Apple Officially Obsoletes First MacBook Pro With a Retina Display

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macrumors bot
Original poster
Apr 12, 2001
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As expected, Apple's first MacBook Pro with a Retina display is now officially classed as "obsolete" worldwide, just over eight years after its release.


In a support document, Apple notes that obsolete products are no longer eligible for hardware service, with "no exceptions." This means that any mid-2012 Retina MacBook Pro 15-inch models still out there that require a battery or other repairs will no longer be accepted by Apple.

The only alternatives are to follow one of iFixit's many do-it-yourself repair guides, or to make enquiries at an independent repair shop, although many do not use official Apple parts.

When the MacBook Pro with Retina display was revealed at WWDC 2012, Apple marketing chief Phil Schiller called it "a breakthrough in display engineering" and claimed there had "never been a notebook this gorgeous."


Apart from being the first MacBook Pro to boast a Retina display, the 2012 model had a much slimmer design than previous models. This was made possible by Apple removing the built-in Ethernet port and optical disc drive for CDs/DVDs. It still featured pairs of Thunderbolt and USB-A ports, an HDMI port, and an SD card slot, however.

Article Link: Apple Officially Obsoletes First MacBook Pro With a Retina Display
 

itsmilo

macrumors 68040
Sep 15, 2016
3,383
7,344
Berlin, Germany
I have the late 2012 13inch one and it still runs great on Catalina. In fact, they had to replace the battery in 2013 and according to coconutbattery, my battery health is still at 93 % capacity (been using it mostly plugged in). I am not gonna replace it until it falls apart, i do not really need a laptop anymore. Shame Big Sur is no longer supported, i am sure it would run perfectly fine. Hoping for a hack with the official release
 

e1me5

macrumors 6502
Jun 11, 2013
337
646
Cyprus
I've been using its nonRetina counterpart for some days now as a backup until my 2018 gets fixed and I have to say, my God, its so powerful and smooth for an 8 year old computer.
 

nol2001

macrumors regular
Aug 15, 2013
117
128
UK
My 2012 15 inch rMBP which I bought on day 1 broke in March 2019 (I think the graphics).

I then bought a 2014 rMBP 15inch replacement which has been doing well.

I will hopefully by an ARM Mac next if it has 120fps display.
 

Brian Y

macrumors 68040
Oct 21, 2012
3,656
808
I loved this laptop. I got one back when I still worked for Apple on launch day. Unfortunately mine suffered from the GPU issue :(.

Still have a 2015 one with that design for work though. I'm trying to keep hold of it as long as possible, hopefully they'll let me skip the next upgrade cycle!
 

Darth Tulhu

macrumors 6502a
Apr 10, 2019
674
991
This was the beginning of the end of upgradeable Apple computing as we knew it.

The first soldered model, and although the SSD was not soldered in, it was proprietary (if I'm not mistaken), at least at the time.

For me, this is when the Mac died, and thus I entered the dark ages of Apple products where my yearly upgrade cycle ground to a screeching halt.

The next Apple purchase I made was the iPhone Xr (for the rest of my family) last year.

Its predecessor was the last Mac I ever bought (15" cMBP which is still in use today) and probably the last Mac I ever will.

An iPad will replace all my current machines. How times have changed!

EDIT: The first soldered model was the MBA, I believe... this was the first soldered MBP. :(
 

nwcs

macrumors 68000
Sep 21, 2009
1,871
2,441
Tennessee
Lol, I still remember all the griping people did about LG and Samsung displays. How this one looked more accurate or that one had burn in and where you could find the manufacturer ID. And all the complaints about the hinge, the cost, etc.

In other words, many of the same complaints issued today. But how many people are still using a windows laptop 8 years later?

Even my old MacBook Pro 2010 17” is running fine although it’s abandoned in support and can’t run the newest chrome, etc. The software support dies before the hardware more often than not.
 

AmazinApple

macrumors newbie
Dec 2, 2019
13
77
New York, NY
This was the beginning of the end of upgradeable Apple computing as we knew it.

The first soldered model, and although the SSD was not soldered in, it was proprietary (if I'm not mistaken), at least at the time.

For me, this is when the Mac died, and thus I entered the dark ages of Apple products where my yearly upgrade cycle ground to a screeching halt.

The next Apple purchase I made was the iPhone Xr (for the rest of my family) last year.

Its predecessor was the last Mac I ever bought (15" cMBP which is still in use today) and probably the last Mac I ever will.

An iPad will replace all my current machines. How times have changed!

EDIT: The first soldered model was the MBA, I believe... this was the first soldered MBP. :(
If you upgraded every year why did it matter if it didn't have upgradable memory or storage?

Also, the iPad doesn't have those things either. I'm not saying it's a good thing they got rid of it necessarily but I'm not sure why it would be such a deal breaker.
 

zapmymac

macrumors member
Aug 24, 2016
71
33
My early 2013 10,1 is still going strong as well. Also purchased 1st week it came out. One out of warranty repair happened 2 years ago: power plug connector and took out the main board. Cost $400 and threw in a new battery. Happy camper for another 2-4 years I’m sure. running Mojave happily; not sure I’ll switch to Catalina?
 
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