Apple Stock down?

MacFan782040

macrumors 6502a
Original poster
Dec 1, 2003
791
110
Scranton, PA
It's at liek $44 compared to high 80's on friday.

Maybe a 2 for 1 split thing? I don't know much about the stock market haha... but it looks worse now.
 

stubeeef

macrumors 68030
Aug 10, 2004
2,702
2
MacFan782040 said:
It's at liek $44 compared to high 80's on friday.

Maybe a 2 for 1 split thing? I don't know much about the stock market haha... but it looks worse now.

Yes it split. :eek:
 

mac-er

macrumors 65816
Apr 9, 2003
1,454
0
MacFan782040 said:
It's at liek $44 compared to high 80's on friday.

Maybe a 2 for 1 split thing? I don't know much about the stock market haha... but it looks worse now.
Apple announced a 2 for 1 split several weeks ago that would take effect today.

So, if you had one share worth $90, you now have two shares worth $45. :)
 

wdlove

macrumors P6
Oct 20, 2002
16,568
0
For Apple $45 is still a good price. With WWDC and Tiger coming, the price is bound to be on the way up again.
 

ravenvii

macrumors 604
Mar 17, 2004
7,584
490
Melenkurion Skyweir
MacFan782040 said:
Oh sweet- so wait what are the advantages of having a split stock as compared to not?

And can it ever un-split?
No advantage really, it's just a psychological trick. "Ooh $45 is cheap! Let's buy some shares!" and behold as the shares artificially soar.
 

stubeeef

macrumors 68030
Aug 10, 2004
2,702
2
Yes it can "un split" there have been some that have done that since 9-11. Usually very beaten down stocks that don't want to be de-listed. Others here can best explain.

A split stock often goes up now that "percieved" cost of entry is less. The effect often belies logic, but is real none the less.
 

jxyama

macrumors 68040
Apr 3, 2003
3,735
1
MacFan782040 said:
Oh sweet- so wait what are the advantages of having a split stock as compared to not?

And can it ever un-split?
yep, it's just for the convenience...

check this out: a successful company stock that has never split... the price, changes and volumes are somewhat funny. :D

http://finance.yahoo.com/q?s=brka
 

Blackheart

macrumors 6502a
Mar 13, 2004
938
0
Seattle
Savage Henry said:
That is truly the funniest thing I've seen all day .... :D

I just love the days range between 90,200 and 90,500 .... Gawd bless'em for extremist trading.
It's funnier when that's so little a % to even matter to investors.
 

Chip NoVaMac

macrumors G3
Dec 25, 2003
8,894
31
Northern Virginia
wdlove said:
For Apple $45 is still a good price. With WWDC and Tiger coming, the price is bound to be on the way up again.
Unless you have my luck. I could have bought Apple at $25 or so a year ago (or at what ever low point they had :) ) and i could be sitting on stock worth $5 a share. And the iPod would have been a has been in the MP3 market. :D
 

Yvan256

macrumors 603
Jul 5, 2004
5,041
912
Canada
Just bought 200 shares this morning. :D

At the very least, I'm hoping for a "free iBook" kind of return. ;)
 

CorvusCamenarum

macrumors 65816
Dec 16, 2004
1,231
2
Birmingham, AL
Raven VII said:
No advantage really, it's just a psychological trick. "Ooh $45 is cheap! Let's buy some shares!" and behold as the shares artificially soar.
While psychology is an important factor, there's also the benefit in increased liquidity for said commodity. $40 a share is easier to afford than $80, so more people can get into the market. Liquidity is [nearly] always a good thing.

For whomever asked about "un-splitting", yes there is such a thing as a reverse stock split. It works just as you would think.
 

therevolution

macrumors 6502
May 12, 2003
468
0
CorvusCamenarum said:
$40 a share is easier to afford than $80, so more people can get into the market.
That only holds true if you're planning on buying one share. And nobody should be buying one share of a stock at that price if they seriously want a return on the investment (broker commission fees would eat into it too much).

In other words, no, affordability is not the issue. It's primarily psychology.
 

MacAztec

macrumors 68040
Oct 28, 2001
3,023
1
San Luis Obispo, CA
It is great for the people that bought the stock prior to the split. I bought 40 shares at $80, so now I have 80 shares and $45/share. So, now if the stock goes up $1, I make $80, rather than the $40 I was making before.
 

GeorgeTheMonkey

macrumors member
Jun 14, 2004
95
0
DavidLeblond said:
uh, my stock is now worth half but I still have the same amount of shares.

Sharebuilder better fix this. :mad:
Hi,

I emailed Sharebuilder customer support earlier, when I noticed this in my account. They responded immediately, saying that they'll examine stockholders' accounts and, after they verify the purchase date of your stocks, they'll credit your account with the appropriate number of stocks by 3/02/05.

Only after realizing that I suppose the split only just took place last Friday did it occur to me that Sharebuilder is probably being inundated with similar-type inquiries, and they would've taken care of the problem shortly without me bothering them. :p :rolleyes:
 

Chip NoVaMac

macrumors G3
Dec 25, 2003
8,894
31
Northern Virginia
stubeeef said:
Yes it can "un split" there have been some that have done that since 9-11. Usually very beaten down stocks that don't want to be de-listed. Others here can best explain.

A split stock often goes up now that "percieved" cost of entry is less. The effect often belies logic, but is real none the less.
"logic" is in the mind of the investor. In some cases it is the mindset that certain types of stocks should never be above a certain price. Inviting others in to buy the stock at the "lower" value; but hopefully at more than you may have paid for. I know of a few holders of Wash Post stock that have been hoping for a split for some time. For they see the real value of the stock in the $60 to $70 range long term. Not the the $90 to $100 range it is in right now. Some are hoping for a split to be able to double their shares and sell at a $10 premium, others are hoping to see the same share levels as they are now.
 

Dave00

macrumors 6502a
Dec 2, 2003
855
62
Pittsburgh
therevolution said:
In other words, no, affordability is not the issue. It's primarily psychology.
You're both right. :)

As an extreme example, Berkshire Hathaway has deliberately let the price per share soar in order to deter small-time investors. Pretty hard for the average investor to pony up money in $90,000 increments. In the opposite direction, if you're interested in smaller-money investors, a lower share price allows for easier dollar-cost averaging.

There is also definitely some psychology involved. A price over $100 seems expensive, and less than $10 - certainly less than $1 - seems cheap (or, put another way, of little value). That's why most stocks are in the $10-100 range, and companies split (or reverse split) to keep it there.

--D
 

MongoTheGeek

macrumors 68040
It changes volatility. Traders love splits. Investors should hate them with a passion but they don't.

Stock prices are integer amounts. Even though you used to hear 23 1/8th or nowadays 23.13 per share that stocks have a limited range of trading values. The smaller the value of the stock the greater percentage change is obtained from a minimum change in price. A $10 stock goes up a penny that a one mil increase in value. a $100 stock goes up the same penny its a ten thousandth.

If you trigger a buy or a sell based on a 5% gain a $10 stock has to go through 50 different positions. Each one of those might have a sell order waiting to push the price down. The $100 stock has 500 positions waiting with sell orders.

Additionally large traders like to move big blocks of stock. Thousands of shares at a time. I doubt when Merrill or one of the big players buys a stock they do anything less than 10000. (with the possible exception of BH but noone ever sells that)

Funny story. A couple of years ago a holding company was formed to allow the average joe to earn a piece of Warren Buffets action. It was going to use its money to buy a block of BH shares and then sell pieces of each share. The Oracle of Omaha caught wind and introduced B shares at 1/100 the price of A shares and fixed the ratio. The stock shot through the roof.
 

MongoTheGeek

macrumors 68040
Dave00 said:
As an extreme example, Berkshire Hathaway has deliberately let the price per share soar in order to deter small-time investors. Pretty hard for the average investor to pony up money in $90,000 increments. In the opposite direction, if you're interested in smaller-money investors, a lower share price allows for easier dollar-cost averaging.
Actually it was more to try and help the small (at the time then) investors. he wanted to limit speculation and volatility in the stock
 

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