apple pay needs to be compatible with my bank?

al404

macrumors 6502
Original poster
Apr 24, 2011
440
21
Novara, Italy
I'm not really sure i got it right, because i thought that Apple Pay is like PayPal and all i have to do is to connect my credit card ( visa / mastercard ) but I try to do it iPhone says that my bank is not supported
 

LoveToMacRumors

macrumors 68020
Feb 15, 2015
2,410
2,011
Canada
I'm not really sure i got it right, because i thought that Apple Pay is like PayPal and all i have to do is to connect my credit card ( visa / mastercard ) but I try to do it iPhone says that my bank is not supported
You live in Italy?

Here's the list of banks that supports Apple Pay

Italy*


  • American Express
  • Banco Mediolanum
  • boon. by Wirecard
  • Carrefour Banca
  • UniCredit


* San Marino and Vatican City also support Apple Pay.
 

CTHarrryH

macrumors 68020
Jul 4, 2012
2,334
909
Banks need to approve and there is back end processing that they need to do - also, in the US, even if your bank approves in general, you need to contact them when you add.
 

al404

macrumors 6502
Original poster
Apr 24, 2011
440
21
Novara, Italy
ok thank, in italy there are only 5 but banks in that list are actually 2 and none of them is mine
it seems a pretty complicated process is not really in apple style, PayPal is way easier but as far as I know it will be connected to Samsung pay
 

ecschwarz

macrumors 65816
Jun 28, 2010
1,306
259
Not like PayPal at all - let me try to explain it in a sort of overview form. Basically what happens when you add a card is that Apple puts your device in contact with your bank and your bank generates a token (essentially a throwaway card number that is unique to your device). So, if your card was 1234 5678 9012 3456, your Apple Pay number on your phone may be 9876 5432 1012 3456 and on your watch may be 4321 0987 6556 0123 even though they all point to the same account. When you pay in person, in an app, or on the web with that device, the tokenized number is passed through the merchant and when it hits your bank, points back to your account.

In the case of a data breach or other fraud, the merchant only has the token number from your device, so your bank can issue a new one and the number on your physical card is not seen.

If you delete your card from your device, the token is destroyed, and if you re-add it, you'll get a different token number.

Android Pay uses tokenization, and I think Samsung Pay should, too, but I think those allow you to add unsupported cards as a copy. I think for this, Apple saw it as a better solution to work with banks to come on board, rather than allowing people to add cards without tokenization and the extra security benefits.

In the U.S., there's a lot of smaller banks and credit unions that have been late to the Apple Pay party, but are getting added. I suspect Apple will be working with more as time goes on (at launch, only the largest banks were part of Apple Pay and only 3 of the 4 major credit card types were supported).
 
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