Apple Lossless use

Discussion in 'Mac Basics and Help' started by Morod, Oct 26, 2008.

  1. Morod macrumors 68000

    Morod

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2008
    Location:
    On The Nickel, over there....
    #1
    Hey again,
    I've been hearing a lot of good things about Apple Lossless for audio work. How do I access it? I download some songs from the iTunes Store, and occasionally burn a CD of my songlists to play in the car. With either of these tasks, is Apple Lossless an option to use? Could anyone tell me where to find out more about this? Thanks!
    Morod
    PS... I tried a search on this site and there were 425 hits. I checked the first 50 and none had what I was looking for.
     
  2. zachsilvey macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2008
    Location:
    Battle Ground
    #2
    Apple Lossless is a compression codec that preserves the full audio quality while reducing file size. It can be acesessed in the ripping menu of iTunes. Keep in mind that if you download a song from iTunes Music Store it is compressed so if you burn it and rerip it, it will still be at the same quality. Also Lossless files are much larger, about 30 megs a song.
     
  3. PlaceofDis macrumors Core

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2004
    #3
    you'll actually lose a bit of quality burning and then re-ripping.

    but yes its a codec for ripping your songs.
     
  4. ChrisA macrumors G4

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2006
    Location:
    Redondo Beach, California
    #4
    No, Apple lossless is not going to help you at all.

    What it is usfull for is if you have a CD rip the tracks and need to compress the files to save space. You could use AAC or MP3 or Apple Lossless.

    They call it "lossless" because unlike AAC or MP3 nothing is lost in the compression process. So, if you start with AAC you have already lost information and sound quality converting the format will not get this back.
     
  5. ChrisA macrumors G4

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2006
    Location:
    Redondo Beach, California
    #5
    If you were to re-rip it to MP3 or AAC, then yes you loose quality in the process but if you rip to lossless the result your ears hear is bit for bit identical to what you had when you started except of course the files size is now "way huge".
     

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