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Coinciding with the launch of its public bug bounty program, Apple today published its new Apple Platform Security guide, offering users details about the security technology and features that are implemented within Apple platforms - including sections on Mac for the first time.

apple-platform-security-site.jpg

The documentation has been updated to reflect changes in iOS 13.3, iPadOS 13.3, macOS 10.15.2, tvOS 13.3, and watchOS 6.1.1. The Apple Platform Security site also covers hardware and services, providing comprehensive information in a readable format on the following topics:
  • Hardware Security and Biometrics: The hardware that forms the foundation for security on Apple devices, including the Secure Enclave, a dedicated AES crypto engine, Touch ID, and Face ID.
  • System Security: The integrated hardware and software functions that provide for the safe boot, update, and ongoing operation of Apple operating systems.
  • Encryption and Data Protection: The architecture and design that protects user data if the device is lost or stolen, or if an unauthorized person attempts to use or modify it.
  • App Security: The software and services that provide a safe app ecosystem and enable apps to run securely and without compromising platform integrity.
  • Services Security: Apple's services for identification, password management, payments, communications, and finding lost devices.
  • Network Security: Industry-standard networking protocols that provide secure authentication and encryption of data in transmission.
  • Developer Kits: Frameworks for secure and private management of home and health, as well as extension of Apple device and service capabilities to third-party apps.
  • Secure Device Management: Methods that allow management of Apple devices, prevent unauthorized use, and enable remote wipe if a device is lost or stolen.
  • Security Certifications and Programs: Information on ISO certifications, Cryptographic validation, Common Criteria Certification, and the Commercial Solutions for Classified (CSfC) Program.
The site can be browsed from the Table of Contents at the top of the page, or a PDF of the documentation can be downloaded here.

Alongside its Platform Security site, Apple maintains a separate site covering the company's approach to privacy, privacy controls on Apple devices, and the Apple privacy policy.

If users believe they have discovered a security or privacy vulnerability that affects Apple devices, software, services, or web servers, Apple encourages them to report it by sending an email to product-security@apple.com along with any relevant videos, crash logs, and system diagnosis reports. More information on reporting a security or privacy vulnerability can be found here.

Article Link: Apple Publishes New Apple Platform Security Guide
 

madmin

macrumors 6502
Jun 14, 2012
299
917
This is very welcome, but unfortunately is an exception to the usual lack of decent, up to date documentation coming from Apple in recent years.
 
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Puppuccino

macrumors 6502
Sep 24, 2019
439
413
It's great that it exists, but clear communications from Apple regarding bugs need to be established. I don't expect a heartfelt letter of thanks when I submit bugs, but something more than them sitting in a list without any kind of status indication puts me off.

Apple is great at marketing but their 'PR' is non-existent.

They need to talk more.
 

sdf

macrumors 6502
Jan 29, 2004
440
373
I don't expect a heartfelt letter of thanks when I submit bugs, but something more than them sitting in a list without any kind of status indication puts me off.

I totally agree with this. I've reported two vulnerabilities to them in the past. Both times they credited me, but neither time did they acknowledge receipt of the bug, the vulnerability, that they had figured it out, or that they were going to fix it until just before the public release of the fix when they asked me how I wanted to be credited.

That was several weeks (months in one case) of stress worrying if I'd really got it in front of them in a way that they understood it.

Apple is great at marketing but their 'PR' is non-existent.

Not sure what this is, but PR is definitely the wrong word for it. Maybe Developer Relations?
 
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Passingby

Suspended
Dec 17, 2019
115
164
Shame the T2 ship has caused so many stability and audio problems for MacBook Pro users. The chip should have been a security chip only instead of trying to do everything.
 
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dantroline

macrumors 6502
Oct 28, 2016
366
495
Shame the T2 ship has caused so many stability and audio problems for MacBook Pro users. The chip should have been a security chip only instead of trying to do everything.
I can imagine that it kind of has to be all-encompasing, partly in order to be effective (the security module has to have hypervisor access from Apple's point of view), and partly to comply with whatever unpublished policy Apple has decided to comply with since the death of Steve Jobs. That's the nicest way I can think of putting it. Intel already has TPM and related stuff for 10 years or so, perhaps Apple is supplanting this functionality with its own.

I really hope that open source hardware becomes a mainstream "thing" soon.
 

brian3uk

macrumors 6502
Sep 15, 2016
339
1,180
Now if only they would add FIDO hardware key support for Apple ID. (unless they do already, then please inform me)
 

paulcons

macrumors regular
Apr 3, 2017
152
86
New York City
How about making a small hardware device that is an external fingerprint sensor AND allow its use on almost any Mac running ANY macOS?
 
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