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Original poster
Apr 12, 2001
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Back in 2010, Apple debuted a volume purchase program for its iOS App Store, designed to allow educational institutions and businesses to purchase iOS apps in bulk. With Mavericks, the company is planning to expand its purchase program to the Mac App Store.

volumepurchase.jpg
The App Store Volume Purchase Program now offers institutions the ability to assign apps to users while keeping full ownership and control over app licenses. Institutions purchase app licenses through the VPP website, and can use their MDM solution to assign apps to students, faculty, and staff over the air. Students can enroll with their personal Apple IDs without providing it to their institution, and apps are placed in their purchase history for self-service download, or are installed automatically via MDM. Apps can be revoked at any time and reassigned to other students. In addition to iOS apps, VPP now also supports the purchase of Mac apps and even books, so students can be provided all the tools they need to get their work done.
As the release of Mavericks approaches, Apple sent an email to Mac developers (via 9to5Mac) with instructions on how to prep for the upcoming launch of Mac App Store volume purchases.
We're pleased to announce that Mac apps will soon be eligible to participate in the Volume Purchase Program for Business and Education. The Volume Purchase Program allows businesses or educational institutions to purchase multiple copies of your app at once.

You may also offer a discount to educational institutions for multiple purchases. If you choose to offer a volume discount for an app, institutions that purchase 20 or more copies of that app in a single order will receive a 50-percent discount.

Your existing Mac apps will not be automatically enrolled in the discount for educational institutions. If you would like to offer your existing Mac apps at a discount for the Educational Volume Purchase Program, check "Discount for Educational Institutions" in the Rights and Pricing section of the Manage Your Apps module on iTunes Connect.
Under the terms of the program, Mac developers will be able to implement educational discounts to bulk app purchases in iTunes Connect, allowing institutions that purchase 20 or more copies of an app to get a 50 percent discount. Previously, bulk purchases of Mac apps were not available, with the exception of Apple's own apps.

OS X 10.9 Mavericks is expected to launch at the end of October and includes a number of other features for education and enterprise users, including single sign on, Caching Server 2, and new MDM configuration options.

Article Link: Apple Notifies Developers About App Store Volume Purchase Program for Mac Apps
 

Manderby

macrumors 6502a
Nov 23, 2006
500
92
One of the main flaws of the Mac App Store finally comes to an end: Purchasing in high volume.

I'm confident that many companies and a lot! of educational institutions had neglected the Mac App Store because of this.

Already enrolled. It's a good thing.
 

tdmac

macrumors 6502
Feb 9, 2008
353
6
They are.

Taking 30% of something that sells for half as much is 50% less.
 

ArtOfWarfare

macrumors G3
Nov 26, 2007
9,437
5,827
I'm feeling rather split on this... how many organizations could possibly decide that $2/copy is too much but $1/copy is just right?
 

Parasprite

macrumors 68000
Mar 5, 2013
1,698
144
Why not make the discount customizable? It seems that the one size fits all is a bit heavy handed. 50% is a huge chunk. I'm wondering if Apple will cut their take to 50% of the total as well.

30% regardless. If your app costs $100 and Apple takes $30, then your App will cost $50 and Apple takes $15.

They are actually pretty consistent with this kind of stuff, which is probably why there is a "one size fits all" model being used in the first place.

----------

I'm feeling rather split on this... how many organizations could possibly decide that $2/copy is too much but $1/copy is just right?

[$39.99] is a lot for [1Password], but if for some reason a company wants to install it on 30 computers it could save $600. I doubt [1Password] minds the business either.

Remember, this is referring to the Mac app store, not the iOS one. There is much more potential for higher-cost apps.
 

ArtOfWarfare

macrumors G3
Nov 26, 2007
9,437
5,827
[$39.99] is a lot for [1Password], but if for some reason a company wants to install it on 30 computers it could save $600. I doubt [1Password] minds the business either.

Remember, this is referring to the Mac app store, not the iOS one. There is much more potential for higher-cost apps.

I'm talking about my app though. I've tried pricing it at $1, $2, and $3. I had roughly the same sales volume at $1 and $2, but volume was cut in half at $3 (so it was a lot less profitable because price less than doubled.) So I've kept it at $2 for the past 18 months or so.

I can't imagine organization care that much about spending saving $30 on 30 installs - I'm giving them a good deal no matter what. And the wages of the person making the decision while they work it out probably exceeds what they save.

I think I'll just stick with $2/copy for everyone, bulk sales or not.
 
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mgroover

macrumors newbie
Oct 3, 2013
21
6
I'm talking about my app though. I've tried pricing it at $1, $2, and $3. I had roughly the same sales volume at $1 and $2, but volume was cut in half at $3 (so it was a lot less profitable because price less than doubled.) So I've kept it at $2 for the past 18 months or so.

I can't imagine organization care that much about spending saving $30 on 30 installs - I'm giving them a good deal no matter what. And the wages of the person making the decision while they work it out probably exceeds what they save.

I think I'll just stick with $2/copy for everyone, bulk sales or not.

Hi,

I'm not a user of any Apple products, Android on the mobile side, Windows/Linux/BSD server side and Windows on client side, but I generally keep up with the news posted here and on other Mac sites.

I actually registered an account to respond to this argument as I think you are missing the enterprise aspect of it.

The likes of VPP through App Store is something all larger enterprises with central management has been asking for during an extended period. The reason is mainly not to cut costs on the purchase price, even though this is one of the main reason why you purchase in bulk volumes or enterprise licensing agreements, as the App Store is not aimed at all towards enterprise users.

It requires an Apple ID to purchase the software, an ID which can be connected to 5 >physical< machines, which needs to be connected to a credit card. What do you do if you have 500 devices requiring your software? Register 500 accounts and purchase the app 500 times?

I have not looked in to the actual details of the VPP yet but the possibility of configuring a machine with a generic corporate Apple ID is something which would be very beneficial.

Of course, when you have this large amount of devices the management is handled by other 3rd party apps such as FileWave, Puppet, OSCAR etc to manage both image installs, license inventory and app installs but just the actual time and hassle of purchasing a standalone installer of Final Cut X is mindblowing. Here in Sweden, the ONLY way of purchasing the app was through App Store.


I like the architecture behind OSX, just don't get along with the GUI at all. For Apple to get a sustaining share of the enterprise market they need to do what Microsoft has done historically, please the enterprise market with management tools and not be 100% user centric.

Knowing some people who work only with OSX-desktop deployment environments I know this would be god send. :)
 
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Amer.Dababneh

macrumors newbie
May 24, 2013
10
0
Question

So regarding the Apple Mac apps that were already purchased by an educational institution and distributed to (redeemed by) whom now are former employees (like Final Cut Pro X & Motion), can those apps be claimed back to that institution and get revoked from the employees' personal Apple IDs?
 
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Lostanddamned

macrumors 6502a
May 3, 2009
669
343
London, UK
I'm talking about my app though. I've tried pricing it at $1, $2, and $3. I had roughly the same sales volume at $1 and $2, but volume was cut in half at $3 (so it was a lot less profitable because price less than doubled.) So I've kept it at $2 for the past 18 months or so.

I can't imagine organization care that much about spending saving $30 on 30 installs - I'm giving them a good deal no matter what. And the wages of the person making the decision while they work it out probably exceeds what they save.

I think I'll just stick with $2/copy for everyone, bulk sales or not.

The fact is that whilst volume was the same for $1 as $2, this doesn't take into account the appeal that a discount can bring, especially for corporations looking to purchase a large number of licenses - for this example I'll say 50 machines. When they look at a $2 app, they see a potential cost of $100. If they see the opportunity for an expenditure of $50, it becomes far more appealing. For the individual user the difference between a $1 and $2 purchase is negligible so the volumes are the same. However, if a company sees that it is "saving" $50 by buying your app for all its machines, the usefulness becomes more apparent. They may not have planned on purchasing before, but the effect of "loyalty pricing" is to exploit human psychology into larger purchases than they initially planned. This would change the volume as previously recorded.

That said, I think this bulk purchasing is aimed more at people looking to buy the more expensive productivity apps such as 1password, Pages, Final Cut Pro, SQL managers and the like, rather than menubar tools that provide minor functions

----------

So regarding the Apple Mac apps that were already purchased by an educational institution and distributed to (redeemed by) whom now are former employees (like Final Cut Pro X & Motion), can those apps be claimed back to that institution and get revoked from the employees' personal Apple IDs?

It looks like it yes. Very handy for not having to give everyone who passes through your doors a copy of Final Cut for the rest of their life.

Apps can be revoked at any time and reassigned to other students.

removed personal attacks, its childish and I regret it
 
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ArtOfWarfare

macrumors G3
Nov 26, 2007
9,437
5,827
The fact is that whilst volume was the same for $1 as $2, this doesn't take into account the appeal that a discount can bring, especially for corporations looking to purchase a large number of licenses - for this example I'll say 50 machines. When they look at a $2 app, they see a potential cost of $100. If they see the opportunity for an expenditure of $50, it becomes far more appealing. For the individual user the difference between a $1 and $2 purchase is negligible so the volumes are the same. However, if a company sees that it is "saving" $50 by buying your app for all its machines, the usefulness becomes more apparent. They may not have planned on purchasing before, but the effect of "loyalty pricing" is to exploit human psychology into larger purchases than they initially planned. This would change the volume as previously recorded.

I see... I suppose I'll do it then, if you think I'll increase customer loyalty.
 
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guzhogi

macrumors 68040
Aug 31, 2003
3,634
1,648
Wherever my feet take me…
So regarding the Apple Mac apps that were already purchased by an educational institution and distributed to (redeemed by) whom now are former employees (like Final Cut Pro X & Motion), can those apps be claimed back to that institution and get revoked from the employees' personal Apple IDs?

I'd like that. Businesses and schools could save a lot of money that way.

Also wish there was a way for users to transfer purchases to another person. I've bought apps, songs, movies, etc. that I don't want any more, but are currently stuck on my Apple account. But this is for a different discussion.
 

Joe The Dragon

macrumors 6502a
Jul 26, 2006
905
282
One of the main flaws of the Mac App Store finally comes to an end: Purchasing in high volume.

I'm confident that many companies and a lot! of educational institutions had neglected the Mac App Store because of this.

Already enrolled. It's a good thing.

But app devs don't get any real pricing control so maybe not.
 
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