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Apple today seeded the third beta of an upcoming macOS Sierra 10.12.6 update to developers, two weeks after seeding the second 10.12.6 beta and a month after introducing macOS Sierra 10.12.5.

macOS Sierra 10.12.6 can be downloaded through the Apple Developer Center or through the Software Update mechanism in the Mac App Store.

10.12.6-beta-800x500.jpg

No significant features or notable bug fixes were found in the first two macOS Sierra 10.12.6 betas, and because Apple does not provide beta release notes, we may not know what's included in the update until it sees a public release.

macOS Sierra 10.12.6 is likely to be one of the final updates to the Sierra operating system as Apple transitions to macOS High Sierra, which was introduced at the Worldwide Developers Conference in June.

Update: The third beta of macOS Sierra 10.12.6 is also available for public beta testers.

Article Link: Apple Seeds Third Beta of macOS Sierra 10.12.6 to Developers [Update: Public Beta Available]
 

justperry

macrumors G5
Aug 10, 2007
12,333
9,504
I'm a rolling stone.
High Sierra for me, works well except for a few glithes and a borked install on one of my Macs.
First Sierra beta was better though, no bugs at all for me.
 
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lkrupp

macrumors 65816
Jul 24, 2004
1,310
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So many betas nowadays :)
Waiting for 10.13 DP 2

I guess there’s no middle ground. Some are always screaming, “Doesn’t Apple test this stuff before they release it.” “Apple’s QA is in the toilet these days” “Steve would never have allowed this.” Now we’re starting hear, “Too many betas.” “Too confusing.” “Take my hand and show me ,step by step, how to back out of this POS beta.” Apple can’t win.
[doublepost=1497378192][/doublepost]
Seems like a cheap way to crowd source bug spotting. The only problem I fear is that internal QC/QA has been cut in response. Some things like security really need to be done right the first time.

See what I mean?
 

asiga

macrumors 6502a
Nov 4, 2012
979
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Thanks a lot, MR, I was impatient for not seeing more 10.12.6 betas released during these weeks, but I guess it was because of the release of new Macs and High Sierra. I'm really looking forward to 10.12.6, as I suppose it will be the last 10.12.x release and I'll be installing it from scratch in some old Macs that really need a new MacOS install from scratch (they will be kept on 10.12.6 all this year).
 
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konqerror

macrumors 68020
Dec 31, 2013
2,298
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I guess there’s no middle ground. Some are always screaming, “Doesn’t Apple test this stuff before they release it.” “Apple’s QA is in the toilet these days” “Steve would never have allowed this.” Now we’re starting hear, “Too many betas.” “Too confusing.” “Take my hand and show me ,step by step, how to back out of this POS beta.” Apple can’t win.

See what I mean?

There's two different types of releases and they're not identical. So there is a middle ground.

You need to beta changes that affect APIs and programs and end behavior, but it takes Apple 3 months and 14 betas to release security and bug fixes. Look at Microsoft: they put out a security and bug patch every month and they don't need betas. Meanwhile, their 6-month feature changes do undergo multiple betas.

The complaint is that security issues and defects drag on for longer than necessary due to this crowd-sourced QA. Microsoft can fix critical problems on an average of 2 weeks, what's Apple got?
 
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nvarga

macrumors member
Mar 26, 2013
51
9
Critic security patches were pushed without beta testing in the past. IIRC even automatic installation without user permission also.
 

Ener Ji

macrumors 6502
Apr 10, 2010
406
295
When this goes final, I wonder if this will be the time to upgrade from El Capitan on my daily driver? I don't usually wait so long, but almost all of the new features in Sierra don't apply to me.
 
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asiga

macrumors 6502a
Nov 4, 2012
979
1,257
When this goes final, I wonder if this will be the time to upgrade from El Capitan on my daily driver? I don't usually wait so long, but almost all of the new features in Sierra don't apply to me.
After bad experiences from updating soon these last years, I decided to update only once per year, in summer, when they release the last update for the current MacOS. It's somewhat drastic, but it works great for me, as it lets me work with the same level of stability I was used to in the 10.4.x - 10.6.x years. So, yes, I'm updating to Sierra when 10.12.6 gets final.
 

mithion

macrumors regular
Mar 1, 2016
186
449
Reno, NV
Sierra has been good to me. I've had fewer problems with it than I did with El Cap. I find it interesting that El Cap was supposed to be a refinement of Yosemity but I ended up having more issues with it. Sierra has been smooth sailing however. The pattern established with El Cap however makes me weary of High Sierra. I guess we shall see...
 

manhattanboy

macrumors 6502a
Jan 25, 2007
960
370
In ur GF's bed, Oh no he didn't!
I guess there’s no middle ground.
See what I mean?
Betas are fine, but PUBLIC betas are a different matter. The middle ground is that unfinished pieces that would put users in jeopardy, like having untested security mechanisms in a beta release, should not be released to the public IMHO. Ideally, Apple should just state what feedback they are wanting with the public beta release, and what parts if any are considered not final.
[doublepost=1497395220][/doublepost]
There's two different types of releases and they're not identical. So there is a middle ground.

You need to beta changes that affect APIs and programs and end behavior, but it takes Apple 3 months and 14 betas to release security and bug fixes. Look at Microsoft: they put out a security and bug patch every month and they don't need betas. Meanwhile, their 6-month feature changes do undergo multiple betas.

The complaint is that security issues and defects drag on for longer than necessary due to this crowd-sourced QA. Microsoft can fix critical problems on an average of 2 weeks, what's Apple got?
Well said. While I cannot vouch for Microsoft's track record, your exact appreciation of the separation between security and OS/API features is what the poster was failing to comprehend.
 

az431

Suspended
Sep 13, 2008
2,131
6,123
Portland, OR
There's two different types of releases and they're not identical. So there is a middle ground.

You need to beta changes that affect APIs and programs and end behavior, but it takes Apple 3 months and 14 betas to release security and bug fixes. Look at Microsoft: they put out a security and bug patch every month and they don't need betas. Meanwhile, their 6-month feature changes do undergo multiple betas.

The complaint is that security issues and defects drag on for longer than necessary due to this crowd-sourced QA. Microsoft can fix critical problems on an average of 2 weeks, what's Apple got?

Did you make all of this up as you were typing?
 

loby

macrumors 68000
Jul 1, 2010
1,511
1,078
Sierra has been good to me. I've had fewer problems with it than I did with El Cap. I find it interesting that El Cap was supposed to be a refinement of Yosemity but I ended up having more issues with it. Sierra has been smooth sailing however. The pattern established with El Cap however makes me weary of High Sierra. I guess we shall see...

Same here. A little weary about Hight Sierra, but here's hoping. If it is just a slight adjustment with the "High" only, maybe this might be a rare very stable OS out of the shoot...
 

dogslobber

macrumors 601
Oct 19, 2014
4,670
7,802
Apple Campus, Cupertino CA
Sierra has been good to me. I've had fewer problems with it than I did with El Cap. I find it interesting that El Cap was supposed to be a refinement of Yosemity but I ended up having more issues with it. Sierra has been smooth sailing however. The pattern established with El Cap however makes me weary of High Sierra. I guess we shall see...

I didn't move to Sierra until Service Pack 3. I'll likely do the same for High Sierra as there's nothing 'must have' for me. I am playing about with is on an older Mac with DP1 release. Not seen anything remotely must-have yet, but early doors.
 

tjleonard

macrumors 6502a
Jun 25, 2013
581
381
I didn't move to Sierra until Service Pack 3. I'll likely do the same for High Sierra as there's nothing 'must have' for me. I am playing about with is on an older Mac with DP1 release. Not seen anything remotely must-have yet, but early doors.
I think high Sierra will just be super stable.
 

Glassed Silver

macrumors 68020
Mar 10, 2007
2,096
2,564
Kassel, Germany
I guess there’s no middle ground. Some are always screaming, “Doesn’t Apple test this stuff before they release it.” “Apple’s QA is in the toilet these days” “Steve would never have allowed this.” Now we’re starting hear, “Too many betas.” “Too confusing.” “Take my hand and show me ,step by step, how to back out of this POS beta.” Apple can’t win.
[doublepost=1497378192][/doublepost]

See what I mean?
It's almost as if this forum isn't one homogenous mass of agreeing people, who would have thought!

As for the second guy, he's bang on and it's been reported that they made cuts.

And it's not like you can't see the results of it.

Glassed Silver:mac
 

developer13245

macrumors 6502a
Nov 15, 2012
700
908
Guide to macOS recent releases:

10.13 = High Sierra
10.12 = Sierra
10.11 = Half Baked Sierra (a.k.a) El Crap
 

CristianM

macrumors member
Aug 4, 2015
74
170
I guess there’s no middle ground. Some are always screaming, “Doesn’t Apple test this stuff before they release it.” “Apple’s QA is in the toilet these days” “Steve would never have allowed this.” Now we’re starting hear, “Too many betas.” “Too confusing.” “Take my hand and show me ,step by step, how to back out of this POS beta.” Apple can’t win.
[doublepost=1497378192][/doublepost]

See what I mean?

Apple keeps hiking the prices of their already expensive computers. At that peice, a user should not be expected to test out buggy beta software for a few months and has every right to expect that everything should work perfectly - that's what we pay all that cash for right?
 
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tentales

macrumors 6502a
Dec 6, 2010
771
1,184
So many betas nowadays :)
Waiting for 10.13 DP 2
Betas = software not for general release to production environments

When this goes final, ....
Complaints about release quality should be reserved for final releases.

After bad experiences from updating soon these last years, ....
All the whiners must be new to computers. The universal truth is: never upgrade your working production system to the newest release on release day or too soon thereafter. Guess bad experiences of others are not really felt until you mess things up yourself.

Betas are fine, but PUBLIC betas are a different matter. The middle ground is that unfinished pieces that would put users in jeopardy, .....
Public Betas are not forced upon you. It's an opportunity for curious minds to test stuff outside the scope of the developer community. As before, Betas are NOT meant for production use. Run them on a test system to satisfy your curiosity, but if you deploy a Beta or Final .0 release on your one-and-only daily driver, then you know what they said about who curiosity killed.

Apple keeps hiking the prices of their already expensive computers. At that peice, a user should not be expected to test out buggy beta software for a few months and has every right to expect that everything should work perfectly - that's what we pay all that cash for right?
Ahhm nope. What makes you think that price has anything to do with QoS ?
Complexity is the enemy of reliability and macOS is a long ways away from the cat-naming days of OS X releases.
Have to throw the old "Snow Leopard was best" mantra in here :)
 
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RednBlue

macrumors regular
Dec 17, 2013
202
79
Reading UK
Apple keeps hiking the prices of their already expensive computers. At that peice, a user should not be expected to test out buggy beta software for a few months and has every right to expect that everything should work perfectly - that's what we pay all that cash for right?
The user isn't 'expected to test out buggy beta software' - by my reckoning if he's a beta tester he has the choice/option whether or not to test the beta.
 
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