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Original poster
Apr 12, 2001
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Apple is making it easier for anyone to create an ad campaign using its iAd Workbench mobile advertising tool. As noted by Ad Age, the company is now allowing any person with an Apple ID to open an iAd Workbench account and create an ad campaign, a feature previously restricted to registered developers. The changes will make it simpler for advertisers, small and large, to create ads for the platform.

iadworkbenchexpansion.jpg
At the onset of its mobile-ad business, Apple extended olive branches to a select group of brands, promising premier reach. But advertisers pushed back against its pricey offerings. Now, it appears Apple has concluded money in mobile ads comes from a wide net; in short, it'll look more like Google.
Apple is also introducing new features to Workbench, its web-based platform used for tracking and launching campaigns. Users can now include short videos in an ad, which will be displayed full screen on the iPad and the iPhone, as first described earlier this year. Previously, iPhone ads were limited to less obtrusive banners that needed to be tapped before a video would play. Video iAds are also able to send viewers to websites or promoted iTunes content, rather than just mobile apps.

At the current point in time, the iAd Workbench expansion is limited to mobile ads and does not extend to iTunes Radio. Ad buyers are able to pay based on cost-per-click or cost-per-thousand impressions.

The company is likely hoping to attract new advertisers to the iAd platform with the introduction of videos and the simplification of account creation. Since its 2010 debut, iAd has been largely unsuccessful gaining advertising partners, but Apple has been aiming to revive iAd since the introduction of iTunes Radio.

Several major advertising partners, including McDonald's, Nissan, Pepsi, and Procter & Gamble signed up for iAd when iTunes Radio debuted and Apple has managed to increase iAd revenue to $260 million in 2013 from $38 million in 2011.

Article Link: Apple Makes it Easier to Create and Buy iAds, Introduces Short Video Ads
 

LastLine

macrumors 65816
Aug 24, 2005
1,312
21
To me the biggest limitation of using iAd as a developer wasn't what I could do with it, it was the budget I had to put in to get it started up - it was out of reach of small developers unfortunately.
 

Twimfy

macrumors 6502a
Sep 11, 2011
885
236
UK
To me the biggest limitation of using iAd as a developer wasn't what I could do with it, it was the budget I had to put in to get it started up - it was out of reach of small developers unfortunately.

You're not wrong. I was working for a large loan company here in the UK and managing their digital ad campaign. They were shelling out £50k a month for online advertising without a care in the world, but as soon as I showed them what it'd cost to get a good iAd campaign up and running their faces turned white.
 

DipDog3

macrumors 65816
Sep 20, 2002
1,190
691
Difference

Apple sells ads in order to provide money to developers, so they will create content for Apple products, which creates a diverse set of apps that are free or inexpensive that entices people to buy Apple products.

Google sells ads to make money for itself.
 

TouchMint.com

macrumors 68000
May 25, 2012
1,597
298
Phoenix
Not that i use ads in my apps but I hear there are tons of problems with iad and not many serious developers use it. I guess apple pays quite a bit less than the others and It only works in a few countries (maybe just usa)? Anyways sounds like they have a lot of catching up to do on the ad filling front hopefully this is a move in the right direction?
 

gotluck

macrumors 603
Dec 8, 2011
5,696
1,111
East Central Florida
Apple sells ads in order to provide money to developers, so they will create content for Apple products, which creates a diverse set of apps that are free or inexpensive that entices people to buy Apple products.

Google sells ads to make money for itself.

Lol it's all the same
 

kdarling

macrumors P6
Apple sells ads in order to provide money to developers, so they will create content for Apple products, which creates a diverse set of apps that are free or inexpensive that entices people to buy Apple products.

Google sells ads to make money for itself.

The trouble with your theory, is that Apple started out by giving LESS to developers than Google did. (60% vs 68%) And forced advertisers to commit to a million dollars buy-in, which led to far fewer advertisers.

In other words, Apple was ALL about the money.

After their greedy terms failed to attract longterm advertisers, Apple's was forced down to almost reasonable buy-in amounts, and to give developers 70%.
 

robjulo

Suspended
Jul 16, 2010
1,623
3,157
Apple sells ads in order to provide money to developers, so they will create content for Apple products, which creates a diverse set of apps that are free or inexpensive that entices people to buy Apple products.

Google sells ads to make money for itself.

Oh please.:rolleyes:
 

bzero

macrumors member
Apr 1, 2014
42
0
Apple sells ads in order to provide money to developers, so they will create content for Apple products, which creates a diverse set of apps that are free or inexpensive that entices people to buy Apple products.

Google sells ads to make money for itself.

They both sell ads to directly make money for themselves and to encourage developers to make apps. I don't know where you're getting your theory from.
 

Dave.UK

macrumors 65816
Sep 24, 2012
1,260
432
Kent, UK
Apple sells ads in order to provide money to developers, so they will create content for Apple products, which creates a diverse set of apps that are free or inexpensive that entices people to buy Apple products.

Google sells ads to make money for itself.

You keep telling yourself that ;)
 

Reason077

macrumors 68030
Aug 14, 2007
2,832
2,131
Not that i use ads in my apps but I hear there are tons of problems with iad and not many serious developers use it. I guess apple pays quite a bit less than the others and It only works in a few countries (maybe just usa)? Anyways sounds like they have a lot of catching up to do on the ad filling front hopefully this is a move in the right direction?

Your information is a few years out of date.

Most "serious" iOS developers do use iAd - although they combine it with other Ad networks using mediation networks. These tools/networks attempt automatically select the highest paying ads for a given user on a given day. Google's Ad network, AdMob, even supports iAd mediation now.

In my experience iAd pays the same, or somewhat better than, other networks in terms of banner ads. Game developers and the like can achieve higher eCPMs using full-screen interstitial ads, video ads, etc that iAd didn't support previously.

Fill rates are definitely not an issue with iAd anymore, particularly since last year when iAd workbench launched. I've noticed a general improvement in eCPM on iAd since workbench launched, too.

iAd is also very reliable, especially in the sense that they always pay you on time every month on 30 day terms - something that has been a big issue for some networks in the past.

Its true that iAd doesn't yet operate in all countries, but it works very well in those that it does. I believe the current list of countries supported is: United States, Canada, Mexico, United Kingdom, France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Japan, New Zealand, Australia, Ireland, Hong Kong, and Taiwan
 
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Tech198

macrumors P6
Mar 21, 2011
15,916
2,149
Australia, Perth
One thing's for sure: Apple now likes circles. A lot.

yep....

I don't really any ad... relevant or not, i don't click it..

Personally, if Apple really wanted to make money, they would work how how to just display the ad and get paid, rather than "you have to click" That's a instant downer right there.

You would get some, but not as much, because all people are trying to do is use the app that got, not to look at ads. if you want to click those, look on google.
 

Reason077

macrumors 68030
Aug 14, 2007
2,832
2,131
The trouble with your theory, is that Apple started out by giving LESS to developers than Google did. (60% vs 68%) And forced advertisers to commit to a million dollars buy-in, which led to far fewer advertisers.

In other words, Apple was ALL about the money.

"Forcing advertisers to commit millions" cost Apple a lot of money, not the other way around. With lower barriers to entry, they could have signed up far more advertisers in the early days of iAd than they did.

The reason for it was that they (Steve) wanted to create a perception of iAd being a premium ad network, with high quality advertisers designing high quality ads.

This was to differentiate iAd from others at the time, like AdMob, which were perceived as being in a race to the bottom: spammy apps full of spammy ads pushing crap.

Of course, it didn't work out as well as they hoped (in the early days), but I'm sure it was always part of the plan to gradually lower the entry bar, opening up iAd to more advertisers, and develop self-service tools (iAd workbench, iAd producer).
 

Rafterman

Contributor
Apr 23, 2010
3,829
3,948
Yeah, Apple, why worry about iOS 7.1's massive power drain problems, the people demand easier access to ads :rolleyes:
 
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