Apple Releases macOS Catalina 10.15.6 Supplemental Update With Virtualization Bug Fix

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Apr 12, 2001
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Apple today released a supplemental update for macOS Catalina 10.15.6, with the update coming a month after the original launch of macOS Catalina 10.15.6.


The ‌‌macOS Catalina‌‌ 10.15.6 Supplemental Update can be downloaded from the Mac App Store using the Update feature in the System Preferences app.

According to Apple's release notes, the update fixes a problem that could cause virtualization apps like VMware to crash. It also fixes an issue that could cause the 2020 iMac to appear washed out after waking from sleep. Apple's full release notes are below:
macOS Catalina 10.15.6 supplemental update includes bug fixes for your Mac.

- Fixes a stability issue that could occur when running virtualization apps
- Resolves an issue where an iMac (Retina 5K, 27-inch, 2020) may appear washed out after waking from sleep
macOS Catalina 10.15.6 will likely be the last update to the macOS Catalina operating system as Apple transitions to macOS Big Sur, the newest version of macOS set to be released in the fall.

Article Link: Apple Releases macOS Catalina 10.15.6 Supplemental Update With Virtualization Bug Fix
 
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mb335

macrumors member
Apr 23, 2010
46
7
YES! Glad this came out. Experienced the virtualization issue since updating to 10.15.6, which the workaround was to do frequent rebooting to avoid the issue.
 

CJ Dorschel

macrumors member
Dec 14, 2019
90
64
Berlin
I've been a Mac user for almost 20 years yet this is the first time I have never updated my systems to the latest OS. I've held off on 10.15 but am considering updating as Apple has begun to drop support for certain aspects of 10.14 (security updates, etc will continue of course). I've been experiencing issues on two Mac Pro's that haven't been resolved with weeks of online research, clean installs, and Apple tech leading me to consider updating to 10.15.

My biggest concern is access to root as Apple continues to extend SIP. I've always disabled SIP and Gatekeeper as I require read/write access for development and third party apps. Certainly this it not something everyone should do and doing so is always with risk yet is a necessity for my personal needs and I utilize other precautions, etc.

That stated, my biggest concern is read/write access to root as Apple created two volumes for Applications - User and System. I've created a script that mounts the drive for read/write, assigns the necessary permissions, then deletes it. I've used this on my MacBook Pro for development work which is now running Big Sur.

My concerns with 10.15:

- Will this be necessary in case my system needs to be restarted? (I rarely do so unless necessary)
- Has Apple locked the ability to mount and change root permissions with incremental 10.15.x updates?

Don't even get me started on Big Sur. Running it on my MacBook Pro for development and struggling to adjust to the UI in addition to SSV. I completely understand Apple's focus on security especially for novices/everyday users, yet their focus on locking the system down further with each release makes it difficult for third party developers to maintain their apps which is most likely Apple's true intentions as they want to force developers to utilize the Mac App Store. Given there are ways to easily bypass Apple's security measures - granted they've made the processes more difficult - and users have already found backdoors in Big Sur, I wonder if there are better methods for security measures than what Apple has been implementing since SIP and Gatekeeper were introduced.
 
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dogslobber

macrumors 68040
Oct 19, 2014
3,955
6,104
Apple Campus, Cupertino CA
So, about two and a half weeks between VMware narrowing it down to a sandbox issue, reporting it to Apple, and Apple releasing a fix. That's not so bad.
It's total incompetence that such a stopper got into the field. Some useless developer doesn't know how to unit test their code change properly and the Apple QA process is sorely lacking. This is a total joke.
 

adamw

macrumors 6502
Sep 22, 2006
301
175
At least they fixed the Virtualization apps issue. Probably right about being the last version of Catalina to be released.
 
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MauiPa

macrumors 65816
Apr 18, 2018
1,008
1,313
I've been a Mac user for almost 20 years yet this is the first time I have never updated my systems to the latest OS. I've held off on 10.15 but am considering updating as Apple has begun to drop support for certain aspects of 10.14 (security updates, etc will continue of course). I've been experiencing issues on two Mac Pro's that haven't been resolved with weeks of online research, clean installs, and Apple tech leading me to consider updating to 10.15.

My biggest concern is access to root as Apple continues to extend SIP. I've always disabled SIP and Gatekeeper as I require read/write access for development. Certainly this it not something everyone should do and doing so is always with risk yet is a necessity for my personal needs and I utilize other precautions, etc.

That stated, my biggest concern is read/write access to root as Apple created two volumes for Applications - User and System. I've created a script that mounts the drive for read/write, assigns the necessary permissions, then deletes it. I've used this on my MacBook Pro for development work which is now running Big Sur.

My concerns with 10.15:

- Will this be necessary in case my system needs to be restarted? (I rarely do so unless necessary)
- Has Apple locked the ability to mount and change root permissions with incremental 10.15.x updates?

Don't even get me started on Big Sur. Running it on my MacBook Pro for development and struggling to adjust to the UI in addition to SSV. I completely understand Apple's focus on security especially for novices/everyday users, yet their focus on locking the system down further with each release makes it difficult for third party developers to maintain their apps which is most likely Apple's true intentions as they want to force developers to utilize the Mac App Store. Given there are ways to easily bypass Apple's security measures - granted they've made the processes more difficult - and users have already found backdoors in Big Sur, I wonder if there are better methods for security measures than what Apple has been implementing since SIP and Gatekeeper were introduced.
Seriously? Mac development works fine giving your apps and Xcode appropriate permissions and Apple is not trying to lock down developers

are you sure you aren’t in one of those intellectual traps where you are creating your own imagined problems? Time to rethink?

Of course if you were specific, maybe I could see your point
 

Realityck

macrumors 6502a
Nov 9, 2015
585
495
Silicon Valley, CA
So, about two and a half weeks between VMware narrowing it down to a sandbox issue, reporting it to Apple, and Apple releasing a fix. That's not so bad.
While the VM observations certainly helped, Apple didn't respond to any reports or submitting feedback of kernel crashes with just using the computers with Mac applications, no VM. For me turning off BlueTooth seemed to make it a lot more stable, but still it happened occasionally. I went to Big Sur PB instead of sticking with 10.15.6, anything was better then a OS with kernel panics. :rolleyes:
 
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chucker23n1

macrumors 601
Dec 7, 2014
4,362
5,513
It's total incompetence that such a stopper got into the field. Some useless developer doesn't know how to unit test their code change properly and the Apple QA process is sorely lacking. This is a total joke.
How do you check for a memory leak in a unit test?
 
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nt5672

macrumors 68020
Jun 30, 2007
2,062
4,465
How do you check for a memory leak in a unit test?
I think the meaning was "test" and you use Instruments development tool called Leaks. So the simple test is that you run your unit tests while monitoring with Leaks. Even better design your unit tests to test for leaks.
 
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CJ Dorschel

macrumors member
Dec 14, 2019
90
64
Berlin
Seriously? Mac development works fine giving your apps and Xcode appropriate permissions and Apple is not trying to lock down developers

are you sure you aren’t in one of those intellectual traps where you are creating your own imagined problems? Time to rethink?

Of course if you were specific, maybe I could see your point
Thank you for the kind assistance. My question was simple and I'm not in an "intellectual trap". If you have nothing productive to add to a discussion, perhaps it's best to be an adult and refrain from unnecessary slights.

As for an "example", many third party apps require access to specific area's. TotalSpaces is one example of an app I've used since Apple removed Exposé's "grids". Yet this has nothing to do with my questions. Perhaps this old thread regarding this particular "example" may be informative although it is from 2016. Third party app developers have had to struggle with Apple's changes since El Capitan and many of us refuse to use the App Store for many reasons yet - again - none of this has to do with my question(s). I've noticed you tend to talk down to people often on this site without actually helping. That's a shame. I hope you grow out of that phase soon.

https://www.reddit.com/r/osx/comments/3qq89p
 
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noraa

macrumors 6502
Jun 23, 2003
319
731
I actually experienced the virtualization bug for the first time today, so the timing here is perfect.
 
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chucker23n1

macrumors 601
Dec 7, 2014
4,362
5,513
I think the meaning was "test" and you use Instruments development tool called Leaks. So the simple test is that you run your unit tests while monitoring with Leaks. Even better design your unit tests to test for leaks.
They should absolutely test for leaks, but… that seems antithetical to a unit test.
 
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