Apple Reminds Developers About Updates for HTML5 Apps and Changes to Kids App Categories

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Apr 12, 2001
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Apple today updated its developer news site with details about two upcoming changes that developers should be aware of.

Apple in June 2019 updated the App Store guidelines to clarify that apps that contain or run code not embedded in the binary (aka HTML5) cannot provide access to real money gaming, lotteries, or charitable donations. All apps must comply with these guidelines by March 3, 2020.
The App Store Review Guidelines are designed to help developers create apps that are secure, high-quality, reliable, and that respect user privacy. In order to ensure this, we've always specified that all apps be self-contained bundles. This means that the core features and functionality of the app must be contained within the software's binary, rather than made possible by referring users outside of the approved app -- including through the use of HTML5. Apps that dynamically provide core features and functionality with web technology like HTML5 are best delivered through Safari, rather than through the curated App Store.
Separately, Apple also made changes to apps for children, and such apps are not allowed to transmit personally identifiable information or device information to third-parties. Apple must also require a parental gate to link out of the app.
When parents visit the Kids category on the App Store, they expect that the apps they find are suitable for children. That's why apps published on the App Store must protect children's data and provide only age-appropriate content. Apps must also require a parental gate in order to link out of the app, request permissions, or present purchasing opportunities. It's critical that apps do not transmit personally identifiable information or device information to third parties, and that advertisements are human-reviewed for age appropriateness in order to be displayed.
Developers of apps for children must be in full compliance with the updated guidelines by March 3, 2020.

Article Link: Apple Reminds Developers About Updates for HTML5 Apps and Changes to Kids App Categories
 

Appleman3546

macrumors regular
May 13, 2019
114
134
So developers don’t have a choice if they want to publish there. I understand that Apple is trying to be consumer friendly, but the devs are going to flock away when the anti-trust lawsuit (or Europe investigation) requires browser downloads (like on the Mac). I hope that some of these developers at least reach out to www.altstore.io to see if they can put their app on that iOS store until either ruling concludes
 

iBluetooth

macrumors regular
Mar 29, 2016
174
218
So developers don’t have a choice if they want to publish there. I understand that Apple is trying to be consumer friendly, but the devs are going to flock away when the anti-trust lawsuit (or Europe investigation) requires browser downloads (like on the Mac). I hope that some of these developers at least reach out to www.altstore.io to see if they can put their app on that iOS store until either ruling concludes
Developers can submit the code with the app. How can you trust an app that can change the code at any moment and steel your bitcoin etc.
 

MikhailT

macrumors 601
Nov 12, 2007
4,381
931
So developers don’t have a choice if they want to publish there. I understand that Apple is trying to be consumer friendly, but the devs are going to flock away when the anti-trust lawsuit (or Europe investigation) requires browser downloads (like on the Mac). I hope that some of these developers at least reach out to www.altstore.io to see if they can put their app on that iOS store until either ruling concludes
Apple is doing the right thing here; I do not want native apps that depends on dynamic code that can be remotely changed. Use webviews and take users there instead of bundling the code in.


I know there's a fairly large amount of people who think progressive web apps are the future, I'm glad Apple agrees it's not
Oh please, 99% of people don't know what PWA are. They're just web sites to them.

Keep in mind Apple released iPhone originally without an SDK with hopes that web apps are enough and devs + folks said it wasn't. Apple WANTED the web apps.
 

Appleman3546

macrumors regular
May 13, 2019
114
134
Developers can submit the code with the app. How can you trust an app that can change the code at any moment and steel your bitcoin etc.
You realize that apps downloaded from the Mac browser do this, the consumer is the one given the choice about whether to trust a website enough to download. Not to mention that those apps usually have a website that have dynamic code... Apple is trying to be gatekeeper but when browser downloads are eventually permitted on iPhones, the developer dominos that Apple has lined up will fall and the gatekeeping Apple App Store will be the less attractive option for the developers so Apple will have a developer problem (even if they are the consumer friendly store front). No matter how easy it is to develop for the Mac App Store, the majority of apps are still downloaded from the browser on macs to avoid Apples arbitrary rules. Look at the chunk the Epic store just took out of Steam because of the smaller store fee...
 

Jakexb

macrumors 6502a
Mar 18, 2014
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I know there's a fairly large amount of people who think progressive web apps are the future, I'm glad Apple agrees it's not
Why would you be glad it's not? If apple weren't dragging their feet, web-based apps would be indistinguishable in quality from binary apps. There's no reason except for platform support that they're not already.
 

urtules

macrumors 6502
Jul 30, 2010
268
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Why would you be glad it's not? If apple weren't dragging their feet, web-based apps would be indistinguishable in quality from binary apps. There's no reason except for platform support that they're not already.
Are Android progressive web apps better than native Android apps? Or Google doesn't' give enough support for web APIs as well? Web apps will always be lesser to native apps. They run in web browser, instead of running on device directly.