Apple Industry FIRSTS List!

Discussion in 'Apple, Inc and Tech Industry' started by MacFly123, Apr 23, 2009.

  1. MacFly123 macrumors 68020

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    #1
    In another thread a couple people got a list going that I expanded a bit and I thought it was fun :) It was a list of all of the personal computer FIRSTS that belong to Apple.

    Please help me add everything you can think of to this and edit any false claims.

    Thanks, and have fun... GO APPLE! :D

    -The first personal computer with a graphic interface: (Mac)
    -The first personal computer to use a mouse: (Mac)
    -The first personal computer with an application you could install: (Mac)
    -The first personal computer with a program you coud buy separately and install with a disc: (Mac)
    -The first personal computer with SCSI: (Mac)
    -The first personal computer to offer, off the box, a complete computer, with sound card, integrated speaker, independent video card, ethernet, etc.: (Mac)
    -The first personal computer to use CD: (Mac)
    -The first personal computer to have actualy used USB as it is: a universal serial bus: (Mac)
    -The first computer to use firewire: (Mac)
    -The first personal computer to have a DVD recorder: (Mac)
    -The first personal computer with a bunch of apps to work like something you could use at home for all the common activities (iTunes, iPhoto, iMovie, Garageband,etc.): (Mac)
    -The first personal computer to integrate an application with such thing as the iTunes Music Store: (Mac)
    -The first computer to have a total integration with an app and the mp3 player (iPod): (Mac)
    -The same with a cell phone (iPhone): (Mac)
    -First laptop to have button-less trackpad: (MAC)
    -First laptop with a Multi-Touch track pad! (MAC)
    -First personal computer with a graphical word processing program! (MAC)
    -First personal computer with Microsoft Office! (MAC)
    -First personal computer with Fonts! (MAC)
    -First personal computer with built in web cam! (MAC)

    ADD ON!!!
     
  2. aaronw1986 macrumors 68030

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  3. Ivan P macrumors 68030

    Ivan P

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    #3
    - First cell phone with cut/copy/paste (iPhone)

    :rolleyes:
     
  4. djellison macrumors 68020

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    #4
    I'm not sure about a LOT of them.
     
  5. Shivetya macrumors 65816

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    Jan 16, 2008
    #5
    without dates the list is pointless.

    W Windows (precursor to X Windows was before Mac)


    Xerox released a PC in 1981 with a mouse.



    I would spend more time, but the OP needs to be the one getting the dates for his just so he'd have something to back himself up with
     
  6. instaxgirl macrumors 65816

    instaxgirl

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    #6
    The first with a web cam? Is that right, 'cause I'm sure when I bought my iBook half the laptops I looked at had web cams built in . . .
     
  7. mysterytramp macrumors 65816

    mysterytramp

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    #7
    A few things ...

    1) While Apple may deserve some of these, several of them aren't Mac but Lisa or even Apple II.

    2) "The first personal computer with a program you coud buy separately and install with a disc: (Mac)" Apple surely didn't invent bundled software, or are you referring to Visicalc on an Apple II?

    3) "The first personal computer with an application you could install: (Mac)" All software, to work, must be installed and software existed prior to the Mac, or is there a nuance I'm missing?

    4) While iTunes is revolutionary, it is in essence a giant proprietary point-of-sale system. It might be hard to claim it's the first. You might be able to find some old hardcore CompuServe/GEnie users who can provide evidence that they did much the same thing in the early 80s.

    5) "First personal computer with Fonts! (MAC)" It may gall some people, but pica and elite on old dot-matrix and letter-quality printers also constitute "fonts" so this one isn't quite true. And if you go the TrueType/Postscript route, be sure to check with someone who remembers old Compugraphic equipment. They certainly looked like personal computers even if they didn't come with icons.

    mt
     
  8. velocityg4 macrumors 68040

    velocityg4

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    #8
    Even that was beat by the IBM 5100 in 1975.

    The IBM 5100. Had built in storage, it was portable (beating the Osbourne), built in screen, built in keyboard, and had tape/printer i/o ports, you could run BASIC and APL programs.

    Which I would say constitutes a "complete computer".

    Even earlier than that was the Xerox Alto, 1973. It had a GUI, used a mouse, had built in Ethernet, hard drive and other i/o ports. You could run an early text editor, paint program, email, chat, games and numerous other programs.

    Though never sold commercially, several thousand Alto's were built and used by parties outside of Xerox and designed as a personal computer.

    However the early GUI was more of a hybrid between GUI and a command prompt that could use a mouse, sort of like the DOS shell. Smalltalk made later in the 70's for the Alto become a full GUI.

    Just think if those executives at Xerox had some foresight and protected there intellectual property and worked on producing consumer machines rather than unbelievably expensive workstations. We might all be using Xerox's today. Instead they let Apple, Microsoft and all of the other early GUI makers rip off there design.
     
  9. notjustjay macrumors 603

    notjustjay

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    #9
    I guess it depends on the definition of "personal computer".

    Was a "personal computer" one that was specifically marketed for consumer home use? Or simply a computer small enough to be usable by someone in their home (even if that wasn't the target market).

    The IBM 5100, for example, cost up to $20,000 and clearly wasn't targeted for the home user.

    I would argue that Apple's strength isn't necessarily about INDUSTRY firsts, but about taking technologies and making them acccessible to the common person.

    For example, the OP lists correctly that the Mac was the first computer to bring USB devices to the masses. Apple wasn't the first to use USB, and didn't invent USB. But at the time, it was largely a chicken-and-egg scenario: Nobody had USB ports unless they bought a new PC or a PCI expansion card; nobody wanted to do that until there were useful USB devices to justify the upgrade. People who did have USB ports didn't use them, because nobody made USB devices because the target market was so small! Apple transitioned their computers to use USB and suddenly there was a reason for everyone to make the switch.

    iMovie and built-in Firewire brought video editing to the masses. There was certainly video editing on computers long before Apple, but it was professional/prosumer equipment (like the Amiga Video Toaster), needed special capture boards, expensive editing software like Adobe Premiere. Then Firewire came along and suddenly all you needed was a fast PC with big, fast hard drives, a Firewire interface card, and the expensive editing software. I remember this because starting in 1998 I hung out in rec.video.desktop for years, picking up hints on what capture board, what software, what hardware to buy.

    Now, anyone and their grandmother can edit video right out of the box, a move spurred on in large part by Apple's inclusion of iMovie with every Mac. Microsoft soon followed on with Windows Movie Maker. The professionals still talk about expensive software and capture hardware, but it's a given today that pretty much any computer is fully capable of doing most of the same things.

    (Aside: This was why I switched to Apple! I had bought a very well-researched, expensive, top-of-the-line Dell laptop optimized for video editing. While very fast, it was not quite able to do real-time previews. One day I was asked to do a quick last-minute project, and I said no, there was not enough time, based on how long I knew it would take me to capture, edit, render, output back to tape. Instead they asked a random guy with his Titanium PowerBook if he'd do it. I scoffed inside -- this guy had no video editing experience, had a computer 2 years older than mine, didn't have the professional software that I did. If *I* couldn't do it in time, surely there was no way HE could! But he did! With iMovie! Using its instant, full-screen, real-time preview! And then he turned the project into a DVD! That experience left me shaken, and embarrassed. What else could Apple products do that I didn't know about!? A few months later I bought a PowerBook and found out...)

    Apple did the same with desktop publishing. What was once limited to industry professionals became accessible to anyone and everyone.

    They're doing the same now with music, and application programming and distribution. Anyone and everyone could get themselves on iTunes, get themselves featured on the iPhone App Store.
     
  10. Melrose macrumors 604

    Melrose

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    Dec 12, 2007
    #10
    I was going to mention rthis also - but Im not sure they were the first; They did were the first to make it a common feature and get the industry to do the same.

    I would agree.

    OP: Where's the mention of the Newton? Where's that printer thing that Apple was the first to bring to market? Mass-produced Digital camera? Portable computer? Hmm.. I agree that list needs some work.
     
  11. miles01110 macrumors Core

    miles01110

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    #11
    They've probably been put out of the OPs mind. Fanboys don't acknowledge failures, remember?
     
  12. MacFly123 thread starter macrumors 68020

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    #12
    Ok you seriously need to chill out! :rolleyes: I love Apple but I am not some mindless fanboy. I will openly admit things Apple does that I would change or that they messed up etc.

    The reason I made this list was because I saw someone in another forum start it and it looked fun and I wanted to know the TRUTH. I have researched quite a bit about Apple's and the computer industries history but I am far from an expert and was not alive at the time.

    Perhaps I should change some of the verbiage in the list to make it more accurate. But my entire point of this thread was to have knowledgeable people help me expand and edit it in TRUTH!

    I have made the claims state "first commercial home personal computer" and changed (MAC) to (APPLE) as I did not intend to refer ONLY to the Macintosh but all Apple computers, Lisa, Apple II etc.

    So here is an updated list:

    -First commercial home personal computer with a graphic interface: (APPLE)
    -First commercial home personal computer to use a mouse: (APPLE)
    -First commercial home personal computer with an application you could install: (APPLE)
    -First commercial home personal computer with a program you coud buy separately and install with a disc: (APPLE)
    -First commercial home personal computer with SCSI: (APPLE)
    -First commercial home personal computer to offer, off the box, a complete computer, with sound card, integrated speaker, independent video card, ethernet, etc.: (APPLE)
    -First commercial home personal computer to use CD: (APPLE)
    -First commercial home personal computer to have actualy used USB as it is: a universal serial bus: (APPLE)
    -First commercial home personal computer to use firewire: (APPLE)
    -First commercial home personal computer to have a DVD recorder: (APPLE)
    -First commercial home personal computer with a bunch of apps to work like something you could use at home for all the common activities (iTunes, iPhoto, iMovie, Garageband,etc.): (APPLE)
    -First commercial home personal computer to integrate an application with such thing as the iTunes Music Store: (APPLE)
    -First commercial home personal computer to have a total integration with an app and the mp3 player (iPod): (APPLE)
    -Same with a cell phone (iPhone): (APPLE)
    -First laptop to have button-less trackpad: (APPLE)
    -First laptop with a Multi-Touch track pad! (APPLE)
    -First commercial home personal computer with a graphical word processing program! (APPLE)
    -First commercial home personal computer with Microsoft Office! (APPLE)
    -First commercial home personal computer with Fonts! (APPLE)
    -First commercial home personal computer with built in web cam! (APPLE)
    -First commercial Personal Digital Assistant (Newton): (APPLE)

    I feel pretty good about the list now and am pretty positive about the web cam one.

    If you know something to not be true in the current state of the list THEN CORRECT IT and share your knowledge with us. If you know others HELP US EXPAND IT.

    Again, the point here is TRUTH, so lets work together and make a nice list that we can be proud of. I know Apple did not invent everything, but it is a great innovative company that I admire much more than others. There should be lots of truthful things for us to list.

    Thanks for all the help everyone!
     
  13. Eraserhead macrumors G4

    Eraserhead

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    #13
    USB was definitely on PC's before the iMac...

    Wireless networking was an Apple first that has been missed, though I don't know about the reliability of the rest...
     
  14. clevin macrumors G3

    clevin

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    #14
    it would be more convincing if you attach some reference links after each of the "first" you listed.

    You dont expect us to blindly take whatever you said as truth, aren't you?
     
  15. Benguitar Guest

    Benguitar

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    #15
    I personally don't think that was necessary.

    I personally found this thread to be quite interesting. :)
     
  16. Ryan1524 macrumors 65816

    Ryan1524

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    #16
    It might be more accurate if you put 'Mainstream' in front most of them. ;)
     
  17. MisterMe macrumors G4

    MisterMe

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    USA
    #17
    Truth is a philosophical term. To say that one interpretation of events is the truth precludes all alternative points of view.

    There is another fundamental flaw in what you are trying to do. The history of personal computers is a rich tapestry. It is trivial in the extreme to try to tell its history with a list of firsts. A list of firsts is an invitation to argue rather than an invitation to educate and be educated. A chapter in a book if not a whole book if not a set of volumes can be devoted to the history each item on your list.
     
  18. FX120 macrumors 65816

    FX120

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    #18
    I don't believe any of the bolded items to be true.
     
  19. Axemantitan macrumors 6502

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    #19
    Here is an old list of Apple innovations and when the PC world got them. Problem is, it hasn't been updated since 1999!
     
  20. MacFly123 thread starter macrumors 68020

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    Dec 25, 2006
    #20
    For all of you constructively contributing, thank you!

    To all of you doing otherwise, you are welcome to leave and I encourage you to leave. You have just about ruined this whole thing for me. Honestly, why can't people just chill the freak out? It is a fun list. I never said it was 100% accurate, I didn't even write 95% of it, I saw it in some other thread and I asked for help to expand and correct it.

    Some of you people on here are seriously pathetic. :mad: :rolleyes:
     
  21. miles01110 macrumors Core

    miles01110

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    #21
    Ironic statement of the year, coincidentally.

    Anyways, you still refuse to put dates on your list of "firsts" which automatically eliminates any sort of legitimacy. Seems to me that the only explanation of your failure to do so is an unwillingness to expose yourself to the possibility that you might be wrong.
     
  22. clevin macrumors G3

    clevin

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    Aug 6, 2006
    #22
    calm down, you are not in a position, nor should you expect to be in a position, to pick who read the stuff you write. This is an open forum.

    Also, if you are not trying to be accurate, then you should not posting them, otherwise you are intentionally misleading readers.

    I really don't enjoy reading false stuff.

    I understand your good intention of praising the company you love, but try to be accurate, and be clear about the items you are not sure, do some search on internet. There are too many people here at MR. the false information can be spread fairly quickly, and misinformed people are most difficult to make right decision.
     
  23. mysterytramp macrumors 65816

    mysterytramp

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    Maryland
    #23
    You DO need to work on what you're saying. Some of these don't make a lot of sense.

    Could you spend 10 minutes with Wikipedia and do some of the research on your own?

    Here's a start.

    mt
     
  24. velocityg4 macrumors 68040

    velocityg4

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    #24
    The problem with this list which I tried to point out the flaws in with my earlier post is that it all depends on your definition of first. Take the IBM 5100.

    It did beat the Apple to the market. It was a personal computer as only one person could use it at a time. However it cost $20,000 dollars. Now this would not be a home computer for the average person. But I imagine it may have been a home and travel computer for say a VP of engineering at Northrop Grumman.

    The same would go for a graphic interface, which I assume is referring to the GUI. Now the Xerox Alto was not produced commercially even though several thousand were built I suppose these would not count. However, the Xerox 8010 "Star" was released in 1981. This still predates the Apple Lisa released in 1981. However, these ran $16,000 and a typical office system ran $50,000 to $100,000. Still I could still see a high level engineering or other executive having one of these in there home. Since these were designed for one user at a time that still makes the a personal computer.

    Now if the criteria for the list is that they are first to install these technologies into home personal computers, which resulted in viable and commercially successful products. Then I would tend to agree with the list.
     
  25. miles01110 macrumors Core

    miles01110

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    #25
    In addition to the excellent points made before, a great many of these list items are either trivial or are more or less the same (in addition to those that are simply wrong). For example:

    Uh?

    The latter is a result of the former.

    What is a graphical word processing program?

    Seriously?

    Monospaced fonts are still fonts.
     

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