MacRumors

macrumors bot
Original poster
Apr 12, 2001
54,166
15,963


Today is Autism Acceptance Day, and as it has done in the past, Apple is recognizing the occasion by highlighting top apps, accessibility tips, and education resources, while also sharing art created by individuals on the spectrum.

appleautismacceptance.jpg

In the Today section of the App Store, Apple is offering a collection of apps that are designed to support neurodiversity and people with autism spectrum disorder.

These apps include Proloquo2Go for those who can't speak or need help being understood, Speech Blubs language therapy app, Streaks to-do app, Calm meditation app, and more.

Apple has dozens of apps that can be accessed through the Autism Acceptance section of the App Store, organized into categories like Communication, Life Skills, Games and entertainment, and Apple Watch tools.

To assist with remote learning, Apple Education is offering support resources for teachers and parents, including one-on-one virtual coaching sessions with Apple Professional Learning Specialists. There's also a collection of Learn and Study From Home apps that families can take advantage of, and Apple's website has a section on customizing the iPad to make learning more accessible.

In addition to these resources, throughout the month of April, Apple will celebrate artistic talent from individuals on the spectrum, highlighting their art and sources of inspiration.

Apple is collaborating with the Art of Autism nonprofit for a "Created on iPad" online exhibit that features 15 emerging artists who identify as autistic.

Apple also plans to feature Kayla Cromer, who stars in Freeform comedy show "Everything's Gonna Be Okay." Cromer is one of the first people on the spectrum to play the role of a character on the spectrum in a major series, and she will share films that have inspired her passion for acting.

Article Link: Apple Highlights Useful Apps, Accessibility Tips and More for Autism Acceptance Day
 

cbusbuck

Suspended
Feb 6, 2020
64
163
Columbus, OH, USA
Comment

sesnir

macrumors 6502
Sep 21, 2008
355
230
Might as well...


What a load of garbage.
 
Comment

mixel

macrumors 68000
Jan 12, 2006
1,713
946
Leeds, UK
Might as well...

"While more research is needed to prove causation" .. No ****. Not exactly doing a great job on the autism acceptance front by.. Blaming the parents? Huh?

I mean, duh, not interacting with a baby risks teaching it weird habits but they'd have to be years older than that to get a ASD diagnosis, so.. Huh? That's just.. An idea. It's not even statistically significant. Autism isn't *just* developmental delays.. Generally most kids catch up. And there are so many other factors involved in whether you're attentive to the kid.. There's nothing to say that if you remove the phone from the equation they'd engage the baby more..? We've had past generations with much less hands on takes to parenting.

There's a rise in diagnosed autism, there isn't necessarily an *actual* rise in autism as the diagnostic criteria have loosened significantly. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Epidemiology_of_autism

(brother on the spectrum, wife on the spectrum.. I've had to do a lot of research, too..)

It's great Apple are doing something for Autism acceptance month, we owe a lot to people with atypical thinking.
 
Comment

VictorTango777

macrumors 6502a
Oct 28, 2017
628
1,297
It appears that Apple is trying to score political points by moving settings from application preferences and burying them in Accessibility preferences on both iOS and MacOS. They want say "Look at us, we have this Accessibility thing with all these settings" when many of those settings should be located in more appropriate places. Examples:

On a Mac laptop, you go to System Preferences > Mouse and you can change scrolling speed. If you go to System Preferences > Trackpad, there is no scrolling speed. Instead, it is buried somewhere in Accessibility preferences.

In System Preferences > Mouse, there is no option to adjust pointer size. Instead, that setting is buried somewhere in Accessibility preferences.

To turn off spring loaded folders in the Finder, you don't go to Finder Preferences. Instead, that setting is buried somewhere in Accessibility preferences.

On iPhone and iPad if you go to Settings >Display & Brightness, there is no setting to control auto brightness. Instead, you have to go to Accessibility.

On iPhones and iPads that have Touch ID, you can configure whether you can wake and unlock the device without having to first press and release home button and then put your finger on the Touch ID. You can just press the home button to wake the device and activate Touch ID without having to release the button. But instead of having this option in Settings > Touch ID, it is buried in Accessibility.

Moving settings from the application and burying them in Accessibility is not helpful at all. It just causes more irritation because people now have to look in two places to find things: the application preferences and Accessibility. Now the Accessibility preferences have become as convoluted as iTunes and this helps no one.
 
Last edited:
Comment
Register on MacRumors! This sidebar will go away, and you'll see fewer ads.