and influence they wield?

    Then I stop myself when I realize on the smallest of scales, I'm no better unless I give up something, significant, myself. I'm not going to sit around worrying what other people are doing. I don't have to look at them in the mirror. I'll just worry if I am doing enough.
     
  18. alex00100 macrumors regular

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    #18
    I really liked this part. I see your point now. Guess it’s up to us to save the world now lol.
     
  19. GrumpyMom macrumors 603

    GrumpyMom

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    Yes:

    IMG_0522.JPG
     
  20. kdarling, Oct 1, 2017
    Last edited: Oct 1, 2017

    kdarling macrumors demi-god

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    #20
    True, it is an opportunity to start from scratch. For one thing, the tax incentives for manufacturers that was taken away ten years ago needs to be put back. The economy dropped after that, unemployment rose. The median income ($19K !) is now half that of even the poorest US states, but with a higher cost of living due in part to shipping import costs. (Hawaii has the same import problem. Alaska mostly too.)

    That's caused a middle class population drain as well, with those who can afford it, moving to the mainland.

    Was that the NYC. banker who flew in his private plane down to help?

    There's been looting. Honest people want protection.

    Shipping is not the problem with aid. Already 10,000 shipping containers of food, water, medicine have been delivered to the San Juan port. But they're just sitting there.

    The problem is that the roads are blocked/damaged and truck drivers can't even come to pick up the stuff, much less deliver it around the island.

    The smartest thing would be if the entire population was called upon to help clear the roads, instead of waiting for others to do so. Then aid could be delivered so they could do more. It's almost a Catch-22.
     
  21. GrumpyMom macrumors 603

    GrumpyMom

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    #21
    There are now some reports saying there's a truck drivers strike there so drivers aren't showing up. I don't know if that is true or not. I don't know what to believe from the press anymore.
     
  22. kdarling, Oct 1, 2017
    Last edited: Oct 1, 2017

    kdarling macrumors demi-god

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    #22
    Apparently that was a (possibly intentional) bad translation. Trouble with today's internet is that anyone can post whatever they want, and some news site somewhere will repeat it without checking, and then it echoes all over the place.

    Seems more like this: the majority of commercially licensed drivers are still at home taking care of their families. They might not even know they're needed, due to the lack of power and communications. Also fuel is hard to come by. And even though some mayors claim roads are passable to their towns, others say they're still too dangerous for large trucks.

    Reportedly the Teamsters are sending drivers from the US to help out. And mainland troops are starting to clear roads.

    I do think people have unrealistic expectations about how fast help can reach everywhere. One thing Katrina and Sandy and later storms have unfortunately shown, is that it can take weeks even on the mainland in relatively small areas, to get just power and fuel available again.
     
  23. GrumpyMom macrumors 603

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    #23
    That explanation makes far more sense than there being a teamsters strike. Honestly, the media is such a mess these days.

    I remember when a derecho struck my region. The apex of my roof was sheared off due to it consisting of a metal ridge vent. Our windows almost exploded outward. They were buckling like I'd never seen windows ever do. I don't know the physics of it but it was scary to see. A tree crashed into my in-laws house and they had to live with us while rain poured into our attic through the opening until the roofer could get up there with a tarp until his schedule would allow for a permanent repair. He had so many damaged roofs to attend to it was a long time before he could fix ours.

    Then there were my parents over in another county. I remember the drive to their house to see how they were. They were without power and their next door neighbor was sharing generator power with them. I wanted to bring them back to stay with me, but full power got restored right as I was visiting. The familiar route to their house looked like nothing I had ever seen. It was sort of like a salad apocalypse, with green everywhere from tree leaves, tree limbs, whole trees scattered about. They don't live in a nice neighborhood under the best of circumstances and it looked a bit wild and woolly with downed trees everywhere and no electricity and everything looking chaotic and wild with gangs roaming out and about, taking advantage of the police being preoccupied with other things. We had so much difficulty getting there and could not have made it in a regular car. It required our SUV to navigate suburban roads that day! :eek:

    That was so tame and minor compared to the devastation I've seen in footage and from witness accounts in PR. So I can easily fathom the logistical nightmare the rescue and aid teams are running into.
     
  24. Nand macrumors regular

    Nand

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    #24
    Near my home.
    --- Post Merged, Oct 1, 2017 ---
    The people are cleaning the roads, we are not waiting for anyone to do that.
    --- Post Merged, Oct 1, 2017 ---

    This is one of the big news paper in the island. They have a English version.

    https://www.elnuevodia.com/english/
     

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  25. GrumpyMom macrumors 603

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    Thank you!
     

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