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Defthand

macrumors 65816
Original poster
Sep 1, 2010
1,351
1,712
As if the iPhone 6s power management issue (a.k.a. “battery issue”) wasn’t bad enough, the new Battery Health feature is incompatible with aftermarket batteries. The symptoms that plagued the 6s and bricked some phones are continuing with aftermarket replacement batteries. Even worse, Apple’s self-serving policies deny affected customers the right to replace the aftermarket battery with an OEM one. This happened to me…

When the 6s’s power management issue and covert throttling was revealed, I was quick to apply for Apple’s discounted battery replacement offer. Unfortunately, battery supplies were initially scarce. Consequently, I opted to purchase and install a replacement battery from iFixit. My phone’s performance was restored to like new! I enjoyed the restoration until recently. The beta Battery Health feature in Settings wasn’t revealing any details about the battery. Instead, it instructed me to service the battery.

The battery assessment tool, Coco Battery, confirmed the battery was functioning properly. Nevertheless, I contacted Apple Support and they recommended a battery replacement with no further study of the cause.

I was working in another State when this occurred. My phone was a crucial necessity at the time. Unsurprisingly, the Eton, Ohio Apple Store’s response was stereotypically corporate. I was told they would literally not touch non-OEM batteries because aftermarket batteries posed a safety risk. Fine. I offered to remove the “scary” battery myself.

Unbelievably, they refused to install a replacement battery unless they remove and collect one. Remember, this is not a warranty repair they are performing. I am paying them for the service. Yet they are supposedly unequipped to safely service lithium batteries other than their own. The Kool-aid infused genius insisted Apple batteries were vetted.

I asked a manager how I’m supposed to fix my phone in spite of their Catch 22’s. Her suggestion: purchase a phone case with a built-in auxiliary battery or use a portable battery charger to power the ph9ne! Idiot. I asked to speak with someone reasonable since she was useless.

Grasping for a solution, I asked if they would sell me a battery to install myself. Nope. Yet another self-serving policy prevents them.

Unable to reason with the smug jerks, I asked if they could roll back my phone’s OS to an earlier public release. They agreed to this, but the same Battery Health feature was present and by the next day my phone was terminal.

I’m rooting for the Plaintiffs in the numerous suits pending against Apple. I’m rooting for the consumers who want Right to Repair laws. Incidentally, iFixit acknowledged that the power management features in iOS exclude aftermarket batteries and are causing unnecessary trouble for their customers. They offered to refund me the battery’s cost. It’s revealing when a modest company is more empathetic and accommodating than a giant company with unlimited resources.
 

Funsize93

macrumors regular
May 23, 2018
111
64
Australia
Dont blame Apple for your own ignorance. You knew the risks of accepting a third party repair thus voiding your warranty and right of repair especially with someone as sensitive as a safety issue. This is stated in the Terms of conditions, the terms of conditions you agreed to when purchasing your product. Yes Apple come clean and admitted to a mistake, they then tried to provide the best customer service by offering the battery replacement program, something they didnt have to do. But they did anyway as they wanted their customers to still enjoying using their products. Please tell me when other companies have done something similar to mend their relationship with their customers? The battery repair program was in such high demand that there was a period of time when there were a shortage. Up to a week max was the wait period and if it was longer you would have been contacted for when it was ready. You phone would still have been fine, all you had to do was wait. But in the end you had no patience and accepted the risks of a third party modification. You made your bed, now lay in it.
 

simonmet

Cancelled
Sep 9, 2012
2,666
3,663
Sydney
Dont blame Apple for your own ignorance. You knew the risks of accepting a third party repair thus voiding your warranty and right of repair especially with someone as sensitive as a safety issue. This is stated in the Terms of conditions, the terms of conditions you agreed to when purchasing your product. Yes Apple come clean and admitted to a mistake, they then tried to provide the best customer service by offering the battery replacement program, something they didnt have to do. But they did anyway as they wanted their customers to still enjoying using their products. Please tell me when other companies have done something similar to mend their relationship with their customers? The battery repair program was in such high demand that there was a period of time when there were a shortage. Up to a week max was the wait period and if it was longer you would have been contacted for when it was ready. You phone would still have been fine, all you had to do was wait. But in the end you had no patience and accepted the risks of a third party modification. You made your bed, now lay in it.

I don't understand how people get off on defending a trillion dollar corporation against ordinary individuals in such ridiculous circumstances such as this. And just because Apple says something in its Terms and Conditions it doesn't necessarily make it legal and it certainly doesn't necessarily make it morally just. This is why Apple runs into problems with regulators all the time, including our own ACCC with the Error 53 issue.

Bottom line is, Apple makes decisions solely to benefit themselves and these don't always align with or are friendly towards the customer. Apple are intent on controlling the repair and servicing market because it's how they exert significant economic pressure on users to upgrade, as in this very instance. Nobody said a user shouldn't accept the added risk in going with an aftermarket repair or replacement part, but to deny that user any further servicing or support, even for completely unrelated matters (at their own expense mind you), is not only probably illegal in some jurisdictions, it's bad for the environment and just but just basically an a***hole thing to do!
 
Last edited:

apolloa

Suspended
Oct 21, 2008
12,318
7,802
Time, because it rules EVERYTHING!
I told my brother in law about how this happens and of course he rubbished the thought, confidently stating ‘no it does not’, I can get a battery for £20 by my mate in his shop....

It shows that many do NOT know the risks of third party batteries, Apple certainly won’t tell you beforehand.

Perhaps the best solution to this case would be to remove the battery and then try another Apple store?
 

Funsize93

macrumors regular
May 23, 2018
111
64
Australia
I don't understand how people get off on defending a trillion dollar corporation against ordinary individuals in such ridiculous circumstances such as this. And just because Apple says something in its Terms and Conditions it doesn't necessarily make it legal and it certainly doesn't necessarily make it morally just. This is why Apple runs into problems with regulators all the time, including our own ACCC with the Error 53 issue.

Bottom line is Apple makes decisions solely to benefit themselves and these don't always align with or are friendly towards the customer. Apple are intent on controlling the repair and servicing market because it's how they exert significant economic pressure on users to upgrade, as in this very instance. Nobody said a user shouldn't accept the added risk in going with an aftermarket repair or replacement part, but to deny that user any further servicing or support, even for completely unrelated matters, is not only possibly illegal in some jurisdictions but just basically an a***hole thing to do!

Im not defending Apple at all. Im defending the moral principle that someone should not be put into harms way, a persons safety is far more important. The only reason Apple is denying service is because of a safety hazard, Apple performs service for other devices who have had 3rd-party mods such as a third-party screen replacements perfectly fine. A third party battery replacement is where Apple draws the line.

Do you think it is morally right that a genius member and others around to be put at risk of a safety hazard due to the unknown nature of the hazardous chemistry and build of a third party battery. A third-party battery which may not have gone through the same engineering and manufacturing standards to ensure the integrity of the vital part. I believe that individual has the right to deny service if they are concerned about their own health and wellbeing.
 
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simonmet

Cancelled
Sep 9, 2012
2,666
3,663
Sydney
Im not defending Apple at all. Im defending the moral principle that someone should not be put into harms way, a persons safety is far more important. The only reason Apple is denying service is because of a safety hazard, Apple performs service for other devices who have had 3rd-party mods such as a third-party screen replacements perfectly fine. A third party battery replacement is where Apple draws the line.

Do you think it is morally right that a genius member and others around to be put at risk of a safety hazard due to the unknown nature of the hazardous chemistry and build of a third party battery. A third-party battery which may not have gone through the same engineering and manufacturing standards to ensure the integrity of the vital part. I believe that individual has the right to deny service if they are concerned about their own health and wellbeing.

The OP said that they offered to remove the battery and probably to not even enter the shop with it, yet Apple refused to sell them one. Have a think about that for a second; Apple refuses to sell the customer service and parts at any cost; presumably because they want to own either the significant markup on their own servicing and parts (while simultaneously denying it); or make the customer buy a new phone so the cycle starts all over again. There's no safety issue here. Have a think too about the kind of logic and reasoning behind this. There's a reason Apple is a trillion dollar company and it's not because they have a squeaky-clean 'do no evil' approach to everything.
 
Last edited:

Zxxv

macrumors 68040
Nov 13, 2011
3,558
1,104
UK
Aftermarket batteries are not compatible with Apple iPhones

There fixed it for you.

If manufacturers dont want to provide upto spec batteries dont blame Apple.
 

Funsize93

macrumors regular
May 23, 2018
111
64
Australia
The OP said that they offered to remove the battery and probably to not even enter the shop with it, yet Apple refused to sell them one. Have a think about that for a second; Apple refuses to sell the customer service and parts at any cost; presumably because they want to own either the significant markup on their own servicing and parts (while simultaneously denying it); or make the customer buy a new phone so the cycle starts all over again. There's no safety issue here. Have a think too about the kind of logic and reasoning behind this. There's a reason Apple is a trillion dollar company and it's not because they have a squeaky-clean 'do no evil' approach to everything.

This is where we need clarity. I would side with the stores decision if the customer removed the battery themselves but upon inspection there were bent connector pins or damage inside the casing due to the 3rd-party modification - which could lead to future failures if the store proceeded with the repair. Due to that risk they would say the device is un-repairable as Apple would not want to be held responsible for future issues caused by damage from a third-party part or incorrect service. Straight up they will say no, generally in this scenario the store would offer a full OOW fee for a unit replacement.
 

KrisseFI

macrumors newbie
Aug 28, 2018
17
6
Finland
This is my first post and I'm from Finland so excuse my English.
I had my iPhone 6s plus battery replaced with aftermarket one and battery health showed 67% capasity and service battery with the new battery. Battery lasted about 6-7 hours mixed use so I figured out that something is wrong with new battery. So I went back to the store and they replaced battery once again. With the second battery, battery health shows right information, 100% battery capacity and battery life is very good, I usually have 50% battery left when I go to sleep (about 7 hours in use time).
I really don't know what went wrong with the first battery, coconut showed right information but phone didn't and battery lifetime was terrible. Is it that the phone didn't recognized battery right or was the battery damaged in some way ?
The second one has actually 3000mAh capacity , so its larger that apple original and battery lifetime is very good for my use. Of course my phone got little heavier with new larger battery, about 10g more.
 

Piggie

macrumors G3
Feb 23, 2010
8,830
3,498
What if an aftermarket battery is of a higher quality than the original.
I'm sure most here are intelligent enough to understand that Apple has it's own standards that the battery supplier must stick to, and this price Apple wishes to pay is as cut throat as anything.

It would be totally possible to make a battery of a higher quality of course.
Would such a battery still be no good in an iPhone?
 

Defthand

macrumors 65816
Original poster
Sep 1, 2010
1,351
1,712
After market batteries are a bad idea. You get what you pay for.

Generally speaking, that may be the case, but iFixit has a solid reputation for selling quality replacement parts. iFixit is very knowledgeable about the bones in Apple products. In fact, their product teardowns and opinions are routinely reported on by MacRumors.

iFixit encourages customers to lobby their State legislators for Right to Repair laws. Such laws would force manufacturers to allow third parties to offer OEM parts.

Aftermarket batteries are not compatible with Apple iPhones. There fixed it for you. If manufacturers dont want to provide upto spec batteries dont blame Apple.

On the contrary, my aftermarket battery performed flawlessly until Apple introduced a software feature that intentionally ignores non-OEM batteries. iFixit has been selling aftermarket batteries for years for all makes of phones. Other brands works with aftermarket batteries. Therefore, it’s Apple whose phones are now incompatible.
[doublepost=1535503146][/doublepost]
Im not defending Apple at all. Im defending the moral principle that someone should not be put into harms way, a persons safety is far more important. The only reason Apple is denying service is because of a safety hazard, Apple performs service for other devices who have had 3rd-party mods such as a third-party screen replacements perfectly fine. A third party battery replacement is where Apple draws the line.

Do you think it is morally right that a genius member and others around to be put at risk of a safety hazard due to the unknown nature of the hazardous chemistry and build of a third party battery. A third-party battery which may not have gone through the same engineering and manufacturing standards to ensure the integrity of the vital part. I believe that individual has the right to deny service if they are concerned about their own health and wellbeing.

Lithium batteries typically display symptoms when they are on the verge of failing catastrophically. They overheat or expand. Otherwise, you can assume the battery is safe to handle. If that wasn’t the case, millions of phone users would be holding potential bombs to their head.

There is no evidence that Apple’s batteries are more safe than others. I have had two Apple laptop batteries swell while charging. In fact, the genius commented that he had personally seen batteries spontaneously combust while being serviced. Since Apple doesn’t touch non-OEM batteries, guess whose batteries he was describing. So yes, Apple actually allows their techs to perform a hazardous task, but I imagine they have adequate safeguards. Those same safeguards should be adequate for any brand of battery.
[doublepost=1535503579][/doublepost]
This is where we need clarity. I would side with the stores decision if the customer removed the battery themselves but upon inspection there were bent connector pins or damage inside the casing due to the 3rd-party modification - which could lead to future failures if the store proceeded with the repair. Due to that risk they would say the device is un-repairable as Apple would not want to be held responsible for future issues caused by damage from a third-party part or incorrect service. Straight up they will say no, generally in this scenario the store would offer a full OOW fee for a unit replacement.

I offered to remove the aftermarket battery myself, sparing Apple any risk. It would have been reasonable if they couldn’t guarantee the new battery or if they damaged the phone while trying. My phone had long exceeded it’s warranty coverage, yet they erroneously treated my post-warranty maintenance as a warranty issue.
 

ftaok

macrumors 603
Jan 23, 2002
6,466
1,553
East Coast
Generally speaking, that may be the case, but iFixit has a solid reputation for selling quality replacement parts. iFixit is very knowledgeable about the bones in Apple products. In fact, their product teardowns and opinions are routinely reported on by MacRumors.

iFixit encourages customers to lobby their State legislators for Right to Repair laws. Such laws would force manufacturers to allow third parties to offer OEM parts.



On the contrary, my aftermarket battery performed flawlessly until Apple introduced a software feature that intentionally ignores non-OEM batteries. iFixit has been selling aftermarket batteries for years for all makes of phones. Other brands works with aftermarket batteries. Therefore, it’s Apple whose phones are now incompatible.
[doublepost=1535503146][/doublepost]

Lithium batteries typically display symptoms when they are on the verge of failing catastrophically. They overheat or expand. Otherwise, you can assume the battery is safe to handle. If that wasn’t the case, millions of phone users would be holding potential bombs to their head.

There is no evidence that Apple’s batteries are more safe than others. I have had two Apple laptop batteries swell while charging. In fact, the genius commented that he had personally seen batteries spontaneously combust while being serviced. Since Apple doesn’t touch non-OEM batteries, guess whose batteries he was describing. So yes, Apple actually allows their techs to perform a hazardous task, but I imagine they have adequate safeguards. Those same safeguards should be adequate for any brand of battery.
[doublepost=1535503579][/doublepost]

I offered to remove the aftermarket battery myself, sparing Apple any risk. It would have been reasonable if they couldn’t guarantee the new battery or if they damaged the phone while trying. My phone had long exceeded it’s warranty coverage, yet they erroneously treated my post-warranty maintenance as a warranty issue.
Perhaps you can find a dead iphone6 for free (or cheap) and grab the OEM battery out of it and put it in your iPhone.

Then go to the Apple Store for a replacement.
 
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mtneer

macrumors 68040
Sep 15, 2012
3,178
2,712
Perhaps you can find a dead iphone6 for free (or cheap) and grab the OEM battery out of it and put it in your iPhone.

Then go to the Apple Store for a replacement.

This for the win. Buy an case damaged/ terminally cracked iPhone on Swappa or somewhere with an OEM battery in it. Since you've become somewhat handy in managing to place and replace batteries by now, put that one in your phone and off you go to the Apple Store?
 

KishanKissoon

macrumors newbie
Apr 20, 2018
22
20
I have installed my own battery in the iphone 6s from one i got on ebay, works absolutely perfect, probably better than the original. paid like 10$ at the time, installed it in december 2017 and up till now its going strong.
 
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