Apple Offers Disaster Relief Program for Apple Card Holders

MacRumors

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Apr 12, 2001
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The Apple Card comes with a Disaster Relief Program, according to a MacRumors reader who lives in Houston and recently experienced some flooding from tropical storm Imelda.

Apple sent MacRumors reader Frequeniquity an email suggesting that he apply for the program after Apple detected that he "may have been affected by a natural disaster."


Emails sent out by Apple, which were also received by another MacRumors reader, offer the following benefits:

[*]No interest for two months, starting with the month you enroll. After two months, your standard purchase APR will apply.
[*]You can skip the payment due in the month you enroll.
[*]If your account is in good standing, you will remain current while enrolled.
[*]If your account is past due, your account will not go further delinquent while enrolled. However, your account will remain paste due until you make all of your past due payments and your ability to make new purchases may continue to be restricted.

According to the email sent out to Apple Card users, those interested in applying for the Disaster Relief Program should contact an Apple Card Specialist after receiving an email.

Apple appears to be sending out these emails to customers who have addresses registered in areas where a natural disaster has occurred, and presumably this will be a benefit offered to all Apple Card users who are experiencing issues like floods, fires, earthquakes, and other issues.

Article Link: Apple Offers Disaster Relief Program for Apple Card Holders
 
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konqerror

macrumors 6502a
Dec 31, 2013
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This isn't anything special, honestly. All credit card companies, and banks, have some variation on this program. Typically the criteria is FEMA-declared disaster zone.

Some of it is required or sponsored by the government, e.g. mortgage deferrals through HUD. So it isn't merely a generous gesture.
 

btrach144

macrumors 68000
Aug 28, 2015
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Isn’t this almost like preying on those in a bad situation?

“Hey, load up our credit card with purchases because your life was just ruined. We won’t charge interest for the first two months!”

As someone else pointed out, this is not limited to Apple, but an industry standard. Just seems weird.
 

AppleWes

macrumors 6502
Oct 9, 2013
467
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Isn’t this almost like preying on those in a bad situation?

“Hey, load up our credit card with purchases because your life was just ruined. We won’t charge interest for the first two months!”
It's all how people take it though "glass half full/empty". If you have an ounce of personal responsibility you will know not to charge more than you can pay off, and can use programs like this to get back on feet with basic life items.
 

Analog Kid

macrumors 601
Mar 4, 2003
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MR could really provide a service by confirming this officially through Apple. Unless I missed something more solid, the article seems to take the emails at face value.

I, for one, wouldn't click on any links I got in an email like that...
 
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konqerror

macrumors 6502a
Dec 31, 2013
773
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Isn’t this almost like preying on those in a bad situation?

“Hey, load up our credit card with purchases because your life was just ruined. We won’t charge interest for the first two months!”
It allows responsible adults, the majority of credit card holders, to buy things to begin to recover their lives before the insurance check comes in. Otherwise, you're stuck for 2 months without clothes or other daily necessities. And some insurance, particularly replacement cost coverage, won't pay until after you buy the replacement. This is responsible use of credit.
 
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Khedron

macrumors 68000
Sep 27, 2013
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Apple trying to get free advertising for the fact that it meets the minimum industry standards

Why is this being done by email, isn't the app supposed to be a secure and convenient way to manage your account? Didn't they rethink everything about credit cards after all?
 
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Tubamajuba

macrumors 68020
Jun 8, 2011
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here
Apple trying to get free advertising for the fact that it meets the minimum industry standards

Why is this being done by email, isn't the app supposed to be a secure and convenient way to manage your account? Didn't they rethink everything about credit cards after all?
Did it say that the MacRumors reader who sent this image in was an Apple employee? If so, yeah, that's basically advertising. I must have missed that part though, because I see nothing indicating that Apple had anything to do with sending this story in to MacRumors.

And I'm sure you and some others would complain about email not being a contact option if Apple chose to do everything through the app.
 

citysnaps

macrumors 603
Oct 10, 2011
5,114
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San Francisco
Apple trying to get free advertising for the fact that it meets the minimum industry standards

Why is this being done by email, isn't the app supposed to be a secure and convenient way to manage your account? Didn't they rethink everything about credit cards after all?
Did Tim Cook tweet that or something?
 
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Lobwedgephil

macrumors 601
Apr 7, 2012
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MR could really provide a service by confirming this officially through Apple. Unless I missed something more solid, the article seems to take the emails at face value.

I, for one, wouldn't click on any links I got in an email like that...
It was from Apple.
 

Gutwrench

Contributor
Jan 2, 2011
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Um, good on Apple but while not required temporary debt relief is common in federally declared disaster areas.

It’s actually mandated on mortgages underwritten by Fannie, Freddie, FHA, and VA.
 
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Gutwrench

Contributor
Jan 2, 2011
3,889
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This isn't anything special, honestly. All credit card companies, and banks, have some variation on this program. Typically the criteria is FEMA-declared disaster zone.

Some of it is required or sponsored by the government, e.g. mortgage deferrals through HUD. So it isn't merely a generous gesture.
I didn’t see your post before adding mine. I agree with you.
 

Analog Kid

macrumors 601
Mar 4, 2003
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It was from Apple.
Then the article shouldn’t use language like “appears” or “according to the email”.

I get plenty of emails purporting to be from Apple explaining that there has been suspicious activity on my iCloud account and asking me to sign in and confirm my identity, none of which are real.

I get that MR isn’t a newspaper, but they could still reach out to the company for confirmation and comment...
 
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ryanwarsaw

macrumors 68030
Apr 7, 2007
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This isn't anything special, honestly. All credit card companies, and banks, have some variation on this program. Typically the criteria is FEMA-declared disaster zone.

Some of it is required or sponsored by the government, e.g. mortgage deferrals through HUD. So it isn't merely a generous gesture.
The difference that I can think of and it is a big one is this... When you are in a disaster area and you lose your home you are quite possibly never going to pay the mortgage again anyway. Apple offering this deal pays for a motel, or whatever you need in case you aren't moving back home