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Apr 12, 2001
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Apple this morning launched a revamped and redesigned Privacy website designed to make its privacy policies more accessible to consumers.

The new site better outlines how Apple's commitment to privacy benefits users through concrete examples of features like Apple Pay and an iPhone's passcode, and it explains how Apple uses encryption, Differential Privacy, and strict app guidelines to protect users.

appleprivacytouchid-800x562.jpg

Apple has a section on the new privacy site that cover all of its apps and features, including iMessage, Apple Pay, Health, Analytics, Safari, iCloud, CarPlay, Education, Photos, Siri, Apple Music, News, Maps, and more.

It's incredibly detailed and explains the security measures and privacy features built into each and every feature.

appleprivacyapplepay-800x563.jpg

There's also a new feature on how to secure devices with a passcode and Touch ID, and how to keep your Apple ID safe with a strong password, two-factor authentication, and an awareness of scams and phishing attempts. It explains how these features work, and beyond that, why customers should want to use them.

appleprivacyappleid-800x564.jpg

Apple has long had a transparent privacy policy and has outlined all of its privacy practices on its website, but this new site does so in a way that's easier for customers to understand and digest in just a few minutes. For anyone who has a question about one of Apple's products, the new site is worth checking out.

Article Link: Apple Launches New Consumer-Friendly Privacy Site
 

Blizzardman

macrumors regular
Apr 7, 2010
229
338
Gilbert, Arizona
It's strange how they tout TouchID as the most advanced security technology on a phone when they were saying FaceID is more secure... I guess they'll update the page once X is released?
 
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Naraxus

macrumors 65816
Oct 13, 2016
1,398
6,169
Apple values the consumers privacy on a high level.
If that was the case they wouldn't have extorted $3billion from Google to be the default for Siri & have used Duck Duck Go instead, they wouldn't track/use information about you to sell ad slots etc.

The amount of misinformation about what Google doesn't do and what Apple does is rather sad.
 

springsup

macrumors 65816
Feb 14, 2013
1,151
955
The more Apple tie their brand to privacy, the more I trust them with it.

Apple’s brand is the most valuable thing they have. The louder they are about privacy, the bigger the cost if they ever slip up.

They didn’t need to go down this route. They could have advocated other aspects of their products. They chose to make this a feature.
 

ramallite

macrumors regular
Jan 5, 2004
151
300
Greensboro
Is Apple Pay really that secure, though?

There's one thing that has bothered me for a while and I cannot get an answer on Apple's discussion forums. There is at least one merchant where my paper receipt contains the last 4 digits of my ACTUAL credit card, even though I use contactless pay. This happens regardless of whether I use my iPhone or my Apple Watch to pay, and regardless of which credit card I use. Everywhere else, the last 4 digits will be that of the device account number as it should be. At this particular merchant, payments show up on my credit card bill as having been paid using the contactless method (as they should). But the paper receipt I get baffles me.

What does it mean that the last 4 digits of my ACTUAL credit card are always printed on the receipts from this merchant? Are they receiving my actual credit card number when I use Apple Pay? They shouldn't be, and it bothers me to no end only because it means Apple Pay may not be as secure as Apple claims.
 
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69Mustang

macrumors 604
Jan 7, 2014
7,874
15,011
In between a rock and a hard place
As long as no one confuses what's being stated here: https://www.apple.com/privacy/ with what's being stated here: https://www.apple.com/legal/privacy/en-ww/ then you should be okay. One is marketing the other is not. In case anyone is confused, this one is marketing: https://www.apple.com/privacy/
[doublepost=1506531766][/doublepost]
Small things like this is what differentiates Apple from the rest.

Glad to see Apple taking a stand. Shame on Google and Microsoft.
You guys should get out more.:) https://privacy.google.com/index.html#
 

fairuz

macrumors 68020
Aug 27, 2017
2,486
2,589
Silicon Valley
lol my Apple data is safer than my personal data like ssn
Seriously. I have to give out my SSN to rent apartments. They probably store it on some PC running Windows XP, and I know for a fact at least one of them has been hacked and infected with WannaCry. And then there are all the backwards government organizations that also have it.

Wish I could give out a signed SHA-2 hash of my SSN instead and let them verify my identity that way.
 

ideal.dreams

macrumors 68020
Jul 19, 2010
2,338
943
Ohio
Say anything you want about Apple, their stance on privacy is unmatched. It's so refreshing to have a billion dollar company treating you like a person instead of a data point they can sell to another company to profit from. I guess with a $999 iPhone they don't need to :p
 

supercoolmanchu

macrumors 6502
Mar 5, 2012
313
591
Hollywood
As long as no one confuses what's being stated here: https://www.apple.com/privacy/ with what's being stated here: https://www.apple.com/legal/privacy/en-ww/ then you should be okay. One is marketing the other is not. In case anyone is confused, this one is marketing: https://www.apple.com/privacy/
[doublepost=1506531766][/doublepost]


You guys should get out more.:) https://privacy.google.com/index.html#

When did Google’s word become trusted?

Several high profile instances, where they’ve broken promises regarding their privacy and data integrity.
You can start by searching for ‘do no evil’. Might want to use a different search engine though, they’ve got a long way to go before anything close to trust happens.
 
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iapplelove

Suspended
Nov 22, 2011
5,324
7,632
East Coast USA
Seriously. I have to give out my SSN to rent apartments. They probably store it on some PC running Windows XP, and I know for a fact at least one of them has been hacked and infected with WannaCry. And then there are all the backwards government organizations that also have it.

Wish I could give out a signed SHA-2 hash of my SSN instead and let them verify my identity that way.

After this Equifax breach, a ssn will never be the same again.
 

fairuz

macrumors 68020
Aug 27, 2017
2,486
2,589
Silicon Valley
Say anything you want about Apple, their stance on privacy is unmatched. It's so refreshing to have a billion dollar company treating you like a person instead of a data point they can sell to another company to profit from. I guess with a $999 iPhone they don't need to :p
Don't trust either of them if you truly have strong need for privacy for things besides credit cards and whatever that of course they'd all keep private.

Apple also can profit from user data, and there is evidence of them violating user privacy. A couple of examples: Apple was caught saving full, permanent, unencrypted location history locally on iPhones (EDIT: not referring to Frequent Locations)**. An high-ranked employee said they have enough users for any potential learning projects based on iMessage data* (goes against their claims of end-to-end encryption).

* Search "why imessage won't come to android"
** Hard to find because old, dug this up: http://mashable.com/2011/04/20/iphone-location-history/#4YoV8mHb2Oq4
 
Last edited:

macTW

Suspended
Oct 17, 2016
1,395
1,975
The company with the most secure biometric unlocking system ever for a mobile phone (Touch ID) found a way to make it even more secure (Face ID) all while releasing a white paper to outline the features and security many wanted to see.

This is why I buy Apple.
 
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69Mustang

macrumors 604
Jan 7, 2014
7,874
15,011
In between a rock and a hard place
When did Google’s word become trusted?

Several high profile instances, where they’ve broken promises regarding their privacy and data integrity.
You can start by searching for ‘do no evil’. Might want to use a different search engine though, they’ve got a long way to go before anything close to trust happens.
What does anything you wrote have to do with my quote? My quote was 1. A PSA-like message not to confuse the marketing with the legal. 2. A counter point to the "only Apple would do this" quotes.
 

lowendlinux

macrumors 603
Sep 24, 2014
5,376
6,641
Germany
What does anything you wrote have to do with my quote? My quote was 1. A PSA-like message not to confuse the marketing with the legal. 2. A counter point to the "only Apple would do this" quotes.

he's saying teh googs lies to you and Apple doesn't
 

tkermit

macrumors 68040
Feb 20, 2004
3,556
2,769
Awesome to see a company use the issue of privacy as a unique selling point! As long as they stay true to their word.
 

0003939

Suspended
Jun 2, 2017
160
222
Don't trust either of them if you truly have strong need for privacy for things besides credit cards and whatever that of course they'd all keep private.

Apple also can profit from user data, and there is evidence of them violating user privacy. A couple of examples: Apple was caught saving location history locally on iPhones. An high-ranked employee said they have enough users for any potential learning projects based on iMessage data* (goes against their claims of end-to-end encryption).

* Search "why imessage won't come to android"
I do not understand why storing location history locally is a problem. I would not rather have Google storing location history on their cloud.
 
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