Become a MacRumors Supporter for $50/year with no ads, ability to filter front page stories, and private forums.

dude-x

macrumors regular
Mar 2, 2007
204
245
New York City
ROFLMAO to anyone using emoji. :apple:
[doublepost=1509715887][/doublepost]

The most accurate post in MR this week. Well done. :apple:
Technically, emoji is from the Japanese cell phone industry and is different from icons in the Unicode Standard. Now that emoji is part of the Unicode standard, the difference is that they are colorful glyphs, when icons were just black in a font set.
 

hasanahmad

macrumors 65816
May 20, 2009
1,426
1,561
This is the emoji that Apple sheeps use to troll Android fans and this is also the emoji Android shills use to troll Apple fans
 

reallynotnick

macrumors 65816
Oct 21, 2005
1,253
1,207
For those who keep asking how Apple know's this, it says right in their link:

Count Mean Sketch

In our use of the Count Mean Sketch technique for differential privacy, the original information being processed for sharing with Apple is encoded using a series of mathematical functions known as hash functions, making it easy to represent data of varying sizes in a matrix of fixed size.

The data is encoded using variations of a SHA-256 hash followed by a privatization step and then written into the sketch matrix with its values initialized to zero.

The noise injection step works as follows: After encoding the input as a vector using a hash function, each coordinate of the vector is then flipped (written as an incorrect value) with a probability of 1/(1 + /2), where is the privacy parameter. This assures that analysis of the collected data cannot distinguish actual values from flipped values, helping to assure the privacy of the shared information.

In order to stay within the privacy budget we do not send the entire sketch matrix to the server but only a random row of the matrix. When the information encoded in the sketch matrix is sent to Apple, the Apple server tallies the responses from all devices sharing information and outputs the mean value for each element of the array. Although each submission contains many randomized elements, the average value across large numbers of submissions gives Apple meaningful aggregate data.
 

Ronlap

macrumors 6502
Sep 7, 2007
269
202
San Francisco Bay Area
It really ticks me off that I need to waste expensive iPhone memory on thousands of emojis that I will never use. :- ) :-( :-0 and their equivalents with a wink ; have worked fine for me for the last 20 or so years.
 

dogslobber

macrumors 601
Oct 19, 2014
4,670
7,808
Apple Campus, Cupertino CA
For those who keep asking how Apple know's this, it says right in their link:

Count Mean Sketch

In our use of the Count Mean Sketch technique for differential privacy, the original information being processed for sharing with Apple is encoded using a series of mathematical functions known as hash functions, making it easy to represent data of varying sizes in a matrix of fixed size.

The data is encoded using variations of a SHA-256 hash followed by a privatization step and then written into the sketch matrix with its values initialized to zero.

The noise injection step works as follows: After encoding the input as a vector using a hash function, each coordinate of the vector is then flipped (written as an incorrect value) with a probability of 1/(1 + /2), where is the privacy parameter. This assures that analysis of the collected data cannot distinguish actual values from flipped values, helping to assure the privacy of the shared information.

In order to stay within the privacy budget we do not send the entire sketch matrix to the server but only a random row of the matrix. When the information encoded in the sketch matrix is sent to Apple, the Apple server tallies the responses from all devices sharing information and outputs the mean value for each element of the array. Although each submission contains many randomized elements, the average value across large numbers of submissions gives Apple meaningful aggregate data.
What is "probability of 1/(1 + /2)" and how do I calculate that using my iPhone calculator?

Whatever magic sauce Apple is claiming is encrypted here, that they can see and count the emoji instances means either they (Apple or NSA) can decrypt it or they (Apple or NSA) can correlate the encrypted signature to actual emoji symbols. Where they do for emoji, the logical extension is all other characters of the cleartext. In other words, no encryption at all.
 

bunnicula

macrumors 68040
Jul 23, 2008
3,816
817
I swear that one is my most frequent. I find so much to laugh hysterically about lately. ;)
 

slardy

macrumors newbie
Oct 31, 2017
2
0
I'm just surprised the thumbs up isn't on there. thats easily the one I use the most. I guess its not as common as I thought
 

Bromeo

macrumors regular
Mar 6, 2015
224
132
Near Seattle
What is "probability of 1/(1 + /2)" and how do I calculate that using my iPhone calculator?

Whatever magic sauce Apple is claiming is encrypted here, that they can see and count the emoji instances means either they (Apple or NSA) can decrypt it or they (Apple or NSA) can correlate the encrypted signature to actual emoji symbols. Where they do for emoji, the logical extension is all other characters of the cleartext. In other words, no encryption at all.

I gather that works out to a 66% probability that your keystroke will be replaced with average noise.

Messages app isn’t the only place you use your keyboard. Presumably this stat comes from analyzing general keyboard usage across the entire OS, and would include all keys.

This method doesn’t preclude encrypting iMessages end-to-end. Not much any entity could do with an individual iPhone user’s analytic key frequency data especially given the significant noise added to it.
 
Register on MacRumors! This sidebar will go away, and you'll see fewer ads.