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Apple today announced it has expanded its Self Service Repair program to cover the iPhone 15 lineup and Mac models powered by M2 chips, including the 14- and 16-inch MacBook Pro, the 15-inch MacBook Air, Mac mini, Mac Pro, and Mac Studio.

Apple-Self-Service-Repair-Program-iPhone.jpeg

Apple also said that Self Service Repair is now available for Apple users in 24 additional European countries, including Croatia, Denmark, Greece, Netherlands, Portugal, and Switzerland. With this latest expansion, Self Service Repair now supports 35 Apple products in 33 countries and 24 languages.

Additionally, Apple Diagnostics for Self Service Repair is available today in the U.S. for iPhones and Macs, with availability in Europe to come next year. Intended for users with the knowledge and expertise to repair Apple devices, Apple Diagnostics troubleshooting sessions gives customers the same ability as Apple Authorized Service Providers and Independent Repair Providers to test devices for optimal part functionality and performance, as well as identify which parts may need repair.

Launched in 2022, Apple's Self Service Repair program is designed to allow Apple device owners to do their own repairs in their homes using Apple parts, repair manuals, and tools.

To conduct a repair, customers first need to review the repair manual for their product and the specific repair on Apple's support website. After, they'll be able to order the required parts and tools from the Self Service Repair Store and begin the repair.

The program is part of Apple's efforts to "further expand access to repairs," according to the company. That said, Apple cautions that the "vast majority" of customers should still visit a professional repair provider, such as an Apple Store, to ensure their devices are repaired safely and reliably.

Article Link: Apple Expands Self Service Repair in Europe, Now Covers iPhone 15 and M2 Macs
 
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AlmightyKang

macrumors 6502
Nov 20, 2023
428
1,274
Just checked prices. Quite reasonable as well. i expect to have to replace the cooler on my M2 mini at some point and it's under £16.
 
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Populus

macrumors 601
Aug 24, 2012
4,604
6,639
Spain, Europe
I wonder on what other countries the program will be available… I’ve read the original press note, and it only cites the same countries as MR does, so…
 

AlmightyKang

macrumors 6502
Nov 20, 2023
428
1,274
Cant wait to replace the ssd myself...

<cough>frame.work</cough>

I don't get this perspective really any more. We have over 1000 workstations in the office with SSDs in and we have never had to replace a single SSD. I have SSDs that are nearly 10 years old now and work fine. The only time I've had to replace an SSD was the very very high end enterprise Hitachi ones which had crazy IOPS 24/7/365 for years in really big database servers. There will be edge cases but that's what warranties are for.

If you run out of space, delete some crap or buy the right amount to start with. I've got less than 100Gb of stuff and have been on Earth for at least 5 decades...
 

theluggage

macrumors 604
Jul 29, 2011
7,486
7,335
<cough>frame.work</cough>

The framework stuff looks like a great bit of design, but I'm not quite sure of the "use case". I think the only time I upgraded a laptop was because:
  1. I initially scrimped and got a 4GB model because Apple (as always) wanted £silly for 8GB.
  2. A few years after purchase, decent-sized SSDs suddenly became affordable (true for all platforms) - which was probably the most significant performance boost that decade.
...otherwise, after 3-5 years use, newer laptops are better in so many respects - CPU, Graphics, Display, I/O tech, that the only motivation for upgrading rather than replacing is "saving the planet" (Making do without the newest shiny for a couple of years probably saves more penguins and I'd rather re-purpose/donate the old computer as a working system than chuck half of it in the bin and upgrade). Even when I've built completely modular PC towers, after a few years bringing them "up to spec" would have meant replacing virtually everything apart from maybe the case.

The main reason for aftermarket upgrades on Macs is Apple's pricing strategy that pushes people to scrimp on RAM and SSD - If I were buying a PC laptop, I'd just get plenty of RAM and SSD on day one. The Framework offers a few other interesting options: the I/O port modules (but ultimately, they're functionally just USB-C dongles - you won't be adding next-generation I/O that way, esp. without Thunderbolt) and now upgradeable GPUs (but reliant on new GPUs being released in Framework format).

Still, Framework is a cool design and, if I were buying a PC laptop, I might be tempted by that alone, I'm just not sure of the practicality.
 

AlmightyKang

macrumors 6502
Nov 20, 2023
428
1,274
Still, Framework is a cool design and, if I were buying a PC laptop, I might be tempted by that alone, I'm just not sure of the practicality.

I have to run a PC laptop for some workloads which don't work on macOS and I looked at the Framework ones but the thing doesn't make financial sense. If you know where to look, you can get a mid-range Lenovo T-series for half the configured price of the equivalent Framework, use it for a couple of years, buy another one and pass the old one down to the kids and be up money in comparison. Plus if you've seen a T-series ThinkPad, which is made of superior materials to the Framework, after 4-5 years you'll know the Framework chassis is going to have longevity issues way before that.
 

Aoligei

macrumors 6502a
Jul 16, 2020
892
968
Interested to see what Rossmann and Hugh Jeffries have to say about this. I say it’s a good thing.

Apple self- repair program is just Apple’s way combating negative press on its anti-repair practices.

Let’s talk when Apple give up on serializing parts (it is ridiculous to have FaceID disabled when screen replacement is done), allowing SSD replacements and making parts widely available with no string attached (such as making parts available on iFixit, like Google and Motorola is doing).
 

jarman92

macrumors 65816
Nov 13, 2014
1,476
4,575
Any news on when Apple will make good on their promise to release standalone batteries for MacBooks? $500+ to replace 3/4 of your computer just for a new battery is insane.
 

progx

macrumors 6502a
Oct 3, 2003
763
817
Pennsylvania
Interested to see what Rossmann and Hugh Jeffries have to say about this. I say it’s a good thing.
Rossmann would likely say it isn't perfect, but it's a start. Can't speak for Jeffries.

Just glad to see Right to Repair getting some traction.
 

MauiPa

macrumors 68040
Apr 18, 2018
3,429
5,080
Then: "I Want to do self-repair"
Now: "Dang, I don't have the tools or the experience to do this"

Just saying. Ok, right to repair is legit, everyone would agree with that. But the efforts to make devices lighter, more secure, and water resistant also make them harder to disassemble.

Obviously, there is an issue with integrating RAM on the SOC (other than not being upgradeable, is it good (faster, more energy efficient) or bad (not upgradeable, but then neither was Low Power Ram which had to be soldered)). It would be nice of course to be able to add SSD capacity, or alternately if Apple would lower price of upgrade options (I don't think anyone thinks Apple's prices are reasonable).
 

MauiPa

macrumors 68040
Apr 18, 2018
3,429
5,080
Apple self- repair program is just Apple’s way combating negative press on its anti-repair practices.

Let’s talk when Apple give up on serializing parts (it is ridiculous to have FaceID disabled when screen replacement is done), allowing SSD replacements and making parts widely available with no string attached (such as making parts available on iFixit, like Google and Motorola is doing).
Is it reasonable to be able to "repair" a phone and defeat all of the protection software? Remember when all you had to do to defeat Windows security was to remove the hard drive and pop it in another computer?
 

Aoligei

macrumors 6502a
Jul 16, 2020
892
968
Is it reasonable to be able to "repair" a phone and defeat all of the protection software? Remember when all you had to do to defeat Windows security was to remove the hard drive and pop it in another computer?

Please elaborate how changing batteries or screens or back camera is defeating a the protection software?
 
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Hank001

macrumors regular
Mar 26, 2023
177
216
I don't get this perspective really any more. We have over 1000 workstations in the office with SSDs in and we have never had to replace a single SSD. I have SSDs that are nearly 10 years old now and work fine. The only time I've had to replace an SSD was the very very high end enterprise Hitachi ones which had crazy IOPS 24/7/365 for years in really big database servers. There will be edge cases but that's what warranties are for.

If you run out of space, delete some crap or buy the right amount to start with. I've got less than 100Gb of stuff and have been on Earth for at least 5 decades...

If you're on earth for 5 decades you'd know that 100Gb equals 12,5GB...which really isn't that much storage at all.

 

svish

macrumors G3
Nov 25, 2017
9,509
25,273
Glad to hear that it is expanding. Still waiting for it to be available in my region. But for most it will be better to take it to an Apple store for repair
 
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