Apple Revamps Everyone Can Code Curriculum, Offers Coding Classes in Apple Stores in December

MacRumors

macrumors bot
Original poster
Apr 12, 2001
46,354
8,757



Apple today announced that it has overhauled its Everyone Can Code curriculum to bring it to more elementary and middle school students around the world.

The new curriculum includes more resources for teachers, a new guide for students, and updated Swift Coding Club materials. The refreshed materials build on existing interactive puzzles and activities to make coding more approachable and connected to students' every day lives.


Apple is adding Everyone Can Code Puzzles to the new student guide in Swift Playgrounds, and each chapter will let students build on core coding concepts and experiment with new techniques. The teacher guide will provide teachers with the tools necessary to bring coding into their classrooms.

The new curriculum includes the Everyone Can Create project guides, which Apple says will help students "express what they learn through drawing, music, videos and photos."

According to Apple, millions of students in more than 5,000 schools worldwide use the Everyone Can Code curriculum.

From December 1 to December 15, Apple is also offering free Today at Apple coding sessions that are set to be held at Apple Stores. The aim of the classes is to teach attendees to write their first lines of code in order to celebrate Computer Science Education Week.

Apple says that the sessions will provide opportunities for students of all skill levels. Those starting out will explore block-based coding with robots, while those with more experience will be able to use Swift Playgrounds to learn coding concepts or code an augmented reality experience.

Some Apple retail stores will also be offering special sessions designed for coders of all ages, including preschool-age kids, who will be able to learn pre-coding activities through the Coding Lab with "Helpsters," one of the Apple TV+ shows.

Apple is supporting Hour of Code this year with an Hour of Code Facilitator Guide that will help educators and parents host sessions using Swift Playgrounds and educational apps from the App Store.

Article Link: Apple Revamps Everyone Can Code Curriculum, Offers Coding Classes in Apple Stores in December
 

konqerror

macrumors 65816
Dec 31, 2013
1,061
1,893
The thing is the program is a thinly-veiled way to sell iPads. Anybody who's serious about learning to code is going to have to switch to a Mac afterwards, so it makes no sense otherwise to make this an iPad-only app.
 

itsmilo

macrumors 68030
Sep 15, 2016
2,686
5,421
Europe
I would like to disagree. I had to take java 5 times at university and it almost cost me my degree and the worst years of my life. I even recorded myself when I was finally able to delete Eclipse from my computer
 

i4k20c

macrumors 6502a
Sep 10, 2005
677
16
does anyone know if these classes are for adults too? i would love to learn to code on the side.
 
  • Like
Reactions: DeepIn2U

needsomecoffee

macrumors regular
May 6, 2008
160
376
Seattle
Everyone in the walled garden can learn to code. Our entire school district is left out. Appreciate Apple's effort, but as they move into services -- embracing a cross-platform approach will be beneficial for consumers/kids and ultimately Apple. Hopefully the recent job posting for Windevs is a start. Still crossing my fingers that Apple will start to show its endorsement for PWAs not just native apps.
 

AxiomaticRubric

macrumors 6502
Sep 24, 2010
449
393
On Mars, Praising the Omnissiah
The thing is the program is a thinly-veiled way to sell iPads. Anybody who's serious about learning to code is going to have to switch to a Mac afterwards, so it makes no sense otherwise to make this an iPad-only app.
The iPad retains its value as a training tool long after someone starts creating apps in Xcode on the Mac.

Even so I wish we could have an iPadOS version of Xcode with the ability to build and run apps inside the walled sandbox of the operating system. At the *very least* it would be great way to quickly build UI prototypes.



does anyone know if these classes are for adults too? i would love to learn to code on the side.
Apple has coding intro sessions at most of their stores. For anything more in depth I recommend the Ray Wenderlich website, and Dr. Paul Hegarty’s iOS development course at Stanford (available in the Podcasts app).



Everyone in the walled garden can learn to code. Our entire school district is left out. Appreciate Apple's effort, but as they move into services -- embracing a cross-platform approach will be beneficial for consumers/kids and ultimately Apple. Hopefully the recent job posting for Windevs is a start. Still crossing my fingers that Apple will start to show its endorsement for PWAs not just native apps.
I too would like to see a client-side web framework for Swift. Maybe it will happen after WebAssembly really takes off.
 

brofkand

macrumors 6502
Jun 11, 2006
458
883
Are they going to actually teach coding, or are they just going to teach Swift Playgrounds?

Swift Playgrounds won't get kids very far if they want to learn to code. It's good enough to teach the bare, bare, basics I suppose - but it's not a particularly powerful app.
 
  • Like
Reactions: dominiongamma

SmokeItLow

macrumors newbie
Nov 13, 2006
11
4
Canada
Are they going to actually teach coding, or are they just going to teach Swift Playgrounds?

Swift Playgrounds won't get kids very far if they want to learn to code. It's good enough to teach the bare, bare, basics I suppose - but it's not a particularly powerful app.
Learning some of the basic coding concepts is a step in the right direction at least. The playgrounds iPad app does a fairly good job with the gamification of coding. For young kids, I think it's more important to perk their interest and make it seem fun and not a scary thing. I see too many kids afraid to even try coding because "they're not good with computers" or it "looks hard". We need more focus on exposure to coding at younger ages here in North America.
 
  • Love
Reactions: DeepIn2U

Paradoxally

macrumors 68000
Feb 4, 2011
1,594
1,857
I would like to disagree. I had to take java 5 times at university and it almost cost me my degree and the worst years of my life. I even recorded myself when I was finally able to delete Eclipse from my computer
To be fair, Java is a horrible language and Eclipse is a nightmare to use.
 
  • Like
Reactions: DeepIn2U

robjulo

macrumors 65816
Jul 16, 2010
1,270
2,052
They should be focused on getting iOS and Mac product into schools by subsidizing them to a ridiculously low price point. They are getting killed by google and Microsoft in that space and it is going to cost them in the end.
 
  • Like
Reactions: DeepIn2U

Lalatoon

macrumors regular
Jul 8, 2019
228
148
I would have to say that Apple is one of the best in marketing :)

I mean this programs (like the one giving iPhone for kids learning photography) is the best way to make sure that the next generation will be lock into Apple brand. I think the idea is you have to indoctrinate the next generation in their formative and teenage years. As they grow up Apple is also growing inside their heart and mind or psyche.

I am not complaining though, just an observation.
 

DeepIn2U

macrumors 603
May 30, 2002
6,152
1,691
Toronto, Ontario, Canada
They should be focused on getting iOS and Mac product into schools by subsidizing them to a ridiculously low price point. They are getting killed by google and Microsoft in that space and it is going to cost them in the end.
exactly! As youth no grow up macs are foreign to them. Soon iOS on iPhone n iPad will too since exposure early on to the other platforms pulls them away. Jobs recognized the significance of being in K12 market while Cook only cares bout iOS for future growth. Makes me believe Mac is on life support right now.
 

unplugme71

macrumors 68030
May 20, 2011
2,758
714
Earth
Are they going to actually teach coding, or are they just going to teach Swift Playgrounds?

Swift Playgrounds won't get kids very far if they want to learn to code. It's good enough to teach the bare, bare, basics I suppose - but it's not a particularly powerful app.
I can’t imagine more than 20% of Apple retail stores have 1 person that codes. My guess is, it’s a guided tutorial Apple created that someone sits there and plays.

I’ve seen a lot of creative classes and some trainers are simply either horrible at teaching or not well educated and simply put there to fill a role.

I remember having to fill in for iWeb. Luckily I had learned html on my own so I was actually useful to the person. I can’t imagine how many times someone quits or calls out and a random person has to fill in for training that day.