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macrumors bot
Original poster
Apr 12, 2001
55,464
17,803



Apple just released Java for OS X 2012-003, an update to the Java implementation in OS X. The update removes "the most common variants of the Flashback malware." Interestingly the update disables the automatic execution of Java applets, and, if automatic execution is re-enabled, will again disable it if no applets have been run for "an extended period of time".

It was reported earlier this week that Apple was in the process of creating software to remove Flashback. It's been claimed that the Flashback malware infected more than 600,000 Macs at its peak, though there have been a number of programs created to quickly and easily cleanse infected machines.

javaupdate.png


This Java security update removes the most common variants of the Flashback malware.

This update also configures the Java web plug-in to disable the automatic execution of Java applets. Users may re-enable automatic execution of Java applets using the Java Preferences application. If the Java web plug-in detects that no applets have been run for an extended period of time it will again disable Java applets.

This update is recommended for all Mac users with Java installed.

For details about this update see: http://support.apple.com/kb/HT5242
The update can be downloaded via Software Update. A separate Java for Mac OS X 10.6 Update 8 is available for users on Mac OS X Snow Leopard.

Article Link: Apple Releases Java Update to Remove Flashback Malware
 

jackhdev

macrumors 6502
Apr 9, 2011
343
0
Bismarck, North Dakota
I thought that apple didnt get virus?

All computers are susceptible to viruses... even iOS devices. Macs don't get as many viruses because Windows is more "popular" and is used in huge corporations, where information is very valuable. Hackers target them. Apple does try hard to keep OS X virus free though, including adding in an automatically updating safe list for some virus that was causing problems last year.
 
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alphaod

macrumors Core
Feb 9, 2008
22,181
1,234
NYC
Even though none of the machines I know of are infected, this is still good to download and an run.
 

SMOHKK85

macrumors newbie
Jul 22, 2011
12
1
Finally

Finally A solution to this Flashback. Although i don't have it, Im glad my Mac Community is protected from these Things!
:D

Macbook Pro 17" 2.4ghz 120SSD/ Macbook Pro 15" 2.4ghz 750HD/ Iphone 4s
Apple Tv/ Ipad 2 :apple::apple::apple:
 

toronado455

macrumors regular
Apr 2, 2009
193
10
This Java security update removes the most common variants of the Flashback malware.

So does that mean we still need to run the previous update in order to patch Java? What if your computer is NOT infected? What does this update do in that case? Does this update exist for users of earlier versions of OSX such as Tiger?
 

adamw

macrumors 6502
Sep 22, 2006
467
746
I got this trojan through the Java vulnerability. It infected my Mac Pro. I was not aware of it until I read the news stories about it last week. I removed it, and found parts of it had infected two other files on my Mac. Thanks to Little Snitch that was recommended to me after I was infected, which found these variants still "lurking."

I am glad to have gotten rid of it... I will install this update just to be sure it is all gone.
 

nelmat

macrumors 6502a
Jul 10, 2008
798
58
I thought that apple didnt get virus?

This isn't a virus. And it's estimated that less than one percent of macs that had the trojan. The OS was in no way affected, it relates to third party software which is being dropped by Apple.
 

coolfactor

macrumors 603
Jul 29, 2002
5,302
5,817
Vancouver, BC
All computers are susceptible to viruses... even iOS devices. Macs don't get as many viruses because Windows is more "popular" and is used in huge corporations, where information is very valuable. Apple does try hard to keep OS X virus free though, including adding in an automatically updating safe list for some virus that was causing problems last year.

Is Flashback a virus? It's malware, but is it a self-propagating virus? And it's not true that Macs have fewer viruses because Windows is "more popular". OS X is inherently more secure, but as Flashback proves, it's not 100% bulletproof. But as Apple has proven with this update, the good design of OS X allows them to protect users, even after an incident arises.
 

coder12

macrumors 6502a
Jun 28, 2010
512
3
All computers are susceptible to viruses... even iOS devices. Macs don't get as many viruses because Windows is more "popular" and is used in huge corporations, where information is very valuable. Apple does try hard to keep OS X virus free though, including adding in an automatically updating safe list for some virus that was causing problems last year.

While you are partially correct, you are also wrong. You see, UNIX is protected by magical fairies and it inherently makes me post things when my body is compromised by sleep-loss.

There is a member here with a link to a page explaining the entire detailed information in their signature here on MR. Anyone who can post that link here would be my hero.
 
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coolfactor

macrumors 603
Jul 29, 2002
5,302
5,817
Vancouver, BC
So does that mean we still need to run the previous update in order to patch Java? What if your computer is NOT infected? What does this update do in that case? Does this update exist for users of earlier versions of OSX such as Tiger?

It's generally recommended to install all updates that become available. Letting a system fall behind on updates is only asking for trouble.
 

Codyak

macrumors 6502
Apr 6, 2012
370
127
DC
Is Flashback a virus? It's malware, but is it a self-propagating virus? And it's not true that Macs have fewer viruses because Windows is "more popular". OS X is inherently more secure, but as Flashback proves, it's not 100% bulletproof. But as Apple has proven with this update, the good design of OS X allows them to protect users, even after an incident arises.

It's both popularity AND inherent security. :rolleyes:
 

bassanoclapper

macrumors 6502
Mar 4, 2008
294
122
London
This isn't a virus. And it's estimated that less than one percent of macs that had the trojan. The OS was in no way affected, it relates to third party software which is being dropped by Apple.

1% is large for penetration of malware/Trojan type nasties. The most widespread attack for PCs is around this level

When the story grew large, Apple acted quickly but they should have done so when they were alerted that the vulnerability existed some months ago

It has been reported that just having ClamXav or similar installed was enough for the malware to delete itself if it was downloaded. It's the only protection I currently use and mainly for downloads
 
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