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Apple Highlights Photos Shot by iPhone 12 Users: Portraits, Cityscapes, and More

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Apple today shared a gallery of photos shot by customers using the iPhone 12 mini, iPhone 12, iPhone 12 Pro, and iPhone 12 Pro Max, with scenes including cityscapes, landscapes, portraits of people, and more at day and night.

Shot on iPhone 12 Pro Max by "NKCHU" in China (top) and shot on iPhone 12 Pro Max by Rohit Vohra in India (bottom)

iPhone 12 mini and iPhone 12 models have a dual camera system with Ultra Wide and Wide lenses, while iPhone 12 Pro models have an additional Telephoto lens for optical zoom. Apple explains some of the key camera features across the lineup:
iPhone 12 and iPhone 12 mini feature a powerful dual-camera system with an expansive Ultra Wide camera and a new Wide camera with an ƒ/1.6 aperture that provides 27 percent more light for improved photos and videos in low-light environments. Both models also introduce new computational photography features, which include Night mode and faster-performing Deep Fusion on all cameras, for improved photos in any environment. Smart HDR 3 uses machine learning to intelligently adjust the white balance, contrast, texture, and saturation of a photo for remarkably natural-looking images.

The reimagined pro camera system on iPhone 12 Pro and iPhone 12 Pro Max is even more versatile with Ultra Wide, Wide, and Telephoto cameras, and provides even more creative control to users. iPhone 12 Pro Max takes the pro camera experience even further with a 65 mm focal length Telephoto camera for increased flexibility and 5x optical zoom range, as well as an advanced Wide camera boasting a 47 percent larger sensor with 1.7μm pixels for a massive 87 percent improvement in low-light conditions. A LiDAR Scanner also unlocks advanced capabilities for Pro models, including up to 6x faster autofocus in low-light scenes and the introduction of Night mode portraits.
The full gallery of photos can be found on the Apple Newsroom.

Article Link: Apple Highlights Photos Shot by iPhone 12 Users: Portraits, Cityscapes, and More
 
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PinkyMacGodess

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I hope it's better. When I upgraded to the 11 Pro Max, from my 10 Max, taking photos has been one of the most discouraging things of the process. Night photography seems to work pretty well, I captured a deer in my yeard the other night, but so many times the images are blurry. It appears to be snapping the noise, and a counter starts running, and there is another click. I must be missing some basic feature. Is this the 'live photo' feature? Is there a way to turn it off, or a better way to deal with the output? And how does the LIDAR feature work? Sounds interesting...
 
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AirunJae

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Looking back at my pictures from the iPhone 6/6S, they just get better and better through the years. However, when I view the photos on something bigger than a phone screen, you can really tell. My fervent wish is for Apple to partner with someone like FujiFilm to bring the smarts and ease of taking photos on the iPhone to a much larger sensor. Sometimes when taking photos of my kid crawling around with my camera, I wish the process could be as easy as it is on my phone, but with the greater light-gathering/detail/information that comes with a larger sensor. Sigh.
 
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truszko1

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Jan 19, 2021
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I always wondered, mostly because I never had an iPhone... Are "regular" users capable of taking such photos? I'm assuming they aren't just "point and shoot." Are they retouched in Photoshop? Or are the advanced camera settings (iso, exposure, etc) adjusted so that these photos come out so pretty?
 
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PinkyMacGodess

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Looking back at my pictures from the iPhone 6/6S, they just get better and better through the years. However, when I view the photos on something bigger than a phone screen, you can really tell. My fervent wish is for Apple to partner with someone like FujiFilm to bring the smarts and ease of taking photos on the iPhone to a much larger sensor. Sometimes when taking photos of my kid crawling around with my camera, I wish the process could be as easy as it is on my phone, but with the greater light-gathering/detail/information that comes with a larger sensor. Sigh.

Bigger sensor means bigger lenses means thicker device.

But on another idea, I don't know anyone that carries around a separate camera anymore. I've laughingly watched people use iPads as cameras, which is pretty hilarious. Getting images off of a portable camera has always been a PITA, requiring dongles, cables, incantations. It would be cool if Apple enabled AirDrop to be used on portable cameras. When it works, AirDrop just rocks. No dongles, cables, incantations; point and click, so to speak...

The camera companies all seem to have their ways of massaging image data inside their devices. Making images easier to transfer to Apple devices would be fantastic, and then Apple software can 'Appleize' the images. *shrug*
 
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SnakeEater1993

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Sep 1, 2020
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Looking back at my pictures from the iPhone 6/6S, they just get better and better through the years. However, when I view the photos on something bigger than a phone screen, you can really tell. My fervent wish is for Apple to partner with someone like FujiFilm to bring the smarts and ease of taking photos on the iPhone to a much larger sensor. Sometimes when taking photos of my kid crawling around with my camera, I wish the process could be as easy as it is on my phone, but with the greater light-gathering/detail/information that comes with a larger sensor. Sigh.
They still use 12MP sensors that's why you don't see many differences in bigger screens..
 
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PinkyMacGodess

macrumors 603
Mar 7, 2007
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Midwest America.
I always wondered, mostly because I never had an iPhone... Are "regular" users capable of taking such photos? I'm assuming they aren't just "point and shoot." Are they retouched in Photoshop? Or are the advanced camera settings (iso, exposure, etc) adjusted so that these photos come out so pretty?

I would expect it to be the later. Sure, a 'mere mortal' can do incredible things, but so much of that process is knowing how to setup the tools used to do incredible things. The guy that did most of the cabinetry in my house (20 years ago) had a lot of the same power tools I did. I felt better about buying those tools, and could do 'average things' with them, but he was an artist. He took those tools, and made some incredible cabinets. He knew how to really use those tools. He asked me why I didn't do the cabinets. Well, I wanted them square, even, solid, not a Picasso experience...:oops:😆:cool:Not trying to trash my woodworking skills, but I recognize my limits.

I'm sure Apple engineers setup the devices for optimum image creation. We mere mortals at least have a chance...
 
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AirunJae

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Apr 14, 2008
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Bigger sensor means bigger lenses means thicker device.

But on another idea, I don't know anyone that carries around a separate camera anymore. I've laughingly watched people use iPads as cameras, which is pretty hilarious. Getting images off of a portable camera has always been a PITA, requiring dongles, cables, incantations. It would be cool if Apple enabled AirDrop to be used on portable cameras. When it works, AirDrop just rocks. No dongles, cables, incantations; point and click, so to speak...

The camera companies all seem to have their ways of massaging image data inside their devices. Making images easier to transfer to Apple devices would be fantastic, and then Apple software can 'Appleize' the images. *shrug*
I was thinking something like Fuji's X100V but with the brains of an A-series chip inside, as opposed to an iPhone with a much bigger sensor. But yeah, getting images off wirelessly is a nuisance. I've ended up just pulling the memory card and using a dongle on my iPad.
 
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kiranmk2

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I've haven't been keeping an eye on camera makers in the last few years, but surely they must be looking into processors for computational photography for their cameras otherwise they are in danger of being left behind.
 
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AirunJae

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Apr 14, 2008
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They still use 12MP sensors that's why you don't see many differences in bigger screens..
What I was trying to say is that when I view a photo from an iPhone on a much larger screen, as compared to something from my dedicated camera, I can really tell as the lack of detail/information becomes really apparent. As you said, they're still using 12MP sensors, but I don't think just using something with more megapixels would help. One of those "you can't beat physics" situations with needing a bigger sensor.
 
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CouldBeWorse

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Jul 14, 2011
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It appears to be snapping the noise, and a counter starts running, and there is another click. I must be missing some basic feature. Is this the 'live photo' feature? Is there a way to turn it off, or a better way to deal with the output?
That’s night mode
 
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citysnaps

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Oct 10, 2011
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I always wondered, mostly because I never had an iPhone... Are "regular" users capable of taking such photos? I'm assuming they aren't just "point and shoot." Are they retouched in Photoshop? Or are the advanced camera settings (iso, exposure, etc) adjusted so that these photos come out so pretty?

Absolutely. It has little to do with the camera. It's more about imagination and what moves you. Even though I have dSLRs and mirrorless cameras, I've been shooting with iPhones since 2011 and exclusively for about the last 6 years. The key is always having a camera (for me an iPhone) with me in my pocket. I use them as point-n-shoot devices. I do a little post-processing in Lightroom. But that's something I always did when using "regular" cameras.

Here's a photo I made looking upwards at some trees in a residential neighborhood in Palo Alto, California. The view reminded me of person's carotid artery that feeds one's brain. So I snapped a photo with the phone I had at the time, an iPhone X.

Trees in Palo Alto.jpg
 
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MrCrowbar

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Jan 12, 2006
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Looking back at my pictures from the iPhone 6/6S, they just get better and better through the years. However, when I view the photos on something bigger than a phone screen, you can really tell. My fervent wish is for Apple to partner with someone like FujiFilm to bring the smarts and ease of taking photos on the iPhone to a much larger sensor. Sometimes when taking photos of my kid crawling around with my camera, I wish the process could be as easy as it is on my phone, but with the greater light-gathering/detail/information that comes with a larger sensor. Sigh.
Honestly, I'd love my Canon DSLR to have a way to attach the iPhone so that the brains and display is the iPhone and the camera just supplies sensor data, storage and some quick access buttons.
 
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PinkyMacGodess

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Honestly, I'd love my Canon DSLR to have a way to attach the iPhone so that the brains and display is the iPhone and the camera just supplies sensor data, storage and some quick access buttons.

I thought there was a way to use it as a camera similar to a GoPro. Or it's the Nikon I have. Both are many years old, but I seem to remember something about using the camera as a remote sensor. I've never tried doing it because, why. The iPhone works okay by itself. I may be mistaken. *shrug*
 
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Cosmosent

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Meanwhile, back on the Farm, Samsung's latest TV commercial touts saving a High-Res Burst Photo during Video capture, & in a way Apple have never offered !

To me, that could be the most-impressive thing I've seen out of ANY smartphone "native" Camera App in years !
 
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jntdroid

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Oct 12, 2011
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Some great photos by some clearly talented photographers (even if Apple wants to simply refer to them as "customers"). I think some of those shots are more than doable on any of the iPhones in the last couple of years, but it just goes to show how great the software is, and when combined with a talented eye for photography, great results can be produced.
 
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typecase

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Apple_ShotoniPhone_abdullah_shaijie_011221.jpg


I wonder how this image was captured. Even on a tripod, my iPhone 12 makes muddy astrophotography shots.
 
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organic bond

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I've haven't been keeping an eye on camera makers in the last few years, but surely they must be looking into processors for computational photography for their cameras otherwise they are in danger of being left behind.
Lenses make the difference. I have a fantastic Canon PowerShot G5 X Mark II which has an incredibly bright zoom, nothing less than unique, and the difference is very noticeable.
 
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