Apple Keeps Emailing Me Saying Someone Keeps Trying To Login to My Account

HappyDude20

macrumors 68030
Original poster
Jul 13, 2008
2,896
296
Los Angeles, Ca
Hi all,

So every other day for almost the past week i'll get an email from Apple saying an attempted login happened like at 11pm, or 7am and says that if it was me trying to login then to not worry, but otherwise someone may have tried unsuccessfully to log into my account and the email stated my account was still secure.

However, this keeps happening every other day so i can't help but wonder if someone i know is trying to log into my account. Is there anyway to log into my icloud/apple account and see where the attempted logins at taking place? Obviously this may give me insight as to if it would be an old ex-gf or something of that sort.

Cheers!
 

HappyDude20

macrumors 68030
Original poster
Jul 13, 2008
2,896
296
Los Angeles, Ca
Do you have 2 factor authentication turned on? If you don't, now is the time.
No, I guess I should and will.

But can't I check where these logins are taking place? After all, it is my account and I hate that whoever is trying to get into my account keeps doing so at oddly predictable times.
 

Menel

macrumors 603
Aug 4, 2011
6,211
1,162
No, I guess I should and will.

But can't I check where these logins are taking place? After all, it is my account and I hate that whoever is trying to get into my account keeps doing so at oddly predictable times.
Don't guess you should.

Do not pass go, do not collect $200, go directly to acct security and set it up, yesterday!
 
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Speedman100

macrumors 6502
Jul 21, 2013
351
236
Yeah, turn on the two-factor thing. It will make it basically impossible for someone to login to your account unless they have access to one of your trusted devices. Plus, if you are able to actually set up two-factor instead of the older two-step, it will give you a rough picture of the person's location when they try to login to your account.
 

Pspressart

macrumors regular
Sep 14, 2012
214
97
There is no way I'm aware of for you to get location data for the failed login attempts.
I have two factor authentication turned on for my Apple ID with iCloud. Whenever I log into icloud.com or applied.apple.com from a previously unknown/untrusted computer browser, I have to enter a six digit verification number which is generated by a trusted device. Recently, in the last week or two, I got an alert message saying that my Apple ID is bring used to sign in on a device near "XXX", the town I live in. If I choose allow, the alert generates the needed verification number. The naming of the location, including a map, is new.
 

JackieInCo

Suspended
Jul 18, 2013
5,178
1,598
Colorado
A few years ago, I had someone sign up for an iTunes account using a Gmail account that I rarely use. When I used the forgotten password link in iTunes to change the password of that persons iTunes account, I was able to login and see their name, address and credit card info. They weren't able to verify the account since it was my email address they used so I changed everything to my info and never actually used the iTunes account after that.

Not related to what's happening to the OP, the post just reminded me of this.
 

chaos2k62

macrumors newbie
Feb 12, 2017
1
0
Yeah, turn on the two-factor thing. It will make it basically impossible for someone to login to your account unless they have access to one of your trusted devices. Plus, if you are able to actually set up two-factor instead of the older two-step, it will give you a rough picture of the person's location when they try to login to your account.
i wouldn't suggest doing this ...i guess i did i don't know how i did but like he said "It will make is basically impossible for someone to login to your account" even yourself when ever i try to login on my mac book my iPhone gets the notification that some one is trying to log on in Toronto ...im in F**KING new brunswick and it tells me my password is wrong i changed my iTunes passwords 3 times still try to login on my macbook tells me my passwords are wrong
dont do the two factor thing it will make your Mac books paper weights
 

WeatherMate

macrumors member
Mar 17, 2015
73
4
san francisco, california
Multi-factor authentication is the best defense against a myriad of attack vectors that seek to compromise data from a cell phone and in addition to two level authentication, you sohuld also utilize a strong password for your account.
 
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