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Former EPA chief Lisa Jackson, hired earlier this year to head up Apple's environmental efforts, told a sustainability conference that she plans to get Apple to use energy more efficiently and with cleaner power in the company's data centers and other buildings.

According to GigaOm, Jackson said "Tim Cook didn't hire Lisa Jackson to be quiet and keep the status quo. We understand our responsibility and we do care."
Jackson talked about the challenges of pushing and developing sustainability projects within Apple. One of them is the challenge of collecting solid data and being able to measure projects and their success rates. This includes Apple's method to calculate the energy use and carbon footprint of its operation and products, the manufacturing of its devices and the supply chain and customers' use of the products. Jackson pointed to the life cycle analysis that Steve Jobs publicized back in 2009 in an effort to change the company's image, as an example of Apple's attention to creating sustainability metrics and data.
GigaOm says Jackson's team currently counts 17 people and she is responsible for recruiting more environmentally conscious employees from within the company to help with Apple's sustainability projects, including getting feedback on how to cut wasteful energy use.

apple_100_renewable.jpg
On a related note, DataCenterKnowledge writes about Apple continuing to grow its new Prineville, Oregon data center, constructing a new power substation to go with new buildings going in. Apple's new data center is close to a new center from Facebook.

Earlier this year, Apple said its data centers were running on 100 percent renewable energy -- solar, wind, hydro, and geothermal power -- while the company's corporate facilities are running on 75 percent renewable, up from 35 percent two years ago.

Article Link: Apple Environmental Chief Lisa Jackson Driving Sustainability Efforts
 

3282868

macrumors 603
Jan 8, 2009
5,281
0
I hope Apple doesn't move further away from sustainable and recyclable materials in their products as is the case with the "new" polycarbonate iPhone 5c. I'm very passionate and active in environmental matters, and even more so with regards to the vastly changing technological world and its impact regarding e-waste. I truly want to make the world a better place in this regard, so for those who have read my posts when an environmental thread is front page news, forgive my "broken record". I truly mean only to help inform others in order for us, the "tech savvy", and for consumers, to make an impact by voting with our dollars as our buying power is the one factor that will get the necessary attention for companies to make the right choices in materials used and production waste.

Every year, Americans throw away enough paper and plastic cups, forks, and spoons to circle the equator 300 times (http://www.cleanair.org/Waste/wasteFacts.html). Plastic produces more waste from recycling and general consumer discard. Recycling produces more pollutants, including chemical stews when breaking down different products.

Recycling is not cost-efficient and annually results in a net loss. It costs $50-60 to landfill a ton versus $150+/- to recycle. Only the recycling of aluminum really makes any money. Reclaiming metals is feasible and fairly easy, whereas plastics and paper are expensive, wasteful and overly difficult. The biggest disadvantage to recycling is that it gives the consuming public a false sense of 'security'; a sense that they're doing something to benefit the environment. recycling can be bad for the environment. In fact, except for materials like metal and some glass, recycling is almost always bad for the environment. One of the best places to start is with a report from Perc.org, called the Eight Great Myths of Recycling. "One argument made for recycling notes that we live on a finite planet. With a growing population, we must, it seems, run out of resources."

E-waste is a major issue, especially with plastics. There are 2 plastic islands the size of Texas, one in the Pacific Ocean - the "Great Pacific garbage patch"and one in the Indian Ocean and more being discovered almost monthly. Newly Discovered 'Plastic Island' Shows Global Epidemic Worsening

The patch is characterized by exceptionally high concentrations of pelagic plastics, chemical sludge and other debris that have been trapped by the currents of the North Pacific Gyre. Despite its size and density, the patch is not visible from satellite photography, since it consists primarily of suspended particulates in the upper water column. Since plastics break down to even smaller polymers, concentrations of submerged particles are not visible from space, nor do they appear as a continuous debris field.

Charles Moore - TED discussion on plastic - 7 minutes but alarming facts on plastic toxicity and huge annual increases in waste.

As Japan has serious garbage issues, a Japanese scientist invented a machine that breaks any plastic down into oil! I've mentioned the on MacRumors before as it is an issue the tech industry needs to take into serious consideration. This device is no larger than a microwave and uses less energy than a coffee maker. Read and watch the short 5 min video, if for nothing else than the tech as it's amazing. Hoping quick mainstream adoption lowers the $10k price tag quickly enough for residential use and can make up for its price by reusing the oil. Used in large industrial recycling centers would be amazing!

Plastic to oil fantastic


Aluminum is currently the best material for mass production in products, especially tech due to e-waste. Bauxite being the most common aluminum ore. Refinement uses much less energy to produce, and is improving with recent advancements, especially compared to the Hall-Héoult Process (the major industrial process aluminum extraction). Aluminum is theoretically 100% recyclable without any loss of its natural qualities and requires only 5% of the energy used to produce aluminum from ore, though a significant part (up to 15% of the input material) is lost as dross (ash-like oxide). Recycled aluminum is known as secondary aluminum, but maintains the same physical properties as primary aluminum. Secondary aluminum is produced in a wide range of formats and is employed in 80% of alloy injections. The process produces aluminum billets, together with a highly complex waste material, which can be reused as a filler in asphalt and concrete.

If you got this far, thank you. Collectively we can make a difference in plastic usage by "voting with our dollars". We don't need more waste; plastic in tech produces much more waste (and chemical waste from wires, displays, etc) than other naturally occurring metals and smelting. It's great Apple is trying to produce a lower cost iPhone, however plastic shouldn't be much cheaper than smelting aluminum, especially as Apple has dedicated plants for product shells using green energy.
 

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ThunderSkunk

macrumors 68040
Dec 31, 2007
3,083
2,708
Milwaukee Area
Good.

Now do what governments can't, and build a Liquid Fluoride Thorium Reactor. License off the tech and turn the world upside down.
 
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2457282

Suspended
Dec 6, 2012
3,327
3,014
I am not aware of any other company (i suppose there are others out there) that has mad such a significant effort in addressing environmental responsibility the way Apple has. I do not know much about Lisa, but I applaud any and all efforts that moves the company in the direction of green
 
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ghettochris

macrumors 6502a
Feb 19, 2008
774
0
Jackson said "Tim Cook didn't hire Lisa Jackson to be quiet and keep the status quo. We understand our responsibility and we do care."

Ghettochris always finds it amusing when people talk about themselves in the third person.
 
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Squilly

macrumors 68020
Nov 17, 2012
2,260
4
PA
That's very impressive. Kudos to the pledge of continuing green energy
 
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dotheDVDeed

macrumors member
Jul 13, 2007
74
9
pffft... Green? Design an all-in-one desktop computer I can replace the motherboard/cpu instead of having the computer being tossed in the dump.

At least let me upgrade the RAM and the SSD/HD.
 
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Preclaro_tipo

macrumors regular
Dec 6, 2003
174
182
West Lafayette, IN
Jackson the best, says Jackson

Jackson knows Jackson will do a good job, and exceed all requirement imposed by Jackson. Jackson isn't here to build good will with current (and future EPA) employees by assuring them that favorable treatment to Apple while under the employ of the EPA could lead to a lucrative job at Apple in the future, no sir. Says Jackson.
 
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xSinghx

Suspended
Oct 2, 2012
308
87
I am not aware of any other company (i suppose there are others out there) that has mad such a significant effort in addressing environmental responsibility the way Apple has. I do not know much about Lisa, but I applaud any and all efforts that moves the company in the direction of green

Tesla, Toyota
 
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nick42983

macrumors 6502
May 18, 2009
445
346
California
Exactly, as long as she's fighting the "green" fight, she can do no wrong. Terrible that companies like Apple have to hire these androgynous bureaucrats to cover their a$$ from this administration.

If Apple really wanted to make a difference in the environment, they'd throw their weight behind something like the TerraPower nuclear reactor, which Bill Gates is promoting. http://articles.economictimes.indiatimes.com/2013-09-25/news/42394809_1_uranium-nuclear-reactor-bill-gates


Apple's initiatives, spearheaded by Lisa Jackson, are window dressing to appease Green Peace, the Sierra Club and other extremist, environmental organizations from blackmailing them with false data: http://www.datacenterknowledge.com/archives/2012/04/17/apple-greenpeaces-cloud-math-is-busted/


 
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autrefois

macrumors 65816
Oct 22, 2003
1,396
1,196
Somewhere in the USA
pffft... Green? Design an all-in-one desktop computer I can replace the motherboard/cpu instead of having the computer being tossed in the dump.

At least let me upgrade the RAM and the SSD/HD.

That's crazy talk — it might add a millimeter or two to the width of the computer, and we can't have that!

Maybe they could develop environmentally-friendly glue instead.
 
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warnergt

macrumors member
Jan 20, 2006
57
30
Tim Cook must owe Barack Obama a favor. Why else would he hire a law-breaking, scandal-ridden bureaucrat? Lisa Jackson did her best to shut down the U.S. economy and kill U.S. jobs while ignoring the law and FOIA requests and hiding her communications with illegal personal email accounts using fake IDs.

She deserves a foot up her azz; not a job at Apple.
 
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3282868

macrumors 603
Jan 8, 2009
5,281
0
Tim Cook must owe Barack Obama a favor. Why else would he hire a law-breaking, scandal-ridden bureaucrat? Lisa Jackson did her best to shut down the U.S. economy and kill U.S. jobs while ignoring the law and FOIA requests and hiding her communications with illegal personal email accounts using fake IDs.

She deserves a foot up her azz; not a job at Apple.


Loaded bias "news", The Washington Post is far from "fair and balanced".

In all, I'm glad she never backed down from the corporate lobbyists and b.s. to stand up for her position: keeping corporate bureaucracies from further damaging our planet. The Keystone Pipeline will only guarantee 35 longterm jobs, that's it. All the rhetoric that it's stifling employment is non-sense as it will not benefit anyone other than the oil companies pushing for it.

Point of fact, North America already receives most of its oil from Canada and Latin America.

Where Does America Get Oil? You May Be Surprised

- Source NPR

Since the Arab oil embargoes of the 1960s and 70s, it's been conventional wisdom to talk about American dependence on oil from the Persian Gulf. But the global oil market has changed dramatically since then.

Today, the U.S. actually gets most of its imported oil from Canada and Latin America.

And many Americans might be surprised to learn that the U.S. now imports roughly the same amount of oil from Africa as it does from the Persian Gulf. African imports were a bit higher in 2010, while Persian Gulf oil accounted for a bit more last year.

America is one of the world's largest oil producers, and close to 40 percent of U.S. oil needs are met at home. Most of the imports currently come from five countries: Canada, Saudi Arabia, Mexico, Venezuela and Nigeria.

Canada has been pushing the Keystone Pipeline the hardest to the kickbacks promised by the oil and gas industry.

Canada Threatens U.S. with Oil Trains if Keystone XL Not Built

On 6 July, a Montreal, Maine & Atlantic train carrying 72 tank cars filled with oil exploded after its brakes apparently failed, sending it rolling into the small Quebec town of Lac-Megantic, where it derailed and then exploded. In the conflagration that followed, an estimated 47 people were killed.

Whether Canadians like it or not, the use of such trains has soared in recent years. The Railway Association of Canada reports that as recently as four years ago Canadian railways moved just 500 carloads of crude oil, but that number has now soared to about 140,000 carloads annually.

Now, in a breathtaking display of chutzpah, the Canadian ambassador to the U.S. is warning President Obama if he does not approve the controversial Keystone XL pipeline, then he can expect similar oil trains and even trucks to enter the U.S. Ambassador Gary Doer said, “His choice is to have it come down by a pipeline that he approves, or without his approval, it comes down on trains. That’s just the raw common sense of this thing, and we’ve been saying it for two years and we’ve been proven correct. At the end of the day, it’s trains or pipelines.”

The Shaheen-Portman Energy Savings and Industrial Competitiveness Act was a broadly supported, bipartisan bill that would reduce consumers’ energy costs by $4 billion and create 80,000 jobs. Yet a small group of Senators working on behalf of Big Oil are attempting to hijack the bill and turn it into an effort to promote the highly polluting Keystone XL pipeline.

The important matter is realizing there are already feasible, clean, renewable alternatives to oil and gas that are being used in the states and other nations and can and will drive a new economy based on green energy. A friend who moved to Israel for marketing as it is the greenest nation on the planet, followed by Spain, has taught me a lot on the tech that's already in use and hopefully making its way to mainstream.

Hydrogen fuel cell vehicles are currently running in NY for our military thanks to then Sen. Clinton who brokered contracts for GM to build our Army hydrogen vehicles. Toyota, Honda and Nissan have hydrogen fueled vehicles operating in California and Florida. The extraction of hydrogen from water is a simple process and with fueling stations using state of the art solar paneling other power sources aren't taxed as is the case with electric vehicles (a misnomer that they are "clean" as the power source is merely switched). With water vapor/clean water after the chemical reaction of reuniting hydrogen with oxygen in the atmosphere, some of the vehicles collect the fresh water for reuse. These vehicles are no more dangerous if less so than gasoline, if they were, I highly doubt our Army and Toyota, Honda, et all would have them on our roads.

Blaming Ms. Jackson for not giving into the corruption is ludicrous. Blame should fall squarely on the shoulders of the oil and gas industry for stifling advancements towards a sustainable, green economy. More jobs would be created during the course of transitioning away from oil and gas towards renewable and clean energy and the tech needed to sustain such. Ms. Jackson's function was to protect our environment, she stood up against the billion dollar industry that [unfairly] slandered her reputation. I could not imagine the pressure she must have endured.

People need to adapt, push our elected officials further on this matter, educate themselves on the facts regarding environmental policy, green technology and the advancements that are being stifled through rhetoric and propaganda, and become more active. Long term, we will all benefit and at some point we must change as the resources will not last forever while our population is skyrocketing. The bigger picture is crucial.
 
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toadc69

macrumors newbie
Jul 17, 2012
13
1
Twin Peaks
Round of applause....

I hope Apple doesn't move further away from sustainable and recyclable materials in their products as is the case with the "new" polycarbonate iPhone 5c. .

If the Macbook line (MBPr & Air specifically) are any indication, I'd be inclined towards NOT holding my breath waiting for Apple to give sustainabilty and recyclable materials a seat at their product manufacturing table.

To quote Kyle Wiens, Unfixable Computers Are Leading Humanity Down a Perilous Path/

I realize Apple has done more than most and I admit to being part of the problem (with my Massive Samsung LCD TV, Macbook Pro, iPhones, etc)

At the same time, spending time, $$$, and energy on building devices with their display fused to the glass, and RAM soldered to the logic board — making future memory upgrades impossible, or gluing the battery to the case, proprietary cables etc. This energy could arguably be better spent on innovation and sustainability and other forward thinking principles.

I'm happy to hear that Apple has an executive department 17 strong and growing. But detect a hint of green-washy odor to this latest announcement, in light of some of the above mentioned product releases the past 4 years.
 
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Nightarchaon

macrumors 65816
Sep 1, 2010
1,393
29
Hydrogen isn't "clean" unless its being created by Solar or Wind power, directly on site. on site, with no shipping of either the water to be split or the hydrogen from the plant where its being split from water. If they are having it trucked in then thats probably worse than just being hooked up to the grid and sucking down power with everyone else.

Its like Prius cars, the damn battery has been around the world so many times that the overall carbon foot print of the car before you even drive it is already higher than a Hummer.
 
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pubwvj

macrumors 68000
Oct 1, 2004
1,896
200
Mountains of Vermont
Bah humbug. This is all lip service. If Apple is going to do sustainability and environmentally friendly they would do real legacy support for old hardware and software. Keeping good old equipment useable by supporting it means resources aren't wasted building new equipment. It is insane that Apple fails to support the original iPhone and such, the PowerBooks, etc. Five years is a blink in time. There is no good reason for Apple to stop supporting older software either.
 
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meistervu

macrumors 65816
Jul 24, 2008
1,027
27
Bah humbug. This is all lip service. If Apple is going to do sustainability and environmentally friendly they would do real legacy support for old hardware and software. Keeping good old equipment useable by supporting it means resources aren't wasted building new equipment. It is insane that Apple fails to support the original iPhone and such, the PowerBooks, etc. Five years is a blink in time. There is no good reason for Apple to stop supporting older software either.

So, what happens when these old computer is no longer supported?

I have a 2006 Mac Pro. Last time I checked (yesterday), it worked as well as when it was new. I was able to browse the web, ran Aperture and managed my photo library. I don't use it as much because I get by with a laptop nowadays which uses a lot less energy.

I know a school that still uses the old iMacs, the candy color ones that use CRT. Those must be a decade old. I think most people keep their Macs a lot longer than their PCs, so upgradable or not, in practice Macs are more environmentally friendly.
 
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wikiverse

macrumors 6502a
Sep 13, 2012
569
407
Bah humbug. This is all lip service. If Apple is going to do sustainability and environmentally friendly they would do real legacy support for old hardware and software. Keeping good old equipment useable by supporting it means resources aren't wasted building new equipment. It is insane that Apple fails to support the original iPhone and such, the PowerBooks, etc. Five years is a blink in time. There is no good reason for Apple to stop supporting older software either.

This!

1) Reduce,
2) Reuse...

Allowing basic components (hard drives, RAM, batteries) to be upgraded over time will significantly reduce the amount of e-waste.
 
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coolfactor

macrumors 601
Jul 29, 2002
4,957
5,327
Vancouver, BC
Bah humbug. This is all lip service. If Apple is going to do sustainability and environmentally friendly they would do real legacy support for old hardware and software. Keeping good old equipment useable by supporting it means resources aren't wasted building new equipment. It is insane that Apple fails to support the original iPhone and such, the PowerBooks, etc. Five years is a blink in time. There is no good reason for Apple to stop supporting older software either.

Apple does an excellent job at supporting legacy products. My primary laptop is a 2007 MacBook Pro and it will run Mavericks. I'll probably be able to get 2 or 3 more years out of this machine, so that's 10 years on one laptop with minimal maintenance. I have a client using my older G5 PowerMac to run their retail shop. My iPhone 4 is running iOS 7 just fine.

To think that Apple would invest into supporting the original iPhone, with its limited RAM, processing power and storage, is insane. Progress goes forward, it doesn't hold onto the past. Besides, it's the industry as a whole (3rd-party developers) that are driving the spec needs up, not necessarily Apple.

You wouldn't have the great technology that you have today if they didn't push forward. Count your blessings, and find a way to go with the flow with minimal environmental impact. The power is in each of us.
 
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3282868

macrumors 603
Jan 8, 2009
5,281
0
Hydrogen isn't "clean" unless its being created by Solar or Wind power, directly on site. on site, with no shipping of either the water to be split or the hydrogen from the plant where its being split from water. If they are having it trucked in then thats probably worse than just being hooked up to the grid and sucking down power with everyone else.

Its like Prius cars, the damn battery has been around the world so many times that the overall carbon foot print of the car before you even drive it is already higher than a Hummer.

Exactly:

Hydrogen fuel cell vehicles are currently running in NY for our military thanks to then Sen. Clinton who brokered contracts for GM to build our Army hydrogen vehicles. Toyota, Honda and Nissan have hydrogen fueled vehicles operating in California and Florida. The extraction of hydrogen from water is a simple process and with fueling stations using state of the art solar paneling other power sources aren't taxed as is the case with electric vehicles (a misnomer that they are "clean" as the power source is merely switched). With water vapor/clean water after the chemical reaction of reuniting hydrogen with oxygen in the atmosphere, some of the vehicles collect the fresh water for reuse. As well, these vehicles are no more dangerous if less so than the gasoline vehicles currently running for well over a century. If they weren't, I highly doubt our Army and Toyota, Honda, et all would allow them to operate on our roadways.

It is "clean" and the fueling stations extracting hydrogen are self reliant, using solar and other "green" sources of energy to keep the burden off of power grids/plants. I learned quite a bit from my years in Los Angeles, where families have been "testing" hydrogen fuel cell vehicles for quite a while.
 
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phoenixsan

macrumors 65816
Oct 19, 2012
1,342
2
That is commendable......

a company putting the resources and the commitment to do things right for the enviroment....Way to go, Apple.....:D


:):apple:
 
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macs4nw

macrumors 601
…..I'm very passionate and active in environmental matters, and even more so with regards to the vastly changing technological world and its impact regarding e-waste. I truly want to make the world a better place in this regard, so for those who have read my posts when an environmental thread is front page news, forgive my "broken record". I truly mean only to help inform others in order for us, the "tech savvy", and for consumers, to make an impact by voting with our dollars as our buying power is the one factor that will get the necessary attention for companies to make the right choices in materials used and production waste…..

…..Apologies, this is a topic of which I am very informed on and passionate. It upsets and saddens me at the same time how willing some are to take the information they are fed at face value without question. When we stop asking questions and assume what we're told is fact, we have already lost. Time is running out, we can't afford to lose more. This is the only place we have to call home, if we destroy it, it will live on, we will not…..

No need to apologize, those who don't want to read what you have to say, can skip over it. I read your posts, and the links they provided in their entirety, and found them eye-opening. It's refreshing to read the opinion of others, especially if those posters, such as yourself, are clearly passionate about subjects as crucial as the preservation of our planet. If more people would spread the word, and practiced what they preach, we might have a fighting chance.

Even though large corporations have an ethical duty to lead the way with environmental stewardship and responsibility, we all can, and should, do our part, no matter how seemingly small or insignificant, to reduce our impact on this beautiful and amazing 'corner' of the universe we call home.
 
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