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Apple today published its second annual App Store Transparency Report [PDF], highlighting details like the number of apps that were rejected during the year, the number of customer and developer accounts deactivated, the number of apps removed from the App Store, and more.

iOS-App-Store-General-Feature-Sqaure-Complement.jpg

In 2023, there were 1,870,119 total apps available, and Apple reviewed 6,892,500 app submissions. 1,763,812 apps were rejected, with performance, design, and legal listed as the top reasons why an app wasn't approved. 277,923 apps were approved after rejection following changes made to the app.

116,117 apps were removed from the App Store, and top categories for removal included Utilities, Games, and Business. 76,887 apps were removed for violating Guideline 4.0 on design, and 35,245 apps were removed for violating App Store rules preventing fraud.

Apple removed 1,285 apps at the request of the Chinese government, and 103 at the request of the South Korean government. Apps were also pulled in India, Russia, Indonesia, Lithuania, Ukraine, and several other countries at the request of their respective governments.

398,499,012 customer accounts search the App Store on average on a weekly basis, and 166,360 apps appear in the top 10 results of at least 1000 searches each week. As Apple said earlier this week, it terminated 373,739,771 customer accounts and prevented an estimated $1,838,127,451 in fraudulent transactions.

More information on Apple's App Store numbers can be found in the full report. [PDF]

Article Link: Apple Shares 2023 App Store Transparency Report
 

ArtOfWarfare

macrumors G3
Nov 26, 2007
9,578
6,090
1,763,812 apps were rejected, with performance, design, and legal listed as the top reasons why an app wasn't approved.

[...]

Apple removed 1,285 apps at the request of the Chinese government, and 103 at the request of the South Korean government. Apps were also pulled in India, Russia, Indonesia, Lithuania, Ukraine, and several other countries at the request of their respective governments.
All of this is a huge part of why we need to be able to download apps not via the App Store.

Performance is... eh. Maybe it's reasonable that they make that call, ie, if the app just appears to be non-responsive.

Design is definitely something Apple needs to butt out of. Consumers should drive whether a design is bad or not, not Apple. This is how macOS works and most people are happy with the design of most of the apps they use on the platform.

Legal and government is very concerning. Apple is making themselves a tool for authoritarian governments. And I seriously doubt they have a huge legal team reviewing the apps.

Apple needs to have a much bigger focus on keeping scams off the store.
 

jasonsmith_88

macrumors regular
Jul 27, 2016
176
389
So you want the app store to be absolute mess, I gather?

Nobody would have a problem with the App Store if there were alternative methods of distribution. But in all markets except the EU, the App Store is the only way to distribute apps.

The right to develop and distribute software should be fundamental. If Apple revokes a perfectly legal app because of some nonsense clause, this can absolutely ruin someone’s life who is relying on that income to pay a mortgage.

The “buy an Android” argument is laughable. In that case, why do we have any regulations all? Why do we regulate car safety when people could just buy a Volvo? Why do we have building codes when people could just hire a reputable builder? Why do we have privacy laws when people could just choose not to divulge their information?

We regulate industry because the free market is incapable of doing what’s best for the consumer. Apple preventing the distribution of legal software is not best for the consumer.
 

I7guy

macrumors Nehalem
Nov 30, 2013
34,366
24,143
Gotta be in it to win it
Nobody would have a problem with the App Store if there were alternative methods of distribution. But in all markets except the EU, the App Store is the only way to distribute apps.
And we’re about find out if it’s cap or not.
The right to develop and distribute software should be fundamental. If Apple revokes a perfectly legal app because of some nonsense clause, this can absolutely ruin someone’s life who is relying on that income to pay a mortgage.
The right to distribute software is not fundamental. It’s like saying the right to drive fundamental. You drive with a dui and crash and can ruin someone’s life. There are many things in life that are not fundamental.
The “buy an Android” argument is laughable. In that case, why do we have any regulations all? Why do we regulate car safety when people could just buy a Volvo? Why do we have building codes when people could just hire a reputable builder? Why do we have privacy laws when people could just choose not to divulge their information?
The buy the competition is a perfect view. After all, Macrumors posters continually say competition is good. Why is competition good unless you are willing to buy a competitors better product?
We regulate industry because the free market is incapable of doing what’s best for the consumer.
Actually governmental regulation usually one party at the expense of another. And the more government intervenes the worse it is. Some things should only be managed due to the free market.
Apple preventing the distribution of legal software is not best for the consumer.
Yes it is, overall.
 

d-klumpp

macrumors regular
Oct 5, 2010
106
82
Chicago
The right to develop and distribute software should be fundamental. If Apple revokes a perfectly legal app because of some nonsense clause, this can absolutely ruin someone’s life who is relying on that income to pay a mortgage.
There is no "right" to make a living off another's platform, although there may be such a privilege given.
 
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