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Apple Releases iMovie 8.0.5, Adding Support for New iFrame Video Format

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Apple today released iMovie 8.0.5, bringing several compatibility improvements and bug fixes to the company's consumer-level video editing application.
This update improves compatibility with a number of devices and fixes other minor issues, including:

- Improved compatibility with camcorders using the iFrame video format
- Improved compatibility with importing video captured on the iPod nano
- Fixed problems with resizing the iMovie window during playback

CNET offers additional detail on the new iFrame video format for which support is included in the update, noting that it brings smaller file sizes and faster importing speeds, as well as simplifying editing of footage.

Dubbed iFrame, the new video format is based on industry standard technologies like H.264 video and AAC audio. As expected with H.264, iFrame produces much smaller file sizes than traditional video formats, while maintaining its high-quality video. Of course, the smaller file size increases import speed and helps with editing video files.

The iFrame format, developed by Apple, is currently limited to two Sanyo camera models unveiled earlier today.

iFrame is a computer-friendly video format that has been specifically designed to simplify the process of working with video recorded from a camera. With iFrame, the video recorded in the camera is in the same format that will be used for editing, which means that importing video is fast and file sizes are small. This translates to quick and easy editing and sharing of movies across multiple platforms and devices. This new format can also be used with both Mac and PC compatible applications due to the use of standards-based technologies such as H.264, AAC, MP4 and MOV.

iMovie 8.0.5 weighs in at 35.56 MB and requires OS X 10.5.6 or later.

Article Link: Apple Releases iMovie 8.0.5
 

The Samurai

macrumors 68020
Dec 29, 2007
2,031
657
Glasgow
Nice. About to test it out.

I really hope it adds support for USB cameras in the 'import from camera' option.
 
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DipDog3

macrumors 65816
Sep 20, 2002
1,184
679
Not to be confused with iframe, the HTML tag.

Come on Apple, couldn't this be called something else?
 
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daxomni

macrumors 6502
Jun 24, 2009
453
0
I've never once used iMovie because it doesn't support any video files I've ever tried to load. Does this update change any of that?
 
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The Samurai

macrumors 68020
Dec 29, 2007
2,031
657
Glasgow
So you have one of the only two Sanyo cameras that support it?

I was referring to the video capture, currently it only supports the iSight camera. I would like if they supported Logitech webcams etc. Cause at the moment, I have to use PhotoBooth and then import it in iMovie. It would be good to do everything from the one app.
 
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zweigand

macrumors 6502a
Oct 19, 2003
597
34
Can I convert DV footage into iFrame? I know it says 940 x 540 in the article, but I'm assuming that is what those cameras shoot at, not what the format is limited to.

I've been looking for a new format that I can compress my DV footage to that is editable directly in iMovie.
 
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thedarkhorse

macrumors 6502a
Sep 13, 2007
662
0
Canada
If iFrame video format = 960 x 540, then color me unimpressed.

from the looks of that sanyo news release that looks like it's the case and only at 30fps. If you want 1080p and 60fps you need to use the other format which they don't have any info about. Which is probably AVCHD and needs transcoding like the rest.
 
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larrylaffer

macrumors 6502a
Aug 1, 2009
601
740
Los Angeles
Not to be confused with iframe, the HTML tag.

Come on Apple, couldn't this be called something else?

You think that's bad? MPEG video is defined in terms of i-frames, b-frames, and p-frames. This is going to cause market confusion in the pro-video market. Thanks a bunch Steve!
 
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daxomni

macrumors 6502
Jun 24, 2009
453
0
Could you be any more vague?
I could always try. Literally any video file I've ever tried to load, including a dozen formats and various containers, cannot be read or edited. Then again I'm not following the one true path Apple envisioned when they created iMovie, so I guess I should just uninstall it if I'm not going to import raw trip videos to annoy my kids.

This [change in consumer-focused iMovie] is going to cause market confusion in the pro-video market.
You lost me.
 
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dasmb

macrumors 6502
Jul 12, 2007
279
162
I could always try. Literally any video file I've ever tried to load, including a dozen formats and various containers, cannot be read or edited. Then again I'm not following the one true path Apple envisioned when they created iMovie, so I guess I should just uninstall it if I'm not going to import raw trip videos to annoy my kids.
Are you sure you were loading them correctly? So far as I've been able to tell, the only requirement for loading content into iMovie is that Quicktime be able to read the format. I know I've used MPEG-2, MJPEG and various flavors of MP4 video codecs, with various MPEG and PCM audio streams, within mpeg and mov containers, and with file sizes between 320x240 and 1080p.

However, you do have to follow a special procedure to get your movie loaded into iMovie, which wants to organize its own sort of a half assed library of your media (I think this is in part so you can't absent mindedly move the source and thus bork the program). Thus not all portions of the application are drag and drop from outside the program -- the project library might be, but the project itself is not. Even if the video is already on your hard drive, you need to import it into the library.

As for causing confusion in the market -- you're talking about a segment in which "MPEG" can mean one of four transport formats, one of a half dozen audio formats and one of a full dozen video formats. iFrame might be a silly name but it's no sillier than .H264, Bink or Cinepak.
 
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thejadedmonkey

macrumors G3
May 28, 2005
8,329
1,382
Pennsylvania
What is Apple smoking, creating a format called iFrame. I happen to have worked with iframes back in the day, and when you're talking about a website supporting iframes, well... ;)

P.S. When I import my .mov files from my camera into iMovie, iMovie doesn't use them to edit... or did Apple just create a solution to a problem that didn't exist (while simultaneously creating a problem)
 
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celtikmind

macrumors 6502
Feb 9, 2009
436
0
iFrame - because we really need another video-format on top of the gazillion other variations/combinations we already have. :rolleyes:
 
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nutmac

macrumors 601
Mar 30, 2004
4,806
3,385
If you are going to go all out and create a new editing friendly format (iFrame), why limit to 960x540 (30 fps)?
 
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madwolf

macrumors member
Oct 11, 2009
73
0
So they're selling overpriced computers and don't support AVCHD just because they don't want to pay licensing fees? Instead they give us iFrame? AVCHD is supported by most consumer HD camcorders, iFrame by just two... great...
 
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Chundles

macrumors G4
Jul 4, 2005
11,986
432
So they're selling overpriced computers and don't support AVCHD just because they don't want to pay licensing fees? Instead they give us iFrame? AVCHD is supported by most consumer HD camcorders, iFrame by just two... great...

They do support AVCHD.
 
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dasmb

macrumors 6502
Jul 12, 2007
279
162
iFrame - because we really need another video-format on top of the gazillion other variations/combinations we already have. :rolleyes:

Please, then, enlighten us. What's another file format designed to support in-place editing of lossilly compressed high resolution video, with such features as random frame access and tight audio synchronization?
 
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