Apple Forces Recyclers to Shred All iPhones and MacBooks

tubeexperience

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Documents obtained by Motherboard: "No reuse. No parts harvesting. No resale."

Apple released its Environmental Responsibility Report Wednesday, an annual grandstanding effort that the company uses to position itself as a progressive, environmentally friendly company. Behind the scenes, though, the company undermines attempts to prolong the lifespan of its products.

Apple's new moonshot plan is to make iPhones and computers entirely out of recycled materials by putting pressure on the recycling industry to innovate. But documents obtained by Motherboard using Freedom of Information requests show that Apple's current practices prevent recyclers from doing the most environmentally friendly thing they could do: Salvage phones and computers from the scrap heap.

Apple rejects current industry best practices by forcing the recyclers it works with to shred iPhones and MacBooks so they cannot be repaired or reused—instead, they are turned into tiny shards of metal and glass.

Materials are manually and mechanically disassembled and shredded into commodity-sized fractions of metals, plastics, and glass," John Yeider, Apple's recycling program manager, wrote under a heading called "Takeback Program Report" in a 2013 report to Michigan Department of Environmental Quality. "All hard drives are shredded in confetti-sized pieces. The pieces are then sorted into commodities grade materials. After sorting, the materials are sold and used for production stock in new products. No reuse. No parts harvesting. No resale."



Apple is fundamentally a manufacturer, not a recycling company. While its two Liam "recycling robots" looks cool in an ad, they're only capable of disassembling a total of 2.4 million phones per year; Apple sold 215.3 million iPhones in 2016. Most iPhones simply aren't making it back to Apple, and Apple doesn't have the capacity to recycle these phones.

But the company is responsible for recycling thousands of tons of electronics per year thanks to a series of state-level "manufacturer responsibility" laws that require electronics companies to recycle e-waste each year based on their overall sales in that state. To learn more about its recycling practices, I have spent the last year collecting Apple's state recycling reports using Freedom of Information laws around the country.

[...]
https://motherboard.vice.com/en_us/article/apple-recycling-iphones-macbooks

 

maflynn

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So you're complaining that Apple is recycling o_O

I've long stopped listening to Louis Rossmann as he seems to go out of his way to criticize Apple and has an axe to grind against them, just for the sake of getting hits on his YT channel.
 
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NT1440

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I've seen this stupid article come up everywhere since Apple announced their initiative to go mining free.

Not allowing for a resale market of parts is not the same thing as not recycling.
 
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tubeexperience

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So you're complaining that Apple is recycling o_O

I've long stopped listening to Louis Rossmann as he seems to go out of his way to criticize and apple and has an axe to grind against them, just for the sake of getting hits on his YT channel.
No, I am complaining that Apple refuses to let parts that work perfectly fine be reused.

For example, let's suppose that logic board failed (and Louis Rossman didn't buy it).

Why does the display, the SSD, the top case, the bottom case, etc. all needs to be crushed into little pieces?
 

maflynn

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No, I am complaining that Apple refuses to let parts that work perfectly fine be reused.

For example, let's suppose that logic board failed (and Louis Rossman didn't buy it).

Why does the display, the SSD, the top case, the bottom case, etc. all needs to be crushed into little pieces?
Apple is sending these products to the recycler to recycle, not resell. if they failed Apple's own internal repair/refurbishment process and they chose to send the machine to a recycler then they expect that to occur.

If a recycling company has some sort of issue that as thy prefer fixing/reselling the products, then they don't have to do business with apple. At this point Apple is the customer and they are doing what they want with their machines.
[doublepost=1493131056][/doublepost]Another issue is that if they did go and resell these, it could be a support headache for apple as they sent these for recycling, a company "fixes" them and resells the laptop. It fails and that new owner calls apple up to complain and get it fixed. I can see that if apple determines the machine is not good enough to refurbish then it will recycle the parts for reuse.
 
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tubeexperience

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Apple is sending these products to the recycler to recycle, not resell. if they failed Apple's own internal repair/refurbishment process and they chose to send the machine to a recycler then they expect that to occur.

If a recycling company has some sort of issue that as thy prefer fixing/reselling the products, then they don't have to do business with apple. At this point Apple is the customer and they are doing what they want with their machines.
[doublepost=1493131056][/doublepost]Another issue is that if they did go and resell these, it could be a support headache for apple as they sent these for recycling, a company "fixes" them and resells the laptop. It fails and that new owner calls apple up to complain and get it fixed. I can see that if apple determines the machine is not good enough to refurbish then it will recycle the parts for reuse.
You know full well that this is just another battlefront in a war against 3rd party repairs and DIY.
 

NT1440

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You know full well that this is just another battlefront in a war against 3rd party repairs and DIY.
HOW.

Explain to me HOW parts and machines that Apple is expressly shipping out for recycling is damaging repairs and DIY? Are you asserting that Apple should be sending units out for recycling with the expectation that the recycler should be allowed to scavenge parts (and potentially salvage hard drives/ssd's)? That's absurd. You contract for recycling with the explicit demand in the contract that any and all parts will be securely recycled. Anyone in the IT field that has experience in decommissioning units knows this. You don't ship stuff out to be destroyed without guaranteeing that security is first and foremost.

Regardless, recycling from Apple is completely outside the domain of 3rd party repairs. Two entirely different avenues.
 

maflynn

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That's absurd. You contract for recycling with the explicit demand in the contract that any and all parts will be securely recycled.
The company I work for has the same exact relationship. Any computers being sent off for recycling are not being resold, repaired, or dissaembled, but rather shredded (to use the article's terminology).
 

NT1440

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May 18, 2008
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The company I work for has the same exact relationship. Any computers being sent off for recycling are not being resold, repaired, or dissaembled, but rather shredded (to use the article's terminology).
Yup, that's standard practice.

Why this has been circulating on the web recently is beyond me, other than a pathetic response to Apple's laudable (but still not fully explained/fleshed out) future goal of no-mining manufacturing.
 

Zirel

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That Youtuber is the worst, a pure Apple hater that says Apple puts chips that stop working when the warranty runs out, which is obviously fake.

Second, Apple recycles devices that people return them (receiving a monetary compensation) for recycling.

Apple can't fix them because that would be a scam.

Also, recycling is the best for those cases, old computers are bad for the environment because they consume more power to do less, it's not like Apple is throwing away good devices, because nobody gives good devices for Apple to recycle as they have a better second hand value.
[doublepost=1493170714][/doublepost]
Yup, that's standard practice.

Why this has been circulating on the web recently is beyond me, other than a pathetic response to Apple's laudable (but still not fully explained/fleshed out) future goal of no-mining manufacturing.
Some press group is not happy with Apple advertising with the competition.

Simple as that.