Apple Details Why Some Apple Card Applicants Might Get Declined

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Apple last week announced an Apple Card Preview period and has since been rolling out Apple Card availability to many iPhone users ahead of a wider launch.

Apple aimed to make the Apple Card available to as many people as possible and there have been reports of people with credit scores in the 600s being approved, but there are still reasons why someone might get denied.


In a new support document shared today, Apple outlines the various reasons why someone might be declined, including low credit score, frequent credit card applications, heavy debt and low income, tax liens, bankruptcy, property repossession, past due debt obligations, a recent checking account closure by a bank, past due medical debt, and more.

Apple's support document has a detailed list of explanations for those who were declined, and when you apply for Apple Card, if you are declined by Goldman Sachs (Apple's partner) you'll get a reason why so you can cross reference it here for more information.


The document also explains how credit scores are determined (debt payments, hard credit inquiries, debt level, credit age, open loans, and more), and it details how customers can get a free credit score copy and dispute errors with TransUnion if mistakenly declined for a card. Apple recommends customers check for common errors that can be included in a credit report if there's an issue.

For customers who were declined because their identity could not be verified, Apple offers several recommendations such as verifying that application info is accurate and making sure ID scans (when requested) are clear and include an ID that's not expired and with a last name that matches the application.

When requesting an Apple Card, Goldman Sachs does a soft credit check that does not impact your credit score. Being declined or declining Apple's offer will not require a hard inquiry, which is only done when you actually accept the Apple Card.

Apple says that credit limit is determined by income and minimum payment amounts associated with existing debt, which is used to assess ability to pay.

Right now, Apple Card is limited to customers who have received an invite from Apple, but Apple appears to be sending out quite a lot of invitations to those who have signed up to be notified about Apple Card on the Apple Card website. A wide release for Apple Card could come in the next few weeks.

For more on how Apple Card works and what you can expect, make sure to check out our detailed Apple Card guide.

Article Link: Apple Details Why Some Apple Card Applicants Might Get Declined
 

BornAgainMac

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I thought the people that have the money to purchase that gold Apple Watch or that $1,000 Mac Pro monitor stand would be accepted to have this card. I didn't think this was a card for your average person.
 
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RevTEG

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Id hardly call them approving people in the 600s the rich people
Wait, I know a few wealthy people that don’t have a great credit. They pay cash for everything and have no debt. Credit scores go down when you have no debt and no revolving payments. But I do agree with you that the Apple Card isn’t just for the rich. End of the day the rich don’t need an Apple Card.
 

MacClueless

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Jun 21, 2006
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As I indicated in another thread, I was declined for a bunch of reasons that don't apply to me, then I was invited again the next day.

There's of course no appeal process or way to report bugs so I'll just wait.
 

Jefe's MacAir

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You don't need to be rich to obtain an A+ credit score. It also would behoove you to obtain an A+ credit score as it dictates how much you'll pay interest when borrowing money like a mortgage. It also can determine how much you pay for insurance, employers often check it, landlords always check it, etc. In the long run, you'll save thousands upon thousands just for maintaining a positive credit history.
 

Sootan

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I applied, was approved, have used it, and expect my physical card tomorrow via UPS.

As to all the negativity surrounding this...IF you have an issue with using credit, DON'T get it. Pay the balance monthly and guess what? NO interest. It's so simple it's brilliant. It ISN"T just for "rich people". I have a 701 FICO and was approved with an $8.500 line and 17.99% interest which is irrelevant because I don't carry balances. So I'm not rich and don't have a stellar FICO. Further, there are myriad reports of people with FICO scores of less than 660 getting approved, so give up that line of argument. It just isn't true.

Lastly, this is a BRILLIANT move by Apple because it forces users to setup Apple Pay which requires them to have an iDevice and KEEP an iDevice to be able to manage the account. Very smart in the context of business practice.

Before you flame me, please note that I didn't say I like the practice, just that it's smart on Apple's part. At some point Apple's going to need to make some of these services cross-platform compliant if only because the market demands it. And hopefully sooner than later.
 

kumar714

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Jun 9, 2013
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Yeah, well, first, I don’t think I would qualify the Apple Card as being ‘innovative’ (Pretty sure Apple wouldn’t classify it as innovative either given it’s not a ‘core’ product).

Second, you’re on an Apple related website, it’s a new feature/product from them, so naturally there’s going to be news on it. You can always choose to ignore the article. There are those who have received/applied for an Apple Card that _want_ more details on others experiences, thoughts, etc.
initially i thought i wouldn't qualify too, given i have BK and low score but they approved me for $8,000
 

MacClueless

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Lastly, this is a BRILLIANT move by Apple because it forces users to setup Apple Pay which requires them to have an iDevice and KEEP an iDevice to be able to manage the account. Very smart in the context of business practice.
I think they should change that part. Requiring the device to apply, OK, but if you lose or sell your phone you should still be able to manage your account.
 

jehrler

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Jun 23, 2003
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I applied, was approved, have used it, and expect my physical card tomorrow via UPS.

As to all the negativity surrounding this...IF you have an issue with using credit, DON'T get it. Pay the balance monthly and guess what? NO interest. It's so simple it's brilliant. It ISN"T just for "rich people". I have a 701 FICO and was approved with an $8.500 line and 17.99% interest which is irrelevant because I don't carry balances. So I'm not rich and don't have a stellar FICO. Further, there are myriad reports of people with FICO scores of less than 660 getting approved, so give up that line of argument. It just isn't true.

Lastly, this is a BRILLIANT move by Apple because it forces users to setup Apple Pay which requires them to have an iDevice and KEEP an iDevice to be able to manage the account. Very smart in the context of business practice.

Before you flame me, please note that I didn't say I like the practice, just that it's smart on Apple's part. At some point Apple's going to need to make some of these services cross-platform compliant if only because the market demands it. And hopefully sooner than later.
Any idea what credit agency they look to for the hard check? After the Eqifiasco I locked all my reports at the big three but will want to open up the one GS/Apple are using for a one time use when I apply.
 
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DCJ001

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Not if you pay it off every month. And rewards can be great. My mileage points has allowed me to travel the world or get upgraded to first class every time I buy a economy ticket.

Use an Apple card to buy a Mac Pro and the new monitor, say $10K, pay the bill (not interest) and Apple will give you $300 in cash that night for example.
Or you can use the Apple card to buy a $2000 iMac, get $60 cash back, and save more than $8000 ( when compared to buying the Mac Pro with the stand)!
 
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