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In developer documentation outlining systemwide changes to the App Store in the European Union, Apple explains why alternative app stores, alternative payment options, and other updates are being limited to the EU.

iPhone-Security-Feature-1.jpg

Apple claims that these changes are introducing notable risks for users and developers, introducing "new avenues for malware, fraud and scams, illicit and harmful content, and other privacy and security threats."

Further, Apple says that the updates compromise its ability to "detect, prevent, and take action" against malicious apps, and also to support users impacted by issues with apps that are downloaded outside of the App Store.

"We're limiting these changes to the European Union because we're concerned about their impacts on the privacy and security of our users' experience - which remains our North Star," Apple writes.

To limit risk, Apple is requiring alternative app stores to undergo a notarization process that will check for malware and viruses, but Apple will not evaluate an app's content. Though notarization will add safeguards, Apple says there is risk involved with the alternate app store system.
If not properly managed, alternative distribution poses increased privacy, safety, and security risks for users and developers. This includes risks from installing software from unknown developers that are not subject to the Apple Developer Program requirements, installing software that compromises system integrity with malware or other malicious code, the distribution of pirated software, exposure to illicit, objectionable, and harmful content due to lower content and moderation standards, and increased risks of scams, fraud, and abuse. Apple has less ability to address these risks, and to support and refund customers regarding these issues. Even with safeguards, many of these risks remain.
Going forward, Apple plans to engage with the European Union, developer community, and EU users about the impacts of alternative app stores.

Outside of the EU, app developers must continue to use the App Store and in-app purchase system as usual.

Article Link: Apple Limiting Alternative App Stores and Payments to EU Due to Malware, Fraud and Scam Risks
 

SoldOnApple

macrumors 65816
Jul 20, 2011
1,009
1,679
I've been installing emulators on all my devices and computers, including Macs, for decades now. Allowing me to do it again, in the EU anyway, just brings back the status quo. Apple could have allowed emulator developers into their development program to release them for free on the App Store whenever they wanted but they chose not to let people install what they want on their own devices.
 

I7guy

macrumors Nehalem
Nov 30, 2013
34,202
23,923
Gotta be in it to win it
I've been installing emulators on all my devices and computers, including Macs, for decades now. Allowing me to do it again, in the EU anyway, just brings back the status quo. Apple could have allowed emulator developers into their development program to release them for free on the App Store whenever they wanted but they chose not to let people install what they want on their own devices.
You can buy an android that provides that capability.
 

ItsASpider

macrumors regular
Apr 20, 2021
107
670
There are no "malware, fraud, and scam risks" related to any of these issues. Unless Apple is saying here that macOS is also a globally insecure platform.

Let's just name it what it is; Apple is scared that they'll actually have to bother providing compelling services to developers instead of getting by default 30% of the revenue of anything and everything even if not only they don't do a single thing to earn that, but the party that has to pay them 30% is left with all other costs as well...

most customers don't give a flying **** about this. only the whiney minority is asking for this so they can pirate apps and install emulators because they miss their 90's childhood.
I don't care for emulators, nor do I care to pirate apps. I just want to be able to install apps that I should just be able to install and not be blocked from using my device for whatever I want to use it just because Apple has some arbitrary policy that blocks apps if it even remotely threatens their 30% cut for doing nothing. The fact that they are adjusting rules globally as well to allow services like Xbox Cloud Gaming and GeForce already shows what this is about; they are afraid that these would otherwise only be available through alternatives and that they'd be pushing their users to install these alternatives because they know they cannot beat them without accepting them as well.
 

falainber

macrumors 68040
Mar 16, 2016
3,420
3,990
Wild West
Apple explains why alternative app stores, alternative payment options, and other updates are being limited to the EU. Apple claims that these changes are introducing notable risks for users and developers, introducing "new avenues for malware, fraud and scams, illicit and harmful content, and other privacy and security threats."

They are lying. We all know that they do it in EU only because only EU demanded them to allow alternative app stores and other countries did not (not yet).
 

neuropsychguy

macrumors 68020
Sep 29, 2008
2,379
5,660
Yes protect us with the 30% commission 😂
Commissions are not that high for most developers. Also Apple is providing and option for commissions that are 17% and 10%, but with some caveats. This is from the other related MacRumors article.

"While there are no commissions for alternative app marketplaces and alternative payment systems, there is a Core Technology Fee that is .50 euros per install per account on an annual basis. The first 1 million installs are free for all developers, but after 1 million installs, the fee comes into play.

"App developers who choose to continue to distribute under the App Store will pay Apple reduced commission with the new terms. Apple is dropping the 30 percent commission to 17 percent, and the 15 percent commission paid for subscriptions over a year old or by small businesses will drop to 10 percent. Apple says the vast majority of apps will qualify for the 10 percent rate.

"Developers have a choice between opting into the new business terms in the EU or sticking with the ‌App Store‌ terms as they are today. Developers who choose to maintain the status quo will pay the fees they pay now -- 15 to 30 percent commission.

"Developers who opt for the updated business terms will pay the reduced commissions, will have access to alternative app stores, and will also be subject to the Core Technology Fee. There is an also optional 3 percent payment processing fee for those who choose to continue to use Apple's integrated payment system rather than an alternative payment system under the new terms."

Developers can opt to keep the higher commissions and avoid some of the other fees but those fees won't kick in for many developers. Business will need to crunch numbers and see if the old or new fees work better for them.
 
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iVoid

macrumors 65816
Jan 9, 2007
1,145
190
Time to first iOS major malware/ransomware attack in EU... .02 seconds after 17.4 goes live.

Note to app developers: I *WILL NOT* download and install apps from other app stores. Offer it in Apple's mostly trustworthy App Store or I won't use it.
 

neuropsychguy

macrumors 68020
Sep 29, 2008
2,379
5,660
There are no "malware, fraud, and scam risks" related to any of these issues. Unless Apple is saying here that macOS is also a globally insecure platform.

Let's just name it what it is; Apple is scared that they'll actually have to bother providing compelling services to developers instead of getting by default 30% of the revenue of anything and everything even if not only they don't do a single thing to earn that, but the party that has to pay them 30% is left with all other costs as well...

Read the other MacRumors article:

"While there are no commissions for alternative app marketplaces and alternative payment systems, there is a Core Technology Fee that is .50 euros per install per account on an annual basis. The first 1 million installs are free for all developers, but after 1 million installs, the fee comes into play.

App developers who choose to continue to distribute under the App Store will pay Apple reduced commission with the new terms. Apple is dropping the 30 percent commission to 17 percent, and the 15 percent commission paid for subscriptions over a year old or by small businesses will drop to 10 percent. Apple says the vast majority of apps will qualify for the 10 percent rate."

Granted, there will still be higher fees for developers who stick with the status quo, but there is an option for lower commissions but potentially with other fees. At the end of the day, if developers see lower total fees depends on many factors. Businesses will figure it out.
 
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truthsteve

macrumors 6502a
Nov 3, 2023
679
1,709
Apple could have allowed emulator developers into their development program to release them for free on the App Store whenever they wanted but they chose not to let people install what they want on their own devices.

and then you can move on to android because they have what you want. as how a free market should be.
 

AlexESP

macrumors 6502a
Sep 7, 2014
613
1,635
The worst of all is that the EU won’t get blamed for the issues this will cause - instead, people will complain to Apple because they didn’t get a refund, can’t install an app, etc.

When there’s no skin in the game, this kind of things happen: the EU designs the phone but doesn’t take the hit for its errors. Best case scenario is that limitations make this DMA irrelevant.
 

ItsASpider

macrumors regular
Apr 20, 2021
107
670
The worst of all is that the EU won’t get blamed for the issues this will cause - instead, people will complain to Apple because they didn’t get a refund, can’t install an app, etc.
The problem with this statement here is that none of that is based in reality and since every other platform has always worked this exact same way we know that this isn't the case. When Steam has issues, people don't complain to Microsoft they didn't get a refund, when an app installer fails on Android, people don't complain to Google that it doesn't work. This is just nonsense and you repeating talking points...
 

SoldOnApple

macrumors 65816
Jul 20, 2011
1,009
1,679
You can buy an android that provides that capability.
I side load it myself through the alt store. But I shouldn't have to. If I lived in the EU I wouldn't have to.

and then you can move on to android because they have what you want. as how a free market should be.
I side load it myself through AltStore on my iPhone and iPad. But I'd much rather download it through the App Store.
 

aidler

macrumors 6502
Jun 18, 2009
464
1,086
Time to first iOS major malware/ransomware attack in EU... .02 seconds after 17.4 goes live.

Note to app developers: I *WILL NOT* download and install apps from other app stores. Offer it in Apple's mostly trustworthy App Store or I won't use it.
You have that choice and I can already see that you will use it wisely.
 
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ItsASpider

macrumors regular
Apr 20, 2021
107
670
Time to first iOS major malware/ransomware attack in EU... .02 seconds after 17.4 goes live.

Note to app developers: I *WILL NOT* download and install apps from other app stores. Offer it in Apple's mostly trustworthy App Store or I won't use it.
If iOS security breaks down due to this, that really is just Apples fault and would indicate some serious security issues that they just didn't bother to fix. That *would* in fact imply iOS is rotten to the core.

Not to mention that Apple regularly has to kick out scams and other fraudulent apps from the App Store, so there is that too.
 
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